Need some help!
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27 / M / Haugesund, Norway!
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Posted 6/24/10
Ok so i need some help and i thought crunchyroll would be the best place to post this. Im having some translation problems...I need to translate "I love music" to japanese, ive tried google and everything but nothing has helped. I cant translate it myself as if you do, sometimes the word dosent come out right like....i music love etc etc ^^

So some help would be rly appreciated

//Bengan
Posted 7/7/10
watashi wa ongaku o sukidesu

watashi wa= I (or sth like I do)
ongaku=musik
o=particle
sukidesu=i like

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Posted 7/8/10
no! you can't use particle o with suki... and suki just means like, you can use daisuki (like very much) to mean love

so say,

watashi wa ongaku ga daisuki desu.

or you can just say ongaku ga daisuki if you wanna be super simple
Posted 7/8/10

Ruthenium44 wrote:

no! you can't use particle o with suki... and suki just means like, you can use daisuki (like very much) to mean love

so say,

watashi wa ongaku ga daisuki desu.

or you can just say ongaku ga daisuki if you wanna be super simple


Ooops you´re right sorry...
wahaha...my japanese isnt that good...i havent been learning for a long time...
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Posted 7/8/10
haha that's ok ^^ keep working at it! ganbatte ne!
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Posted 7/8/10
Manly Japanese "Ore wa ongaku wo aisiteru ze!" 「俺は音楽を愛してるぜ!」
 
Polite Japanese "watasi wa ongaku wo aisite masu”「私は音楽を愛してます」

or "watasi wa ongaku ga sugoku suki desu"「私は音楽がすごく好きです」 
Posted 7/17/11
A more natural way is " ongaku no koto ga suki" or "ongaku wo kiku no ga suki"
Posted 7/17/11

pu-pon wrote:

Manly Japanese "Ore wa ongaku wo aisiteru ze!" 「俺は音楽を愛してるぜ!」
 
Polite Japanese "watasi wa ongaku wo aisite masu”「私は音楽を愛してます」

or "watasi wa ongaku ga sugoku suki desu"「私は音楽がすごく好きです」 


this is very awkward to say.
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Posted 7/17/11
Hmm, a literal translation would be:
In Romanji: ongaku ga suki desu.
In Japaneese: 音楽が好きです

Since the one liking it, you, is implied, you don't need I.
Through if you want the I part then:

In Romanji: watashi wa ongaku ga suki desu.
In Japanese 私は音楽が好きです
Though this would sound a bit strange cause its already implied your the one that likes it lol.

Also this is in the polite form of speaking, If your talking to someone that is really close to you, you would use a more casual talk which in this case would be changing desu to da, or just removing desu.

Hope this helps.
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Posted 7/19/11 , edited 7/19/11
Umm... some of the submissions of people here sound so stiff and cold, albeit grammatically correct.

The simplest, most casual way would be 音楽が好き (ongaku ga suki). You can add things on to this to give out different impressions to the people around you (using gobi), like so...

Strong (somewhat manly) - 音楽が好きだ (ongaku ga suki da)

Imposing and cute (neutral, but more girlish) = 音楽が好きだぞ (ongaku ga suki da zo)

Polite (best use imho, and I use this form most of the time for almost everything) - 音楽が好きですが (ongaku ga suki desu ga)

Feminine - 音楽が好きなの (ongaku ga suki na no)

A girl who grew up in a mansion - 私、音楽が好きですが/の/わ (watakushi, ongaku ga suki desu ga/no/wa)

Manly with a hint of beating the crap out of the listener - 音楽が好きだろうが (ongaku ga suki darou ga)

Uncertain (makes one sound cute if you're a girl, but somewhat obnoxious if you're a guy. Think Koizumi.) - 音楽が好きだと思う (ongaku ga suki da to omou)


Yeah, I'm messing around a bit, but these are far more casual expressions that what I've read previously.



EDIT: as an additional note, the gobi が (ga) sounds more like "nga" when used at the end.



pu-pon wrote:

Manly Japanese "Ore wa ongaku wo aisiteru ze!" 「俺は音楽を愛してるぜ!」
 
Polite Japanese "watasi wa ongaku wo aisite masu”「私は音楽を愛してます」

or "watasi wa ongaku ga sugoku suki desu"「私は音楽がすごく好きです」 



I think I'd like to correct some misconceptions you might have regarding the language. Take it as positive criticism, because I enjoy seeing people learn Japanese. :)

The verb 愛する is used primarily on physical objects, and denotes an action of showing love rather than the psychological disposition of having love for something. We use 好き (suki) for this purpose - and since this is an adjective, we don't use the を particle with it.

Your first sentence uses the gobi ぜ, which is actually a less "Cutesy" version of the gobi ぞ. It's kinda like adding "yo!" at the end of your sentence, if you catch my drift.

In your second sentence, the conjugated form てます is a state of being, and not necessarily a polite form. In fact, you used the truncated version, making it even less polite. The whole form should be 愛しています, because the causal form omits the い, as you can see. A true "polite" form of the sentence utilizes humble speech and uncertainties. Some examples include one that I shared: 音楽が好きだと思う, but an even simpler form would be to add the です copula at the end.



Ruthenium44 wrote:

no! you can't use particle o with suki... and suki just means like, you can use daisuki (like very much) to mean love

so say,

watashi wa ongaku ga daisuki desu.

or you can just say ongaku ga daisuki if you wanna be super simple


I seem to has so much I want to say. :P

Actually, "suki" may have more of a psychologically implied meaning of "love" as compared to "daisuki". In casual speech, we prefer "suki" for affectionate love than "daisuki" because the latter has a childish sound when used to show affection, and makes things sound like the love of a kid. When it all boils down to it, however, it's a matter of context. Some people may feel just as fine showing their love by using "daisuki" over just "suki", but it all depends on the context. By default, however, "suki" may generally be preferred over "daisuki" to show "affectionate love".

When we use these words on inanimate objects, the usage can be ambiguous depending on context. I personally find people using "daisuki" on the things they like bordering obsessive, if that gives you an idea of the implied meanings when used in casual speech. Otherwise, if it were one of my girl friends who is cute, it'd come out as just a similarly cute sentence without any obsessive meanings attached. Again, it's all about the context.
Posted 7/19/11 , edited 7/19/11

edsamac wrote:

Umm... some of the submissions of people here sound so stiff and cold, albeit grammatically correct.

The simplest, most casual way would be 音楽が好き (ongaku ga suki). You can add things on to this to give out different impressions to the people around you (using gobi), like so...

Strong (somewhat manly) - 音楽が好きだ (ongaku ga suki da)

Imposing and cute (neutral, but more girlish) = 音楽が好きだぞ (ongaku ga suki da zo)

Polite (best use imho, and I use this form most of the time for almost everything) - 音楽が好きですが (ongaku ga suki desu ga)

Feminine - 音楽が好きなの (ongaku ga suki na no)

A girl who grew up in a mansion - 私、音楽が好きですが/の/わ (watakushi, ongaku ga suki desu ga/no/wa)

Manly with a hint of beating the crap out of the listener - 音楽が好きだろうが (ongaku ga suki darou ga)

Uncertain (makes one sound cute if you're a girl, but somewhat obnoxious if you're a guy. Think Koizumi.) - 音楽が好きだと思う (ongaku ga suki da to omou)


Yeah, I'm messing around a bit, but these are far more casual expressions that what I've read previously.



EDIT: as an additional note, the gobi が (ga) sounds more like "nga" when used at the end.



pu-pon wrote:

Manly Japanese "Ore wa ongaku wo aisiteru ze!" 「俺は音楽を愛してるぜ!」
 
Polite Japanese "watasi wa ongaku wo aisite masu”「私は音楽を愛してます」

or "watasi wa ongaku ga sugoku suki desu"「私は音楽がすごく好きです」 



I think I'd like to correct some misconceptions you might have regarding the language. Take it as positive criticism, because I enjoy seeing people learn Japanese. :)

The verb 愛する is used primarily on physical objects, and denotes an action of showing love rather than the psychological disposition of having love for something. We use 好き (suki) for this purpose - and since this is an adjective, we don't use the を particle with it.

Your first sentence uses the gobi ぜ, which is actually a less "Cutesy" version of the gobi ぞ. It's kinda like adding "yo!" at the end of your sentence, if you catch my drift.

In your second sentence, the conjugated form てます is a state of being, and not necessarily a polite form. In fact, you used the truncated version, making it even less polite. The whole form should be 愛しています, because the causal form omits the い, as you can see. A true "polite" form of the sentence utilizes humble speech and uncertainties. Some examples include one that I shared: 音楽が好きだと思う, but an even simpler form would be to add the です copula at the end.



Ruthenium44 wrote:

no! you can't use particle o with suki... and suki just means like, you can use daisuki (like very much) to mean love

so say,

watashi wa ongaku ga daisuki desu.

or you can just say ongaku ga daisuki if you wanna be super simple


I seem to has so much I want to say. :P

Actually, "suki" may have more of a psychologically implied meaning of "love" as compared to "daisuki". In casual speech, we prefer "suki" for affectionate love than "daisuki" because the latter has a childish sound when used to show affection, and makes things sound like the love of a kid. When it all boils down to it, however, it's a matter of context. Some people may feel just as fine showing their love by using "daisuki" over just "suki", but it all depends on the context. By default, however, "suki" may generally be preferred over "daisuki" to show "affectionate love".

When we use these words on inanimate objects, the usage can be ambiguous depending on context. I personally find people using "daisuki" on the things they like bordering obsessive, if that gives you an idea of the implied meanings when used in casual speech. Otherwise, if it were one of my girl friends who is cute, it'd come out as just a similarly cute sentence without any obsessive meanings attached. Again, it's all about the context.


Yo thanks for the explanation but could you explain more on "darou ga" and I heard guys use "zo" when they show their opinion on a matter. however "wo" may be used with "suki" such as " Doushite kimi wo suki ni natte shimatta n' darou"
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Posted 7/19/11 , edited 7/19/11

Sid-Lee wrote:

Yo thanks for the explanation but could you explain more on "darou ga" and I heard guys use "zo" when they show their opinion on a matter. however "wo" may be used with "suki" such as " Doushite kimi wo suki ni natte shimatta n' darou"


Like I said, I was messing around a bit. だろうが (darou ga) comes from the explanatory modality, which is a rougher, more direct version of でしょう. It also has a certain criticizing tone to it, so it's more often than not used by older people or those with some kind of authority. When combined with the gobi が, it can imply a certain level of "obviousness". Depending on context (and if you try saying it with a punch like some yakuza), it comes of as if you were bugged into answering, and you're just stating the obvious. Saying 音楽が好きだろうが is kinda like saying "I like music (so what about it)?" or "(and what if) I like music, eh?"

If it's kinda hard to put your finger on that, imagine saying it with the more neutral でしょう, which lacks the criticizing tone of だろう because it's actually an uncertainty form of です. When one says 音楽が好きでしょう, it comes out as "Hmm... I guess I like music." and is less imposing, and considered polite.

As for ぞ and ぜ, these are actually quite equal, and they are primarily used by men. By cute, I was referring to how I hear lots of women using these on the basis that it makes them sound cute. They tend to be picky with the words they use it with - one of the most popular many of you might be familiar with include 行くぞ! (ikuzo!), which means "let's go!" This is so generic a statement that it's practically neutral. But if you were to ask me, I find ぞ more neutral than ぜ, because the latter sounds much more "macho" and belongs to an older group of people. Some girls even bastardize ぞ and turn it into じょっ (jo~) to make it sound even cuter. So if you hear someone say 音楽が好きだじょっ, chances are it's probably a girl trying to look cute. I've heard one person try to turn ぜ into じぇっ, but honestly it sounds silly. :P

Lastly, for the を particle usage, I mentioned that as a general rule. The use of を with 好き, which if you've studied japanese you'd know is an auxiliary adjective, is ideally used with the subject particle が by default. That is because 好き in its verbal form is a psychological state of being and not necessarily an action. Strictly speaking, we don't use を with it because any action used with 好き is considered under the control of the agent, so を would be redundant. The only instance where I'd see を used with 好き are the following:

1. The subject and the agent are not the same
I see this in statements where the speaker wants to make it clear that something is beyond their control in the events to which the subject is acted upon by the agent who "likes". For example, when you hear あんたを好き, it refers to someone liking YOU, the subject. For example, あの人はあなたを好き means "The person who likes you..." You aren't the agent in this sentence, so chances are it's a generic form of something beyond your control.

2. The auxiliary verb used is in the form of a state of change
This is the example you gave. When 好き becomes a state of change, it effectively becomes a verbal noun and indicates a change towards that state. It makes sense to use を in this regard because the agent is affected by the change. However, it's more on the semantics, because using が would be just as warranted - but due to the ease of use in speech, を is preferred.

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Posted 8/3/11
なんか盛り上がってるね
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