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Why do young people place some much value on looks?
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52 / F / Atlanta GA
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Posted 9/3/10
I never really drove the point home that education is far more likely, to bring a better future. But there that saying reading and writing never taught me nothing
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24 / M / The Netherlands
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Posted 9/4/10
It's actually quite easy why people place so much value on looks, it's in my eyes all about instict off getting healthy offspring.
A young female who looks good shows of she is healthy, add a good pair of Breasts and Hips and the male instict tells males that mating with her would make for some good offspring.
Other way around is basically the same, if the male has a strong body etc it will make for a good partner and good offspring.

Ofcourse there are alot of exeptions etc.

It's all about evolution
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52 / F / Atlanta GA
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Posted 9/14/10
Looks fade and a good functional mind has a far better chance of making your way through the world. Being good looking will open all sorts of doors mostly good if you have an education. With out an education as looks fade your opportunity fades with it. That was the point i was trying to make but the vanity of the poster Just went along with the flow of surface values skin-deep.
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Posted 9/16/10
Actually, I think it's because of how much good looks are advertised these days. You open your TV, and the screen is flooded by images of people with either angelic faces or toned bodies.

In TV Shows, the good-looking guy always has his eyes on the sexy girl. How often have you seen (in Shows/Movies) a good-looking guy going gaga over someone intellectual? (minus Twilight. Not only is she not sexy, she isn't intellectual either. Special case, special case :P)

Even in the music business, looks seem to go so much further than talent. Everything is autotuned, and the main focus would be how less the artist is wearing and how much body they're showing, and how much makeup they're wearing. Male artists only sing about "that girl is fine, that girl is sexy. Oh she's undressing blabla etcetc". Not often do they sing about personality.

And even in some cases such as work! Don't good-looking people sometimes get away with things just because they're so 'dashing'?


Since the media is such a big influence on a teenager's life that we just digest all this information and spend more time worrying about looks. Eventually though, I'm sure everyone matures, but vanity still plays a huge role in a teenager's life.
Posted 9/16/10

gal69lag wrote:

Actually, I think it's because of how much good looks are advertised these days. You open your TV, and the screen is flooded by images of people with either angelic faces or toned bodies.

In TV Shows, the good-looking guy always has his eyes on the sexy girl. How often have you seen (in Shows/Movies) a good-looking guy going gaga over someone intellectual? (minus Twilight. Not only is she not sexy, she isn't intellectual either. Special case, special case :P)

Even in the music business, looks seem to go so much further than talent. Everything is autotuned, and the main focus would be how less the artist is wearing and how much body they're showing, and how much makeup they're wearing. Male artists only sing about "that girl is fine, that girl is sexy. Oh she's undressing blabla etcetc". Not often do they sing about personality.

And even in some cases such as work! Don't good-looking people sometimes get away with things just because they're so 'dashing'?


Since the media is such a big influence on a teenager's life that we just digest all this information and spend more time worrying about looks. Eventually though, I'm sure everyone matures, but vanity still plays a huge role in a teenager's life.
Wrong, the deification of youth only ended up promoting and normalizing inexperience and stupidity, not beauty and maturity.
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Posted 9/16/10

DomFortress wrote:


gal69lag wrote:

Actually, I think it's because of how much good looks are advertised these days. You open your TV, and the screen is flooded by images of people with either angelic faces or toned bodies.

In TV Shows, the good-looking guy always has his eyes on the sexy girl. How often have you seen (in Shows/Movies) a good-looking guy going gaga over someone intellectual? (minus Twilight. Not only is she not sexy, she isn't intellectual either. Special case, special case :P)

Even in the music business, looks seem to go so much further than talent. Everything is autotuned, and the main focus would be how less the artist is wearing and how much body they're showing, and how much makeup they're wearing. Male artists only sing about "that girl is fine, that girl is sexy. Oh she's undressing blabla etcetc". Not often do they sing about personality.

And even in some cases such as work! Don't good-looking people sometimes get away with things just because they're so 'dashing'?


Since the media is such a big influence on a teenager's life that we just digest all this information and spend more time worrying about looks. Eventually though, I'm sure everyone matures, but vanity still plays a huge role in a teenager's life.
Wrong, the deification of youth only ended up promoting and normalizing inexperience and stupidity, not beauty and maturity.



Do you do this on purpose? Quote me 'cuz perhaps you don't like me or something? Honestly I thought I was the one who was 16 =/

But anyways, I don't see how what I've said is wrong. No where have I spoken of the 'deification of youth' normalizing beauty and maturity. Heck, it isn't the youth that started it. Do you deny that James Bond movies will always have a sex icon as the leading lady? And the James Bond himself has to be unbelievably handsome, even if his acting talents are below par? I don't see how these guys are youthful as some of them are way in their forties. The youth has simply followed the trend, which I don't like anyway?

Lahk, srsly, I'm only saying how teenagers are influenced by TV, and here you are talking about the youth being deified.
Posted 9/16/10

gal69lag wrote:




Do you do this on purpose? Quote me 'cuz perhaps you don't like me or something? Honestly I thought I was the one who was 16 =/

But anyways, I don't see how what I've said is wrong. No where have I spoken of the 'deification of youth' normalizing beauty and maturity. Heck, it isn't the youth that started it. Do you deny that James Bond movies will always have a sex icon as the leading lady? And the James Bond himself has to be unbelievably handsome, even if his acting talents are below par? I don't see how these guys are youthful as some of them are way in their forties. The youth has simply followed the trend, which I don't like anyway?

Lahk, srsly, I'm only saying how teenagers are influenced by TV, and here you are talking about the youth being deified.
Still barking at the wrong tree, when I'm a Trekkie, not a Bond fan. My TV role model consist of matured, bald, and somewhat gay intellectual, not whatever your stereotypical viewpoint would pin me down as.
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Posted 9/16/10

DomFortress wrote:


gal69lag wrote:




Do you do this on purpose? Quote me 'cuz perhaps you don't like me or something? Honestly I thought I was the one who was 16 =/

But anyways, I don't see how what I've said is wrong. No where have I spoken of the 'deification of youth' normalizing beauty and maturity. Heck, it isn't the youth that started it. Do you deny that James Bond movies will always have a sex icon as the leading lady? And the James Bond himself has to be unbelievably handsome, even if his acting talents are below par? I don't see how these guys are youthful as some of them are way in their forties. The youth has simply followed the trend, which I don't like anyway?

Lahk, srsly, I'm only saying how teenagers are influenced by TV, and here you are talking about the youth being deified.
Still barking at the wrong tree, when I'm a Trekkie, not a Bond fan. My TV role model consist of matured, bald, and somewhat gay intellectual, not whatever your stereotypical viewpoint would pin me down as.



Haha, well then I wasn't asking for your TV role model neither was I assuming what your TV role model would be. Simply saying that anyone in Bond movies can't be counted as "youth" and those movies are an example of the 'glorifying' of good looks.
Posted 9/16/10

gal69lag wrote:


DomFortress wrote:


gal69lag wrote:




Do you do this on purpose? Quote me 'cuz perhaps you don't like me or something? Honestly I thought I was the one who was 16 =/

But anyways, I don't see how what I've said is wrong. No where have I spoken of the 'deification of youth' normalizing beauty and maturity. Heck, it isn't the youth that started it. Do you deny that James Bond movies will always have a sex icon as the leading lady? And the James Bond himself has to be unbelievably handsome, even if his acting talents are below par? I don't see how these guys are youthful as some of them are way in their forties. The youth has simply followed the trend, which I don't like anyway?

Lahk, srsly, I'm only saying how teenagers are influenced by TV, and here you are talking about the youth being deified.
Still barking at the wrong tree, when I'm a Trekkie, not a Bond fan. My TV role model consist of matured, bald, and somewhat gay intellectual, not whatever your stereotypical viewpoint would pin me down as.



Haha, well then I wasn't asking for your TV role model neither was I assuming what your TV role model would be. Simply saying that anyone in Bond movies can't be counted as "youth" and those movies are an example of the 'glorifying' of good looks.
And what exactly is wrong with that? What's wrong to dignify and honor whatever that's "good looking"? Thus normalizes a standard of good values. You sounded to me like you're someone who's against the values of "good looks", and if so, why?
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Posted 9/16/10

DomFortress wrote:


gal69lag wrote:


DomFortress wrote:


gal69lag wrote:




Do you do this on purpose? Quote me 'cuz perhaps you don't like me or something? Honestly I thought I was the one who was 16 =/

But anyways, I don't see how what I've said is wrong. No where have I spoken of the 'deification of youth' normalizing beauty and maturity. Heck, it isn't the youth that started it. Do you deny that James Bond movies will always have a sex icon as the leading lady? And the James Bond himself has to be unbelievably handsome, even if his acting talents are below par? I don't see how these guys are youthful as some of them are way in their forties. The youth has simply followed the trend, which I don't like anyway?

Lahk, srsly, I'm only saying how teenagers are influenced by TV, and here you are talking about the youth being deified.
Still barking at the wrong tree, when I'm a Trekkie, not a Bond fan. My TV role model consist of matured, bald, and somewhat gay intellectual, not whatever your stereotypical viewpoint would pin me down as.



Haha, well then I wasn't asking for your TV role model neither was I assuming what your TV role model would be. Simply saying that anyone in Bond movies can't be counted as "youth" and those movies are an example of the 'glorifying' of good looks.
And what exactly is wrong with that? What's wrong to dignify and honor whatever that's "good looking"? Thus normalizes a standard of good values. You sounded to me like you're someone who's against the values of "good looks", and if so, why?



Psh. You're just not getting the point here. I'm saying, teenagers such as myself, value good looks (which was the original question) because we are influenced by the media.

Now what I think about how media portrays good looks is something completely different. So often have I seen teenagers not that good-looking being put down and insulted by other teenagers just because of that. The youth, like you said, is inexperienced and immature. I myself value good looks, but I'm sick and tired of how majestic a character is portrayed just because they were blessed by good-looks, and someone who was less fortunate is expressed as a loner. Teenagers pick this up and the ones that see themselves as 'good-looking' force their authority on others and the ones that think of themselves as ugly dig themselves into a hole. It has even led to suicide in some cases. I just wish the media could for once express that looks isnt everything.
Posted 9/16/10 , edited 9/16/10

gal69lag wrote:




Psh. You're just not getting the point here. I'm saying, teenagers such as myself, value good looks (which was the original question) because we are influenced by the media.

Now what I think about how media portrays good looks is something completely different. So often have I seen teenagers not that good-looking being put down and insulted by other teenagers just because of that. The youth, like you said, is inexperienced and immature. I myself value good looks, but I'm sick and tired of how majestic a character is portrayed just because they were blessed by good-looks, and someone who was less fortunate is expressed as a loner. Teenagers pick this up and the ones that see themselves as 'good-looking' force their authority on others and the ones that think of themselves as ugly dig themselves into a hole. It has even led to suicide in some cases. I just wish the media could for once express that looks isnt everything.
It's not my fault that kids these days don't watch high quality programs like Star Trek anymore. You would think that people who compete for the best looking Klingon could care less about acting normal, much less being beautiful.

Now can you truly see just how foolish it is to objectify real beauty without good health? When looking beautifully is subjective to change, based on whatever that's culturally defined as the social norms.
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Posted 9/17/10
i thought erikson said that that is pretty much normal. It is not about the appearance but the identity
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20 / F / In lalaland~
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Posted 9/17/10

DomFortress wrote:


gal69lag wrote:




Psh. You're just not getting the point here. I'm saying, teenagers such as myself, value good looks (which was the original question) because we are influenced by the media.

Now what I think about how media portrays good looks is something completely different. So often have I seen teenagers not that good-looking being put down and insulted by other teenagers just because of that. The youth, like you said, is inexperienced and immature. I myself value good looks, but I'm sick and tired of how majestic a character is portrayed just because they were blessed by good-looks, and someone who was less fortunate is expressed as a loner. Teenagers pick this up and the ones that see themselves as 'good-looking' force their authority on others and the ones that think of themselves as ugly dig themselves into a hole. It has even led to suicide in some cases. I just wish the media could for once express that looks isnt everything.
It's not my fault that kids these days don't watch high quality programs like Star Trek anymore. You would think that people who compete for the best looking Klingon could care less about acting normal, much less being beautiful.

Now can you truly see just how foolish it is to objectify real beauty without good health? When looking beautifully is subjective to change, based on whatever that's culturally defined as the social norms.


Yeah okay, Star Trek is from what century? What teenager watches that anymore (except for some)? And then there's the new Star Trek where, again, the cast is full of beautiful people.

We watch what's on TV and all that's on TV is shows and movies about high school drama and whatnot. That's why I said that even though we value looks so much during our high school years, as the years go on we grow out of that phase. 'Beautiful' is subjective to change, but whatever is accepted as beautiful will be put up on a pedestal time and time again.
Posted 9/17/10

gal69lag wrote:


DomFortress wrote:

It's not my fault that kids these days don't watch high quality programs like Star Trek anymore. You would think that people who compete for the best looking Klingon could care less about acting normal, much less being beautiful.

Now can you truly see just how foolish it is to objectify real beauty without good health? When looking beautifully is subjective to change, based on whatever that's culturally defined as the social norms.


Yeah okay, Star Trek is from what century? What teenager watches that anymore (except for some)? And then there's the new Star Trek where, again, the cast is full of beautiful people.

We watch what's on TV and all that's on TV is shows and movies about high school drama and whatnot.
That's why I said that even though we value looks so much during our high school years, as the years go on we grow out of that phase. 'Beautiful' is subjective to change, but whatever is accepted as beautiful will be put up on a pedestal time and time again.
Why do you think I placed that comment in bold in the first place? What's empirically to be healthy is objectively desirable from nature's perspective, when anything that's subjective to change because it's the nature of abstract thoughts, aka ideas. Thereby as a fitness trainer, I see beauty in health and fitness. As a lover, I see beauty in my partner. As an individualist, I see beauty in individuality. As a Trekkie, I see beauty in diversity. I'm only as young as how I feel, but for someone feeling sick and tired about what's beautiful, what does that say about them? A lack of passion.
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Posted 9/17/10

DomFortress wrote:


gal69lag wrote:


DomFortress wrote:

It's not my fault that kids these days don't watch high quality programs like Star Trek anymore. You would think that people who compete for the best looking Klingon could care less about acting normal, much less being beautiful.

Now can you truly see just how foolish it is to objectify real beauty without good health? When looking beautifully is subjective to change, based on whatever that's culturally defined as the social norms.


Yeah okay, Star Trek is from what century? What teenager watches that anymore (except for some)? And then there's the new Star Trek where, again, the cast is full of beautiful people.

We watch what's on TV and all that's on TV is shows and movies about high school drama and whatnot.
That's why I said that even though we value looks so much during our high school years, as the years go on we grow out of that phase. 'Beautiful' is subjective to change, but whatever is accepted as beautiful will be put up on a pedestal time and time again.
Why do you think I placed that comment in bold in the first place? What's empirically to be healthy is objectively desirable from nature's perspective, when anything that's subjective to change because it's the nature of abstract thoughts, aka ideas. Thereby as a fitness trainer, I see beauty in health and fitness. As a lover, I see beauty in my partner. As an individualist, I see beauty in individuality. As a Trekkie, I see beauty in diversity. I'm only as young as how I feel, but for someone feeling sick and tired about what's beautiful, what does that say about them? A lack of passion.



And YOU are not GETTING it. I'm not 'sick and tired' of what's beautiful, I'm sick and tired of the media's portrayal of beauty. Superficial beauty and not inner beauty.
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