Anime and the American audience
Posted 11/2/10
Japan is the home of excellent storytelling. As an American who watches Anime, I get something that is seriously lacking from our own art form of media. Well thought out stories that because they are drawn have few limitations in special effect production- you want a massive army in space you draw a massive army in space. It frees the story tellers up to actually develop continuous story arcs and produce hundreds of episodes without the overhead that we have in our live action media.

Excellent series like Naruto, Bleach, and One Piece keep a lot of us happy but they are getting long in the tooth and eventually they will end. Looking among the other current series that are out there you will be hard pressed to find something that is going to match that experience. Here may be the counterculture backlash- what we have grown to love and even been cultivated to enjoy may not be what Japan produces in the future.

The audience of watchers grows older and what we want as a group will eventually splinter as newer younger viewers step in to add to the pool of the audience. As an older member of the audience, 29 as of this writing, I wonder will the art form grow with me or like old loony toons cartoons will I eventually experience a disconnect?

As far as I know series like Monster or Legends of the Galactic Heros could be anomalies- welcome ones but who knows? There are the smaller series that get spun out, which are wonderful but they don't fill in a gap like watching Naruto or One piece does.

I sometimes wonder, will we be able to have enough organized viewing to one day actually affect Japan's Anime? Will we be able to, with our viewing support in this Internet medium keep excellent series alive and funded when many that have a lot of promise sputter out due to lack of funding or not enough viewers on the regular television time slot?

The same could be said for or American media, there are shows like Terminator or Firefly that you wish we had the kind of video hub that we do today and enough income generating demand to keep original fresh entertainment from quickly going the way of the dinosaurs or in our more recent history the koala.

Is there only room enough for two or three good series at a time, is the demand for this art form growing weaker/less profitable, is the economy at large the reason, or maybe we have a lack of skilled storytellers?

I'd like to think there will be more good things out there for us to discover. Much like how we are seeing indie films and free and sometimes good quality open source or casual web games... see new independent groups find it easier to break into our viewing range. I want to see anime be more than a "cartoon from Japan" .

Maybe some of that gets figured out here, we have a platform. It is the best one out there. Netflix and hulu try but they don't have the community. So in the end I guess that rests on the feasibility of the demand from us and how Crunchyroll plays its cards, being a trailblazer or being bought out by one of the media groups.

It's not going to be often that we find ourselves in a digital revolution of media demand, where we can gather ourselves together and affect the course of a medium that previously was untouched by the voices outside of its own soil. It's exciting but boy it can make you anxious. :)

(credit to fathem)
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Posted 11/2/10 , edited 11/2/10
I believe that anime will inevitably evolve. All media does. That's not really something feel threatened by however. I can re watch and enjoy my old Robotech DVDs just as easily as I can relish the latest streaming episode of The World God Only Knows.

It's the medium many enjoy, regardless of how diverse the stories themselves may end up being. That's something that was already touched on above.

As for the ability of the American consumer to affect the overseas market? Well, they are calling this a world economy these days. Maybe its not so far off as we think.
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Posted 11/2/10
uhhh can this be summarized? most people probably won't read this lol
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Posted 11/2/10
well i reached to naurto and bleach and i went ok this is crap. too long and it make no sense to me i am not american XD
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Posted 11/2/10 , edited 11/2/10
Even though it is a bit difficult for Anime to exist here where copyright laws are so strict, I'll be happy and satisfied as long as I see what I want whatever means necessary. Although I kind of wish licensed DVDs were a lot cheaper than they are now but I blame this economy for that.
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Posted 11/2/10

otakumedium25 wrote:

Even though it is a bit difficult for Anime to exist here where copyright laws are so strict, I'll be happy and satisfied as long as I see what I want whatever means necessary. Although I kind of wish licensed DVDs were a lot cheaper than they are now but I blame this economy for that.


It could also be that the cost of it been dub, or having subs make it more expensive.
I dont get DVDs since I tend to not take care of DVDs that much :sweatingbullets:, after a year or so I start to see scratchs for some apparent reason.

Instead I buy anime eps from iTunes, iTunes needs to put episodes with both sub and dub though, I may start buying eps online from Funimation but they only have .wmv format(window media video) which means that I would only be able to watch them on my computer and I prefer .m4v (aka .mp4(video)) since I can watch them on my ipod nano, and later my itouch 4 gen(whenever I decide to buy it)

I also watch anime online or rent the dvd from netflix,
Or watch anime online at Hulu.com, Funimation.com, Crunchyroll.com . and TheAnimeNetwork.com
fathem 
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Posted 11/3/10
Sorry for the longwindedness Xfancy :)

Basically there are a few really popular anime series out there. I personally haven't seen anything that would fill their places or come alongside them in this current season. I'm talking about long running series here, We still seem to have a healthy amount of short running shows that have a planned story arc.

Along those lines I was wondering what is going to affect the future of anime, will the buying/ad power of America play a role?
Also as the anime market ages will the entertainment/artform develop with us or will it primarily target the youth audience?
Naruto is a good example of a series that is growing up.

Hope that is helpful!

Thanks Stareye for posting this for me.
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