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Difference between "otaku" and "weeaboo".
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21 / F / London Below
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Posted 11/27/10 , edited 11/27/10


It really is going better. And, honestly, I feel that it is a matter of how one percieves the word, as, it seems open to many interpretations. (For example I think of two defintions of 'Otaku', one being the defention it received as being a part of American slang, and the other being the original meaning.)

Also, there is more to a Weeaboo then just that (I know, I know one), many, many people can watch anime, read manga, respect the culture and learn the language just because they enjoy it. Personally, I can be picky about anime, and it has to interest me to watch it, I don't watch it just because "it's Japanese" To me, Weeaboos are the type who just abuse the culture and like things just because they're from Japan. Nothing wrong with a few imports either (As long as you're not extreme about it), I too want some items, but only because I think they're interesting or they're from series I like. Many people do the same in other fandoms. (Just as I also like Disney Princess (Particularly, Ariel) and have two or three of those items around.) (I also admit to playing two Japanese games, but only because an aquaintance lent them to me for one night, and they were fun.)

As for the media thing, I admit to sometimes shunning some American Media (I'm talking crazy marketing, dumb commercials and their habit of blowing things way out of proportion etc.)-but it goes for international Media as well. Also, because I'm against what child marketing has become, and it makes me look at the media differently. Plus any and all media is just out of hand sometimes, but that's beside the point.

*Side Note* I don't understand the whole subbed vs. dubbed thing, there are some good subbed anime and some good dubs, just as their are bad subs and dubs. (Depending on the company and voice acting quality.) I mean, I can watch my all-time favorite anime in Japanese, English and Italian, because I enjoy all three of those versions. (And love Italian voice acting.)

All of that aside, I found this to be a good topic for discussion and to see how other people percieve these two defenitions.


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18 / F / Houston,Texas,U.S.A
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Posted 11/27/10
Reading this I became all sad to learn, I am a huge weeaboo! Well mostly. I still have a few american shows I watch like glee and saturday night live but I sadly have fallen into a world where I many times wish I was japanese and accidently say stuff in Japanese. I mean i don't CURSE my heritage, I just wish to be Japanese. I mean I don't use japanese words in front of my friends...at least not much. I seriously considered myself to just be an otaku. Well I don't collect manga I just read it. I have friends and I do go out and im not a boyfriends-less not hot person here. I'm just someone who overly enjoys anime alright?
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17 / F
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Posted 11/28/10
Since I started to get into anime and manga, I've began to become familiar with Japan's music and food.
But I really don't know anything about Japan other than those things I'm interested in, and I really couldn't care less if I was Japanese or not. With me, it's just interest. I wouldn't consider myself a weeaboo or an full-fledged otaku (yet). But, anime is the only thing I really care about and put my heart into in life.
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34 / M / CT
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Posted 11/28/10
Japan has got a lot of interesting things goin' on, but I certainly don't resent my non-japanese blood.

Weeaboo's, or however it is spelled, need to... well, I don't know what they need to do - but they need to do something.

So....

Weeaboo is to Japan, as Wigger is to Contemporary Hip-Hop Culture?
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20 / M / Minnesota, USA
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Posted 11/30/10
@LostButterflyUtau, yeah I don't watch anime just because it's Japanese either. If the story doesn't interest me, I won't want to watch it. "Mr. One Piece" however thinks I watch random anime because it's anime. The same applies to manga. The only stuff I'd really import are the Japanese versions of series I like and some Japan versions of video games that I like or are exclusive to Japan.
@animefreak354, you I would consider to be an otaku at the border between otakudom and weeaboodom. Though everyone pretty much grows out of that phase usually of being a little weeabooish.
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25 / F / Georgia
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Posted 11/30/10
I didn't know people actually compared the two terms.
Although their definitions are similar, they're not the same thing. At least I think so.
Posted 11/30/10 , edited 11/30/10
I'm getting confused here since people keep saying
weeaboos is this... otaku is that... and otaku are weeaboos... blah.. blah.. blah...blah...
can anyone tell me what's the accurate term here?

I decided to contribute to this topic a little about what is a "weeaboo" and "Otaku" is....

just in case your too lazy for research

Weeaboo: It's seems that the word weeaboo was a replacement word for wapanese (a slang term for a Westernener obsessed with japanese culture)

Japanophilia is an interest in, or love of, Japan and all things Japanese. (Its opposite is Japanophobia.) One who has such an interest or love is a Japanophile.

In the late 18th and early 19th centuries, Carl Peter Thunberg and Philipp Franz von Siebold, who stayed in the Dutch outpost of Dejima, helped introduce Japanese flora, artworks, and other objects to Europe. Some consider them to be among the earliest Japanophiles.[2][3] (This was before the Meiji Restoration in 1868, when Japan became more open to foreign trade.)

Lafcadio Hearn, an Irish-Greek author who made his home in Japan in the 19th century, was described to be "a confirmed Japanophile" by Charles E. Tuttle Company in their foreword to most of his books.

In the first decade of the 20th century, British writers were lauding Japan. In 1904, for example, Beatrice Webb wrote that Japan was a "rising star of human self-control and enlightenment", praising the "innovating collectivism" of the Japanese, and the "uncanny" purposefulness and open-mindedness of its "enlightened professional elite". H. G. Wells similarly named the élite of his A Modern Utopia "samurai". In part this was a result of British industrial decline, with Japan and Germany rising at the same time. Germany was seen as a threat close to hand, but Japan was seen as an ally. The British sought efficiency as the solution, and after the publication of Alfred Stead's 1906 book Great Japan: A Study of National Efficiency, pundits in Britain looked to Japan for lessons. This interest ended with World War I.

The United States went through a similar period of Japanophilia starting in the 1980s, anticipated in the 1960s by the writing of Peter Drucker, who pointed to the "consensual decision-making" in Japanese corporations and celebrated Japanese corporate management techniques (even claiming credit for giving this system to the Japanese via his books and seminars). During that period, American students took Japanese language classes with the hope of doing business with Japan. This was also a decade in which numerous shows from Japan, such as Voltron, were being dubbed and shown on American television; this phenomenon accelerated in the 1990s with shows like Power Rangers, Sailor Moon and Pokémon.[/green}

seems weeaboos has a lot of history

On to the Otaku bit

Otaku:is a Japanese term used to refer to people with obsessive interests, particularly anime, manga, or video games

Otaku is derived from a Japanese term for another's house or family (お宅, otaku) which is also used as an honorific second-person pronoun. The modern slang form, which is distinguished from the older usage by being written only in hiragana (おたく) or katakana (オタク or, less frequently, ヲタク), or rarely in rōmaji, appeared in the 1980s. In the anime Macross, first aired in 1982, the term was used by Lynn Minmay as an honorific term.[1][2] It appears to have been coined by the humorist and essayist Akio Nakamori in his 1983 series An Investigation of "Otaku" (『おたく』の研究, "Otaku" no Kenkyū?), printed in the lolicon magazine Manga Burikko. Animators like Haruhiko Mikimoto and Shōji Kawamori used the term among themselves as an honorific second-person pronoun since the late 1970s.[2]

Another source for the term comes from the works of science fiction author Motoko Arai. In his book Wrong about Japan, Peter Carey interviews the novelist, artist and Gundam chronicler Yuka Minakawa. She reveals that Arai used the word in her novels as a second-person pronoun, and the readers adopted the term for themselves.

n modern Japanese slang, the term otaku refers to a fan of any particular theme, topic, or hobby. Common uses are anime otaku (a fan of anime), cosplay otaku and manga otaku (a fan of Japanese graphic novels), pasokon otaku (personal computer geeks), gēmu otaku (playing video games), and wota (pronounced 'ota', previously referred to as "idol otaku") that are extreme fans of idols, heavily promoted singing girls. There are also tetsudō otaku or denshamania (railfans) or gunji otaku (military geeks).

While these are the most common uses, the word can be applied to anything (music otaku, martial arts otaku, cooking otaku, etc.).

The loan-words maniakku or mania (from the English "maniac" and "mania") are sometimes used in relation to specialist hobbies and interests. They can indicate someone with otaku leanings. (For example, Gundam Mania would describe a person who is very interested in the anime series Gundam). They can also describe the focus of such interests (a maniakku gēmu would be a particularly underground or eccentric game appealing primarily to otaku). The nuance of maniakku in Japanese is softer and less likely to cause offense than otaku.

Some of Japan's otaku use the term to describe themselves and their friends semi-humorously, accepting their position as fans, and some even use the term proudly, attempting to reclaim it from its negative connotations. In general colloquial usage however, most Japanese would consider it undesirable to be described in a serious fashion as "otaku"; many even consider it to be an offensive term.

An interesting modern look into the otaku culture has surfaced with an allegedly true story surfacing on the largest internet bulletin board 2channel: "Densha Otoko" or "Train Man", a love story about a geek and a beautiful woman who meet on a train. The story has enjoyed a compilation in novel form, several comic book adaptations, a movie released in June 2005, a theme song Love Parade for this movie by a popular Japanese band named Orange Range and a television series that aired on Fuji TV from June to September 2005. The drama has become another hot topic in Japan, and the novel, film and television series give a closer look into the otaku culture. In Japan its popularity and positive portrayal of the main character has helped to reduce negative stereotypes about otaku, and increase the acceptability of some otaku hobbies.

A subset of otaku are the Akiba-kei, men who spend a lot of time in Akihabara in Tokyo and who are mainly obsessive about anime, idols and games. Sometimes the term is used to describe something pertaining to the subculture that surrounds anime, idols and games in Japan. This subculture places an emphasis on certain services (see fanservice) and has its own system for judgment of anime, dating simulations and/or role-playing games and some manga (often dōjinshi) based upon the level of fanservice in the work. Another popular criterion — how ideal the female protagonist of the show is — is often characterized by a level of stylized cuteness and child-like behavior (see moe). In addition, this subculture places great emphasis on knowledge of individual key animators and directors and of minute details within works. The international subculture is influenced by the Japanese one, but differs in many areas often based upon region. (See also: Superflat, Hiroki Azuma.)

On the matter, in recent years "idol otaku" are naming themselves simply as Wota (ヲタ) as a way to differentiate from traditional otaku. The word was derived by dropping the last mora, leaving ota (オタ) and then replacing o (オ) with the identically sounding character wo (ヲ), leaving the pronunciation unchanged.

When otaku are studied, female otaku are largely ignored.Reki-jo are female otaku interested in Japanese history


Source from wikipedia

P.S.
Why the word "japanese" word need correcting? :S

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28 / M / N. Charleston SC
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Posted 11/30/10
Weeabos need help i dont think i could be like dat otakus r raw
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18 / F / Fortree City, Hoenn
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Posted 1/24/12
Otakus and Weaboos are nerds and losers. Weaboos are totally shameless outcasts.
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Posted 1/24/12 , edited 1/24/12
Ugh, "real" otakus make me sick.

Edit: Oh wait never mind I was thinking of Neet
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20 / M / ZA WARUDO or Stra...
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Posted 1/24/12 , edited 1/24/12
I suppose some weabos are close minded hence the resentment towards them. It's normal for people to have hobbies if it makes them elated as long as it doesn't cause anybody significant harm. Whatever type a person maybe, they will always have some form of annoyance directed to them be it "otaku", "cool", "normal", etc.
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not sharing my asl
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Posted 1/24/12
""Weeaboo" is an insult because of this. "

So who would admit that they are a weeaboo? >_>
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21 / F / United Kingdom
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Posted 1/25/12
Otaku is a fan of anime.

Weeaboo is a stupid term trolls made up to insult people.
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Posted 1/25/12

eclair-lumiere wrote:

Otaku is a fan of anime.

Weeaboo is a stupid term trolls made up to insult people.


:O But... but... weeaboo is a real thing! They really exist!
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Posted 1/25/12


In your opinion. But weeaboo is just a word trolls made up. Because they like insulting people.
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