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Post Reply What Device do You Want Crunchyroll On?
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Posted 11/3/12
Thanks! I realized that after I posted as well!
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53 / M / Northeast Ohio, USA
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Posted 11/3/12
Since people have repeated Xbox and PS Vita, two which Crunchyroll has to do development for and has announced they are working on ...

... let me repeat Nook Color / Tablet / HD / HD+. The Android app works fine on the Nook Color, so its just a matter of making the bigger icon that the Nook home launcher uses, and applying to Barnes and Noble.
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Posted 11/3/12

agila61 wrote:

Since people have repeated Xbox and PS Vita, two which Crunchyroll has to do development for and has announced they are working on ...

... let me repeat Nook Color / Tablet / HD / HD+. The Android app works fine on the Nook Color, so its just a matter of making the bigger icon that the Nook home launcher uses, and applying to Barnes and Noble.



I'm just wondering, but can you side-load apps onto the Nook tablets like you can with the Kindle Fire?
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Posted 11/4/12
Apple TV!
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Posted 11/4/12

-Chris311- wrote:

agila61 wrote: Since people have repeated Xbox and PS Vita, two which Crunchyroll has to do development for and has announced they are working on ...

... let me repeat Nook Color / Tablet / HD / HD+. The Android app works fine on the Nook Color, so its just a matter of making the bigger icon that the Nook home launcher uses, and applying to Barnes and Noble.

I'm just wondering, but can you side-load apps onto the Nook tablets like you can with the Kindle Fire?


You have to root them ("jailbreak" them in Apple terms). The "allow third party apps" setting is not available without rooting

xda-developers has developed rooting scripts for the Nook Color and Nook Tablet. There's no word whether there will be efforts to develop scripts to root the Nook HD and HD+ ~ its possible that B&N made it harder to root those (they made it harder to root the Tablet than the Color), and it depends on whether a developer with the skills to root it also has the interest.

Its harder to install Google apps on the Tablet than the Color and get the Google Play store working, so the Nook Tablet root comes with the Amazon Android app store and the Getjar app store. Both have versions of the Crunchyroll app, but the Amazon version is quite old, and the Getjar version is even older (Crunchyroll does not update their secondary Android stores every six months with the most recent mature stable release).

Also, the Nook HD/HD+ are designed to be the "family" tablet with up to six individualized accounts, and sometimes Crunchyroll members won't be in a position to root the device.

The B&N tablets have always been the ones with the best screens in their class, and they maintained that with their HD line, with a 1440x900 in the 7in HD and 1920x1280 in the 9in HD+. Add the video content from the XBox Live store in their "Nook Video" store, and they've probably leapfrogged Amazon and Apple to the best video rental/own download selection.

Since Crunchyroll doesn't really have to DO any extra development work to put up a general Color/Tablet/HD app, they just need to submit their app to the B&N store, it makes sense to make it as easy to get the Crunchyroll app on the Nook media tablet devices as possible. If the HD/HD+ are a hit, they probably ought to consider submitting an HD app for the HD/HD+, once they get 720p streaming on an Android HD app.
The Wise Wizard
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Posted 11/4/12

agila61 wrote:
The B&N tablets have always been the ones with the best screens in their class, and they maintained that with their HD line, with a 1440x900 in the 7in HD and 1920x1280 in the 9in HD+. Add the video content from the XBox Live store in their "Nook Video" store, and they've probably leapfrogged Amazon and Apple to the best video rental/own download selection.

I think you overlooked the Nexus 10: 2560 × 1600 on a 10.1 screen.

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Posted 11/4/12

TheAncientOne wrote: I think you overlooked the Nexus 10: 2560 × 1600 on a 10.1 screen.

No, I excluded it up front, when I said "best in class". The Nook Tablet was not the best tablet display anywhere: the $500 Apple iPad, for instance, has a higher resolution display. It was the best in class, though, with the same resolution as the Kindle Fire and better color range and brightness.

A $400 16Gb 10in tablet is not in the same class as a $270 16GB - $300 32Gb 9in tablet.

Indeed, B&N surely breathed a sigh of relief when the iPad Mini was brought out at $330, leaving the entire Nook product range underneath the new iPad starting price point.

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Posted 11/4/12
I really want a Metro App for Windows 8.

Sincé there is already an app for Windows Phone, a Windows 8 App could be based on that. Also, the imminent launch of Windows Phone 8 means that, unless Crunchyroll wants to stop supporting the Windows Phone environment, it needs to launch a new Windows Phone 8 / Windows 8 App (if you have one, you have the other, they are programmed the same)
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Posted 11/4/12 , edited 11/4/12

alejandronova wrote:

I really want a Metro App for Windows 8.

Sincé there is already an app for Windows Phone, a Windows 8 App could be based on that. Also, the imminent launch of Windows Phone 8 means that, unless Crunchyroll wants to stop supporting the Windows Phone environment, it needs to launch a new Windows Phone 8 / Windows 8 App (if you have one, you have the other, they are programmed the same)



No, they aren't the same. Windows 8 and Windows Phone 8 are completely different operating systems based upon completely different native code and instruction sets for two completely different platforms. WIndows 8 = x86 and x64 while Windows Phone 8 = ARM. The difference between Windows 8 and Windows Phone 8 is just as big a difference as Windows 8 and Mac OS X. (Although, Windows 8 and Mac OS X are actually closer as they both support the same platforms)


Windows RT on the other hand is ARM based and built upon Windows Phone 8, basically a tablet version of WP8. An app for Windows RT can be built upon a Windows Phone 8 app because they share native code and instruction sets as well as running on the same kind of platform.
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Posted 11/4/12
I'm really repeating what I saw in some Windows pages, but, as far as I know, Windows Phone / Windows 8 Metro apps are written in some sort of interpreted language. What you say would be true if the App were coded, say, in C, but interpreted languages like XNA or .NET are really interpreted or compiled in the host machine, so a Windows 8 version of a Windows Phone 8 App would be, at most, a recompile away.

It's the same thing, although at a different scale, you get with Linux. There are ARM Linux distros with all the software of their x86 counterparts (except those software pieces with assembler optimizations), with only a recompilation and some patches. Fedora Linux does that, AFAIK.
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Posted 11/4/12

alejandronova wrote:

I'm really repeating what I saw in some Windows pages, but, as far as I know, Windows Phone / Windows 8 Metro apps are written in some sort of interpreted language. What you say would be true if the App were coded, say, in C, but interpreted languages like XNA or .NET are really interpreted or compiled in the host machine, so a Windows 8 version of a Windows Phone 8 App would be, at most, a recompile away.

It's the same thing, although at a different scale, you get with Linux. There are ARM Linux distros with all the software of their x86 counterparts (except those software pieces with assembler optimizations), with only a recompilation and some patches. Fedora Linux does that, AFAIK.




You are talking about using Virtual Machines, which work, but are slow and take up more system resources that if natively written.

Many Android apps are ran in Adobe Air which is a VM, but those apps aren't the most efficient or smoothest either.
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Posted 11/4/12

-Chris311- wrote:


alejandronova wrote:

I'm really repeating what I saw in some Windows pages, but, as far as I know, Windows Phone / Windows 8 Metro apps are written in some sort of interpreted language. What you say would be true if the App were coded, say, in C, but interpreted languages like XNA or .NET are really interpreted or compiled in the host machine, so a Windows 8 version of a Windows Phone 8 App would be, at most, a recompile away.

It's the same thing, although at a different scale, you get with Linux. There are ARM Linux distros with all the software of their x86 counterparts (except those software pieces with assembler optimizations), with only a recompilation and some patches. Fedora Linux does that, AFAIK.




You are talking about using Virtual Machines, which work, but are slow and take up more system resources that if natively written.

Many Android apps are ran in Adobe Air which is a VM, but those apps aren't the most efficient or smoothest either.



No. I'm speaking about this: [source: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/apps/jj679957 ]

"A Windows Store app is a new type of app that is sold in the Windows Store and runs on Windows 8 devices. They install easily and uninstall cleanly. They run in a single window that fills the entire screen by default. They automatically work with a variety of input sources, including touch, pen, mouse, and keyboard. Instead of static icons, they use live tiles that can display notifications. You can write Windows Store apps in a variety of languages, such as C# and Visual Basic with XAML, C++ with XAML or DirectX, and JavaScript with HTML/CSS."

JavaScript with HTML/CSS, as you know, doesn't need compiling and will easily work in a x86, ARM or whatever environment. C#, and Visual Basic with XAML, compiles in the host machine with the .NET compilers, supplied with every copy of Windows 8 or Windows RT. The only thing that requires a recompile from the dev team (not a rewrite) is the C++ alternative, with XAML or DirectX.

Since the APIs are the same, a Windows 8 App and a Windows Phone 8 App is one and the same, and only needs to adjust to the different aspect ratio and screen size. This doesn't apply, however, to Windows Phone 7.
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Posted 11/4/12

alejandronova wrote:


-Chris311- wrote:


alejandronova wrote:

I'm really repeating what I saw in some Windows pages, but, as far as I know, Windows Phone / Windows 8 Metro apps are written in some sort of interpreted language. What you say would be true if the App were coded, say, in C, but interpreted languages like XNA or .NET are really interpreted or compiled in the host machine, so a Windows 8 version of a Windows Phone 8 App would be, at most, a recompile away.

It's the same thing, although at a different scale, you get with Linux. There are ARM Linux distros with all the software of their x86 counterparts (except those software pieces with assembler optimizations), with only a recompilation and some patches. Fedora Linux does that, AFAIK.




You are talking about using Virtual Machines, which work, but are slow and take up more system resources that if natively written.

Many Android apps are ran in Adobe Air which is a VM, but those apps aren't the most efficient or smoothest either.



No. I'm speaking about this: [source: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/apps/jj679957 ]

"A Windows Store app is a new type of app that is sold in the Windows Store and runs on Windows 8 devices. They install easily and uninstall cleanly. They run in a single window that fills the entire screen by default. They automatically work with a variety of input sources, including touch, pen, mouse, and keyboard. Instead of static icons, they use live tiles that can display notifications. You can write Windows Store apps in a variety of languages, such as C# and Visual Basic with XAML, C++ with XAML or DirectX, and JavaScript with HTML/CSS."

JavaScript with HTML/CSS, as you know, doesn't need compiling and will easily work in a x86, ARM or whatever environment. C#, and Visual Basic with XAML, compiles in the host machine with the .NET compilers, supplied with every copy of Windows 8 or Windows RT. The only thing that requires a recompile from the dev team (not a rewrite) is the C++ alternative, with XAML or DirectX.

Since the APIs are the same, a Windows 8 App and a Windows Phone 8 App is one and the same, and only needs to adjust to the different aspect ratio and screen size. This doesn't apply, however, to Windows Phone 7.



.Net is a VM like Adobe Air. It compiles on the fly.
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Posted 11/4/12
Those are details. The fact is: if you have a Windows Phone 8 App, you have a Windows 8 Metro App. So, if the Crunchyroll gods are looking upon us, they'll know how easy is to port their already functioning Windows Phone 7 App into Windows Phone 8 / Windows 8 / Windows RT.

BTW, don't confuse a VM (like VirtualBox) with a JIT compiler.
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Posted 11/4/12 , edited 11/4/12

alejandronova wrote:

Those are details. The fact is: if you have a Windows Phone 8 App, you have a Windows 8 Metro App. So, if the Crunchyroll gods are looking upon us, they'll know how easy is to port their already functioning Windows Phone 7 App into Windows Phone 8 / Windows 8 / Windows RT.

BTW, don't confuse a VM (like VirtualBox) with a JIT compiler.



I'm not confusing anything with a JIT compiler


Process virtual machines
See also: Application virtualization, Run-time system, and Comparison of application virtual machines

A process VM, sometimes called an application virtual machine, runs as a normal application inside a host OS and supports a single process. It is created when that process is started and destroyed when it exits. Its purpose is to provide a platform-independent programming environment that abstracts away details of the underlying hardware or operating system, and allows a program to execute in the same way on any platform.

A process VM provides a high-level abstraction — that of a high-level programming language (compared to the low-level ISA abstraction of the system VM). Process VMs are implemented using an interpreter; performance comparable to compiled programming languages is achieved by the use of just-in-time compilation.

This type of VM has become popular with the Java programming language, which is implemented using the Java virtual machine. Other examples include the Parrot virtual machine, which serves as an abstraction layer for several interpreted languages, and the .NET Framework, which runs on a VM called the Common Language Runtime.

A special case of process VMs are systems that abstract over the communication mechanisms of a (potentially heterogeneous) computer cluster. Such a VM does not consist of a single process, but one process per physical machine in the cluster. They are designed to ease the task of programming parallel applications by letting the programmer focus on algorithms rather than the communication mechanisms provided by the interconnect and the OS. They do not hide the fact that communication takes place, and as such do not attempt to present the cluster as a single parallel machine.

Unlike other process VMs, these systems do not provide a specific programming language, but are embedded in an existing language; typically such a system provides bindings for several languages (e.g., C and FORTRAN). Examples are PVM (Parallel Virtual Machine) and MPI (Message Passing Interface). They are not strictly virtual machines, as the applications running on top still have access to all OS services, and are therefore not confined to the system model provided by the "VM".

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