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What is your opinion towards the revolution in Egypt Non-believers and believers?
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Posted 1/31/11
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_1XBEItYRxw

"Whether you are a Christian, a Muslim, an Agnostic fight for you God damn RIGHTS" like that guy says!

I believes it's beautiful. They are setting an example on what the world should do today. Today's world is asleep without knowing what's really going on in the world. Whether you are an Atheist, Christian, muslim fight for you MOFO RIGHT like that guy says! They found out about the NWO agenda, now they are fighting!

Jesus is LORD!
Jesus Christ Saves

There is only one true god and that's Jehovah God.
Posted 1/31/11 , edited 1/31/11
Standard conflict resulting from a difference of opinion, just like all conflicts.

God, or whoever, by all names he is known, caused all this insanity. All of history's bloodstains are attributed to some hierarchy's nonsense. Jesus, if anything, is pressured by his own father (perhaps just himself according to some) to correct the evils in the world. Egypt will only escalate in its unrest for some time. The fires will burn out, the bodies will be buried, and the smoke will clear. Another chapter written, and the book continues on.
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Posted 2/1/11
Even if you don't believe in god, what is so bad about a guy who lived 2000 years ago and thought it would be nice, if people weren't killing each other frequently? What happens in Egypt is good, even though there may be some stupid politicians who see a new danger coming from the muslim party who is going to take the leadership in the next months. It's not religion that brought war and pain over this world, it's the people. The human race is not made for sharing everything. During the evolution, the human race became selfish to survive. That has not changed until now. And religion also brings good things like welfare groups.
Posted 2/1/11

Dabrush wrote:

Even if you don't believe in god, what is so bad about a guy who lived 2000 years ago and thought it would be nice, if people weren't killing each other frequently? What happens in Egypt is good, even though there may be some stupid politicians who see a new danger coming from the muslim party who is going to take the leadership in the next months. It's not religion that brought war and pain over this world, it's the people. The human race is not made for sharing everything. During the evolution, the human race became selfish to survive. That has not changed until now. And religion also brings good things like welfare groups.
Yeah, right. Your pseudoscience has no real weight in neurophysiology and social-psychology.

And get this, apparently none of his Evangelical followers really grasp the concept you're framing. While at the same time the whole teaching was shaming the human specie with the concept of "Original Sin," that humans committed sin to God just for being born. This went on even after three revising of the covenant. Not to mention is the fact that it created and justified gender stratification and gender roles, without real account from the women's perspective about how they thought and felt about themselves being underrepresented. If anything, the men in the biblical sense are the most biased and selfish individuals I've ever came to known. When they excluded women from leadership, while placing them in a subservient role throughout the biblical history.

Finally, once this movement succeeded, what do yo think will happen with the relationship between Egypt and Israel?
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Posted 2/3/11 , edited 2/3/11
This is quite an interesting subject, but it strikes me as odd that someone would point out whether this thread is meant for believers or non-believers, or both. I thought this is the ED, where everyone's allowed to post, no matter what creed, ethnicity, or citizenship he's part of without the need to point it out in the header of a thread..

Either way, as far as I remember the last revolution Egypt went through was in 1952, trying to get rid of constitutional monarchy, or something along those lines. So it's a big 'Wow' in so many aspects.
A real revolution pandemic affecting quite a few Arabic countries. Very amazing.

Question is, what the Hell does Mubarak still want? This 80 year old geezer is holding to his position as if it was about life and death, but obviously it's a non-issue for him to ask for peace, but then send his police friends into the crowds to get rid of some bullets to make the whole situation bloodier than ever. A president that needs to shoot his own people to keep his power... maybe he should work on some self-reflection as a natural course of things, and take the Tunisian ex-president as a role model, and do likewise (in other words, go for a trip to Saudi Arabia).
This whole revolution is on the verge of a civil war, and it's not getting any better with Mubarak's bone-headed attitude.
I find it very interesting to see that Mubarak has actually so many devoted supporters, as we could see from the clashes between the pro-Mubarak camp and the opposition in the recent days. I read somewhere that there were people walking around, kissing Mubarak's picture, and having big words about how he's their life and everything that pertains to it. Not surprisingly, there were no real intellectuals among the pro-Mubarakers.
The young Egyptians want a new regime, a new 'life', and I think they deserve it more than ever, so the oldies and pro-Mubarak twits should be understanding enough and give way to the desires and wishes of their 'children'. I mean, at some point, even Egypt needs to move forward, and that won't be possible by having some old dude who's there already for ~30 years going on with his misgoverning and so on.
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Posted 2/4/11

Cecilthedarkknight234 wrote:

war, war never changes.

Fallout much .....


nanuq wrote:

This is quite an interesting subject, but it strikes me as odd that someone would point out whether this thread is meant for believers or non-believers, or both. I thought this is the ED, where everyone's allowed to post, no matter what creed, ethnicity, or citizenship he's part of without the need to point it out in the header of a thread..

Either way, as far as I remember the last revolution Egypt went through was in 1952, trying to get rid of constitutional monarchy, or something along those lines. So it's a big 'Wow' in so many aspects.
A real revolution pandemic affecting quite a few Arabic countries. Very amazing.

Question is, what the Hell does Mubarak still want? This 80 year old geezer is holding to his position as if it was about life and death, but obviously it's a non-issue for him to ask for peace, but then send his police friends into the crowds to get rid of some bullets to make the whole situation bloodier than ever. A president that needs to shoot his own people to keep his power... maybe he should work on some self-reflection as a natural course of things, and take the Tunisian ex-president as a role model, and do likewise (in other words, go for a trip to Saudi Arabia).
This whole revolution is on the verge of a civil war, and it's not getting any better with Mubarak's bone-headed attitude.
I find it very interesting to see that Mubarak has actually so many devoted supporters, as we could see from the clashes between the pro-Mubarak camp and the opposition in the recent days. I read somewhere that there were people walking around, kissing Mubarak's picture, and having big words about how he's their life and everything that pertains to it. Not surprisingly, there were no real intellectuals among the pro-Mubarakers.
The young Egyptians want a new regime, a new 'life', and I think they deserve it more than ever, so the oldies and pro-Mubarak twits should be understanding enough and give way to the desires and wishes of their 'children'. I mean, at some point, even Egypt needs to move forward, and that won't be possible by having some old dude who's there already for ~30 years going on with his misgoverning and so on.

Popcornpuffs have in the past been guilty of starting or posting threads with religious overtones, so its to be expected. A pity considering the potential for discussion for this thread.

To be fair Murbarak have done well for his country Egypt especially in the region where cronyism is prevalent, unlike say Saddam, Egypt has prospered, and have a thriving tourism and education industry and is an open partner of the international community.

It is no coincidence that this riot have coincide with the large hike in basic food prices and lack of job. Corruption and the fact that Murbarak have held power for 30 years also have factor in. A repeat of history perhaps, remember dictator Marcos from the Philippines, and people power which toppled him. Riots may have stated as early as the Christmas bombings in Egypt and that during the early stages of the riots, Al-Jazeera reporters were singled out and detained. This riots seem to have imflammed the region, notably Yemen, Jordan, Algeria and even Iraq. People have compared Egypt as the cradle for civilization in that region and there is belief that should Egypt achieve democratic and free and fair election reforms, this will spread to other countries in that region.

A note of concern is the stance of some opposition leaders who may assume leadership position in this vacuum of power, Egypt's Muslim brotherhood have been quoted that they will not support maintaining the peace treaty with Israel. There is conflicting Intelligence reports shows that some of the riots were caused by 'Pro Murbarak' supporters, ( thugs beating up reporters, storming into streets with camels and horses) who have turn violent had been sleeper agents from Iran or Israel who have instigated violence. The most worrying is the video which have surfaced which claimed that an American diplomatic car have ram at full speed at demonstrators.

American diplomatic car ram into Egypt riot - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2q7A-v89hEI&feature=related&skipcontrinter=1

Then there is the issue of whether there should be foreign intervention or aid into Egypt. Some quarters believe that the international community should do more to pressure Murbarak but any intervention even as aid would be perceived as foreign occupation. The riot seems to be on its last legs and even if an interim government is formed, it could be a repeat of the riot in Thailand. The attacks on foreign journalists shows that there is no love lost for for foreigners especially Americans.

Journalist attacked by demonstrators - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xPj0ZCF7tBE

Others: A nation in waiting [Al Jazeera] - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SPtYYJsr7BY
Posted 2/5/11

Northboundsnow wrote:


Popcornpuffs have in the past been guilty of starting or posting threads with religious overtones, so its to be expected. A pity considering the potential for discussion for this thread.

To be fair Murbarak have done well for his country Egypt especially in the region where cronyism is prevalent, unlike say Saddam, Egypt has prospered, and have a thriving tourism and education industry and is an open partner of the international community.

It is no coincidence that this riot have coincide with the large hike in basic food prices and lack of job. Corruption and the fact that Murbarak have held power for 30 years also have factor in. A repeat of history perhaps, remember dictator Marcos from the Philippines, and people power which toppled him. Riots may have stated as early as the Christmas bombings in Egypt and that during the early stages of the riots, Al-Jazeera reporters were singled out and detained. This riots seem to have imflammed the region, notably Yemen, Jordan, Algeria and even Iraq. People have compared Egypt as the cradle for civilization in that region and there is belief that should Egypt achieve democratic and free and fair election reforms, this will spread to other countries in that region.

A note of concern is the stance of some opposition leaders who may assume leadership position in this vacuum of power, Egypt's Muslim brotherhood have been quoted that they will not support maintaining the peace treaty with Israel. There is conflicting Intelligence reports shows that some of the riots were caused by 'Pro Murbarak' supporters, ( thugs beating up reporters, storming into streets with camels and horses) who have turn violent had been sleeper agents from Iran or Israel who have instigated violence. The most worrying is the video which have surfaced which claimed that an American diplomatic car have ram at full speed at demonstrators.

American diplomatic car ram into Egypt riot - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2q7A-v89hEI&feature=related&skipcontrinter=1

Then there is the issue of whether there should be foreign intervention or aid into Egypt. Some quarters believe that the international community should do more to pressure Murbarak but any intervention even as aid would be perceived as foreign occupation. The riot seems to be on its last legs and even if an interim government is formed, it could be a repeat of the riot in Thailand. The attacks on foreign journalists shows that there is no love lost for for foreigners especially Americans.

Journalist attacked by demonstrators - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xPj0ZCF7tBE

Others: A nation in waiting [Al Jazeera] - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SPtYYJsr7BY
Personally, I can't help but to compare this democratic movement with the Chinese democratic movement at Tiananmen Square in 1989. The people's sentiment are still rather high, while the agents of social control had insofar remained relatively neutral. However my worry is the same as yours, and the fact that there aren't strong leadership in the form of intellectuals, suggests to me that this riot was more of a reaction from the working class towards economic hardship. As opposed to a meaningful and formal political reform.
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Posted 2/6/11 , edited 2/6/11

DomFortress wrote:


Northboundsnow wrote:
Personally, I can't help but to compare this democratic movement with the Chinese democratic movement at Tiananmen Square in 1989. The people's sentiment are still rather high, while the agents of social control had insofar remained relatively neutral. However my worry is the same as yours, and the fact that there aren't strong leadership in the form of intellectuals, suggests to me that this riot was more of a reaction from the working class towards economic hardship. As opposed to a meaningful and formal political reform.

I was hoping someone with more background information could response. Both riots are similar in that it occur in public places, the 1989 Tiananmen square (China) riot was near the Forbidden City and the 2011 Tahrir square (Egypt) was near the Omar Makram mosque.. There are differences though. The riot in China which were a succession of protests from April to June 1989 which were led mainly by students and originally started due to death of Zhou Enlai and Hu Yaobang respectively, which later culminated in a call for better political reform and transparency and free rights. The 2011 Egypt riot were generally led by those who were out of jobs and coincide with a large food hike and poor economy as well as influenced by the Tunisian uprising and culminated in a call for removal of a central figure President Murbarak, as well as transparency in elections, Your analysis of the hardship of the working class which resulted in the protests is the same as mine though.

Where the incident in Tiananmen square 1989 ended in tragedy and huge step-back and crackdown on political reforms, it did inspire collapse of several Communist countries across the world. China now is on the world pedestal and there is genuine pride by Chinese and even Asians around the world. Riots or political demonstrations will probably be viewed counter-productive and dissenters figures (Liu Xiabo) as non-relevant or oblivious by the majority of the public. Its more likely that the new generation of intellectual which had been brought up from the rise of China will bring reform to Chinese government from within.

BBC News - June 4, 1989, Tiananmen Square - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XJBnHMpHGRY

The situation in Egypt is still a little unclear, where the Tiananmen square incident resulted in the army firing live rounds to clear the square, the Egyptian army have actually been pretty oblivious to the whole situation even ignoring incidents which occur near them such as foreign journalists being assaulted or protesters parading knifes and throwing stones. As of now, the Egyptian army have gone between both set of protesters and have actually started trying to clear the square of barricades and protesters so its uncertain how this will pan out.

There have been calls for renewed Israel-Palestinian peace talks due to Egypt riot but such talks are doom to fail as both Israel and Palestinians try to see out how this will played out and even if any peace treaty is brokered, will likely be broken should extremist elements seized power in Egypt.

Al-Jazeera - Egypt Army response - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B2VabpLtMHw
Posted 2/7/11 , edited 2/7/11

popcornpuffs wrote:


Katatonia999 wrote:

Standard conflict resulting from a difference of opinion, just like all conflicts.

God, or whoever, by all names he is known, caused all this insanity. All of history's bloodstains are attributed to some hierarchy's nonsense. Jesus, if anything, is pressured by his own father (perhaps just himself according to some) to correct the evils in the world. Egypt will only escalate in its unrest for some time. The fires will burn out, the bodies will be buried, and the smoke will clear. Another chapter written, and the book continues on.


when you don't get Rapture...mmm. I'm not even going to say anythng. Also, pls do your research and pick up the bible.


The Bible isn't research material, since all it expresses are lies. I refuse to worship anything that asexually created itself, such as Jesus Christ. Satan can fuck himself, too. God is just plain vindictive.

As for Egypt, they may as well enslave the Jews and build a new set of pyramids in Giza. Add the old Egyptian mythological faith to the mix and see how things turn out. I guarantee Ra's followers would show infinitely more resolve and courage than any of Yahweh's.

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Posted 2/8/11
If you are serious or at least curious about the situation in Egypt, the best source of news is Al-Jazeera at the moment. Not everyone can access Al-jazeera especially in the US so you may want to try a proxy or listen to CNN. CNN release a short documentary of Egypt as well which is similar to Al-Jazeera but no you-tube links yet. CNN interview with Egyptian foreign minister was disappointing though.

Others: A nation in waiting [Al Jazeera] - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SPtYYJsr7BY

Just a little tidbit for thought, Egypt is US second biggest recipient of military aid after Israel and wikileaks - wikileaks which were released in Nov/Dec 2010 show that the US had been frustrated at the lack of modernization by Egyptian army, as well as the lack of resolve to deal with terrorism in its borders as well as considering Israel as their enemy although having a peace treaty. Quite recently Dick Cheney have gone out in support of Murbarak as a US ally and friend.


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Posted 2/9/11 , edited 2/9/11
I hope Mubarak wins this shit.
For one, there is no uncorrupted government, if those stupid Egyptians trolling around the streets actually wins, some hero would eventually take advantage of the situation, brainwash everyone, and become the leader. And then the whole thing happens again.

Two, since they do not approve the NWO, I think they're thinking of closing the Suez canal, and you know how much
we rely on those out-of-this-world countries to feed our cars. Good luck!

Not because they appear to be the good guys doesn't mean this thing doesn't have negative effects, I bet half of the citizen throwing tantrums like bitchez doesn't even know what they're doing or maybe they just got pissed simply because there's no more internet to wrap their fap sessions.

Funny how some part of the Illuminati agenda and NWO is inspired by those penis monuments their ancestors created! LMFAO.

YOUR ARGUMENT IS INVALID.
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AHTL 
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Posted 2/10/11
THIS IS NOT THE GENERAL DISCUSSION SECTION! THIS IS EXTENDED DISCUSSION SECTION AND WILL BE TREATED AS SUCH.



3. Posts must offer significant content. If you have no opinion on something, DON'T post. "I don't know." or "Yeah I think so too." is not enough. The section is called "extended" for a reason. Longer posts, but more real discussion. This includes the first post by the thread creator. If you don't provide enough information/starting discussion for someone to reply, your thread will be closed


I've cleaned up the posts that broke the simple rules that Extended Discussion has and I expect them to be followed.



I'm in favour of the people. They will not rest until Mubarak is removed from his seat of power, no matter what kind of tricks he tries to throw at the people. All he has done so far is only make the citizen more infuriated. His most recent move was to give all his powers to the Vice President, without removing himself from the president position. The effect of this was as becalming as throwing water on acid. When he was to hold his speech, the majority hoped for his resignation. Instead he took the piss on them and continues to cling to his "throne".

I get the *feeling* that most people think it's the choice between Mubarak and a Muslim government of attitudes that wouldn't do any good. Frankly, I don't think that'll happen (I could be wrong, but still). The majority of Egypt's population is young people around 20 years old, and for once I have faith in that they'll do what is necessary. The way officials and such have been behaving is just plain outrages. Doesn't take much effort to find lots of videos of cars driving into mobs of people and just running over them, among those cars were cars belonging to diplomats.

One video I saw, most vehicles left the area peacefully. And then near the end of the video this ass comes plowing through trying to mow down people and get out. The end result was that the car stopped and was tipped upside down. I have no idea about the fate of the driver, but I doubt it ended well.

As an ending commentary, I'm starting to be more interested in how the aftermath of this revolution will be. How will Egypt fare economically, socially, politically, militarily and so on... From what I've seen, the youths have lost complete faith in the political groups as well.
Posted 2/10/11

AHTL wrote:




I'm in favour of the people. They will not rest until Mubarak is removed from his seat of power, no matter what kind of tricks he tries to throw at the people. All he has done so far is only make the citizen more infuriated. His most recent move was to give all his powers to the Vice President, without removing himself from the president position. The effect of this was as becalming as throwing water on acid. When he was to hold his speech, the majority hoped for his resignation. Instead he took the piss on them and continues to cling to his "throne".

I get the *feeling* that most people think it's the choice between Mubarak and a Muslim government of attitudes that wouldn't do any good. Frankly, I don't think that'll happen (I could be wrong, but still). The majority of Egypt's population is young people around 20 years old, and for once I have faith in that they'll do what is necessary. The way officials and such have been behaving is just plain outrages. Doesn't take much effort to find lots of videos of cars driving into mobs of people and just running over them, among those cars were cars belonging to diplomats.

One video I saw, most vehicles left the area peacefully. And then near the end of the video this ass comes plowing through trying to mow down people and get out. The end result was that the car stopped and was tipped upside down. I have no idea about the fate of the driver, but I doubt it ended well.

As an ending commentary, I'm starting to be more interested in how the aftermath of this revolution will be. How will Egypt fare economically, socially, politically, militarily and so on... From what I've seen, the youths have lost complete faith in the political groups as well.
I can sympathize with their sentiment, when the fact is they're marginalized and underrepresented in a political system that doesn't recognize them. Personally, I would've read this as a form of ignorance and denial from the Egyptian government.
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Posted 2/10/11
Oh my, this is a most cretinous thread, I must say. I think the situation is straightforward. There are multiple factions pursuing their respective aims. If the radical Muslims take over, things will change for the worse. Also, please, please, cut this Illuminati, New World Order and religion shit out. popcornpuffs, you're just spouting rubbish. This isn't a religious question, there are merely religious actors present. The issue itself is one of politics, law and welfare.

On a closing note, I really do hope that they will be able to constitute a legitimate and democratic legislature without the 'co-operation' of the 'faithful'.
Posted 2/11/11 , edited 2/15/11
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