First  Prev  1  2  Next  Last
What is your opinion towards the revolution in Egypt Non-believers and believers?
Posted 2/11/11
Mubarak waives office, the resignation is completed....

Now Egypt will attempt to try and build a democracy of sorts I suppose, but as the country will soon find out,
that is not an easy thing to do...
Ghost Moderator
AHTL 
87723 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
27 / Norway
Online
Posted 2/12/11

NE1469 wrote:

Great. Another holy war. Children taught to destroy anyone with different beliefs often grow up to be fundamentalist extremists. I should wonder if they would decide to carry this upheaval deep into other countries to join with all the other conflicts based on fruity nonsense.


This post reeks so much of ignorance, I don't even know where to start.

Do you even have the faintest idea what this situation is about? Judging from your post, I'd say no.
But hey, if you actually do have a clue what this is about, do share. What does religion have to do with the rebellion the people did against the president's regime? Somehow, that doesn't fit along the lines of religious groups attacking each others. Especially since other than the military trying to keep peace, it was pro-Mubarak and Anti-Mubarak groups clashing. But who is this Mubarak I speak of? Oh right, the president.


Holy War my ass. Kindly read the news before commenting on something you don't know about. In case you're wondering what the hell's my problem is, it's that this is the extended discussion section and not "general chat I just throw in random shit I don't really know about in this thread".

Don't bother defending yourself, it'll only make it worse.



Mubarak threw the towel in, despite his earlier speech, and fled the country. The vice president has taken over along with the military. Hopefully we'll see Egypt back on its feet in no time. Wonder what the most active speakers against Mubarak will do now, will they participate in steering the country, or will they just "fade" back into regular days?

Thinking especially about Mohamed Mustafa ElBaradei, he seems like a rather good guy to have in the world of politics. Seems to have his morals set right, though I don't really know the person, so can't really say for sure. How many youths do you guys think will join the world of politics as well? I wouldn't be surprised if many were inspired, as much as the other way around.
Posted 2/14/11

NE1469 wrote:



Though you argument against my very "ignorant" post is justly made, I do feel offended by being called American and ignorant at the same time. Thus, I will have to report your flaming, and ejaculate inside of your mother's vagina.

Adieu, sir.
Obviously he never encountered something outside of his ethnocentric perspective.
Posted 2/14/11 , edited 2/14/11
Mubarak said he was leaving the country on a 'medical visit', as a way of saving some face. The military has taken a position of acting leadership. We must also be careful that no radical muslims take over and turn Egypt into a theocracy like what happened in Iran. Mubarak did bring stability to the middle east, however he was by no means a charismatic leader. In the end, after thirty plus years of reign, the people were tired of him and many of the social injustices that stemmed as a result of his 'stability'.

Several years back, Obama was in Egypt teaching large groups of college students about the wonders of democracy. This would serve as a sort of catalyst towards a new outlook within the majority of the population which is in the age group of 20-30. This group is arguably the most concerned about the future as they are the youngest modern group to practice self determination, and those who are just now taking on the reponsibility of the previous generations. The protests were a cry for democracy, the one from western culture. Mubarak did not listen to the people and instead tried to dress new curtains by getting rid of his government staff, which would do nothing because he still had ultimate authority.

The police were defeated within the revolution, but quite a few civilians were killed. The tear gas used by police said made in U.S.A. on it and was a cause for upset at the U.S. by many locals holding the revolutions. The people were also upset with the U.S. for not taking a side fast enough. The U.S. was set on taking whichever side was winning in the end. This is mostly because Egypt served as a strategic mobilization hub in the middle east for western forces, and the states had a cozy relationship with the Mubarak regime. After the police were pushed back the military rolled in but were welcomed by the people. The military now had a key decision of either siding with the people, or Mubarak, once push came to shove. There have been no reports of the military actively engaging the demonstrators.

An uprising of pro Mubarak demonstrators raiding the anti Mubarak protests on camels with whips and manage to separate much of the movement. This lead to massive night time battles between the two camps. molotov cocktails were thrown back and forth constantly and the pro Mubarak group set blockades and staged joint rushes against the anti Mubarak forces every once in a while which very effectively pushed the demonstrators back. On several occasions people would be seen completely set aflame by a cocktail while spin doctors on the television were too busy talking about oil implications and how it could hit home, to even notice the screaming fire engulfed man on the edge of the screen.

The primary speculation is where the pro Mubarak movement came from, how it was organized, and what it's overall goals were. My personal opinion is that somebody backed the Pro Mubarak movement. It could have been organized by the police after they put away their uniforms or not but it is up to speculation. This is possible because the police are on a very short leash to Mubarak. Hence why the people hate the police so much while they love the military because the military is almost entirely independent and for the people.

Something else fairly suspicious occurred. Within the same time frame, almost all of the police stations in Cairo were set on fire. Which is something the general public would not be able to stage so effectively. Who could have been behind this and what was their motive?

Also, despite the publics hate for the police, they do not disdain civil authority in general, only oppressive authority. They do not hate the idea of police, but what kind of police they have. The vast majority of the public would not want to burn down police stations, but rather turn the police themselves into a more just force. This was something that was said by a college teacher inside of Cairo during the riots, who particularly had much experience with the youth of her nation and what their current views were.
1288 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
A small place in...
Offline
Posted 2/16/11

varnlestoff wrote:

The police were defeated within the revolution, but quite a few civilians were killed. The tear gas used by police said made in U.S.A. on it and was a cause for upset at the U.S. by many locals holding the revolutions. The people were also upset with the U.S. for not taking a side fast enough. The U.S. was set on taking whichever side was winning in the end. This is mostly because Egypt served as a strategic mobilization hub in the middle east for western forces, and the states had a cozy relationship with the Mubarak regime. After the police were pushed back the military rolled in but were welcomed by the people. The military now had a key decision of either siding with the people, or Mubarak, once push came to shove. There have been no reports of the military actively engaging the demonstrators.

An uprising of pro Mubarak demonstrators raiding the anti Mubarak protests on camels with whips and manage to separate much of the movement. This lead to massive night time battles between the two camps. molotov cocktails were thrown back and forth constantly and the pro Mubarak group set blockades and staged joint rushes against the anti Mubarak forces every once in a while which very effectively pushed the demonstrators back. On several occasions people would be seen completely set aflame by a cocktail while spin doctors on the television were too busy talking about oil implications and how it could hit home, to even notice the screaming fire engulfed man on the edge of the screen.


I am always surprised when people talk that US should have reacted quicker or gotten more involved into the Egypt riot and demonstration. I wonder of the wisdom of direct or immediate US involvement into such an adventure especially in a region where the people still view US suspiciously. I guess the lessons of Iraq or Iran for that matter have already been forgotten. Unless there is sign that there will be genocide or civil war or complete chaos, than US can assist but in the form of UN. No country even in the US wants a foreign country to occupy their soil.

Murbarak, for all his dictatorship, was a close friend of the US and Israel, having maintain the peace treaty with Israel despite numerous attempts on his life and even have a fan of Dick Cheney no less who have come out in support of him.

US is not innocent either, the US despite claiming to promoting freedom and democracy, have in the past and now support dictators, Remember President Marcos of Philipines, US ousting of Mossedeq and placing authoritarian Nadir Shah which led to Iran revolution, currently Yemen and even Saudi Arabian monarchy.




Posted 3/1/11

popcornpuffs wrote:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_1XBEItYRxw

"Whether you are a Christian, a Muslim, an Agnostic fight for you God damn RIGHTS" like that guy says!

I believes it's beautiful. They are setting an example on what the world should do today. Today's world is asleep without knowing what's really going on in the world. Whether you are an Atheist, Christian, muslim fight for you MOFO RIGHT like that guy says! They found out about the NWO agenda, now they are fighting!

Jesus is LORD!
Jesus Christ Saves

There is only one true god and that's Jehovah God.


Aside from religious beliefs, we still have a problem.
we can't remove our government peacefully.
3910 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
26 / M / Pandemonium
Offline
Posted 3/25/11 , edited 3/25/11
Religion in itself is not the root of hatered.
It's the ignorance spread by the ignorant people in charge that breeds hatered.

Besides that, I think all instances of overthrowing a bad regime is good.
Posted 3/25/11

Syndicaidramon wrote:

Religion in itself is not the root of hatered.
It's the ignorance spread by the ignorant people in charge that breeds hatered.

Besides that, I think all instances of overthrowing a bad regime is good.


Agreed.


Warped regimes should either be endured silently or be overthrown at the first best opportunity. I personally prefer the latter.

First  Prev  1  2  Next  Last
You must be logged in to post.