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Can you read a book twice?
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29 / M / Canada
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Posted 4/10/11
Nope (except for manga).
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18 / F / Mother Earth :)
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Posted 4/10/11
well yeah .. some novels ..
Posted 4/10/11
Yes, I read World War Z 3 times now... and Hagakure about 8 when I was in high school.
imphic 
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29 / M / Wisconsin
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Posted 4/10/11
Of course.
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17 / F / A Park somewhere...
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Posted 4/11/11
i re read when ive wanna go bak and look at somthing again or if im bord and the books gud
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20 / F
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Posted 4/11/11
Yea I re-read books sometimes. (But I rarely read books.....should make reading a habit now...it's not too late... I hope
For english assignments, it's sort of a must because there's always some hidden meaning I missed out or something.
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24 / M / UofL; Louisville, KY
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Posted 4/11/11
I can't read a book once.
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21 / M / England
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Posted 4/11/11
I tried, but if I know what's happening in the book I wont even get passed the first page without putting the book down. Read all the harry potter books since I was a kid, I dont read much manga, usually cos I watch the anime's first. Unless the anime is different to the manga, I dont even pick up books nowadays.
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20 / F / Wonderland.
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Posted 4/11/11
Yep! I re-read 'hush, hush' for the third time two days ago. Never will I get bored of that book ♥
October, the third book comes out! Can't wait! ^.^
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17 / F / Downstairs
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Posted 4/11/11
If it were on of my favorites, yeah.
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24 / M / Unknown Planet
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Posted 4/11/11 , edited 4/11/11
of course I dont see why not. a good book is surely worth reading at least twice if you ask me
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23 / That place
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Posted 4/11/11
Is it any good? Then yeah. Twice, thrice. There's this series of books that I've read each and every book up to ten times...
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31 / M / Prattville, AL
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Posted 4/11/11
Neil Gaiman's "Neverwhere"
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Posted 4/11/11
if the book is REALLY REALLY good to me
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28 / M / WI
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Posted 4/11/11
There are some books that you can read over again, and usually for a variety of reasons:

- It's confusing: If the vocabulary utilized in the book is challenging for you, re-reading sections of the book can help you better understand the intent by context. Though this is more often seen while you're reading a book, you can also approach a book you once found difficult (after your vocabulary has been expanded) to see if you can offer a new perspective from your last read.

- It has foreshadowing: If the book is read for pleasure, after knowing the plot, you can re-read a story to figure out what, if any indications were provided that hinted, even subtly, about plot changes. Though this applies mainly to mysteries, with a little imagination, every story plot can be perceived as an unsolved and unravelling puzzle. The challenge here is if you can solve it before the answer has been revealed.

- It's long: With lengthy books, sometimes you don't get very far into a book before you begin to forget details you've only just read recently. Re-reading will allow you to go over parts you were otherwise preoccupied with on a previous read. For example, the story is really engaging, and you become fascinated on one character. You skip around when a new perspective comes in and only skim, in case there are passing references to the character, but otherwise, your mind is not really on what you're reading. After discovering the story of one character, you can follow another character's path through the plot to better take in their perspective, and how it's different from the first. This can blend both foreshadowing and confusion, but it differs slightly in that there must be multiple characters, and you choose to follow and empathize with one protagonist at a time.

- Analysis: If you yourself aspire to write a story, you can always re-read stories you like to find out what about the writing style you admire and can emulate. If you've become fascinated with a particular author's work, you can analyze what exactly you like about it to find similar authors if your available selection seems to dwindle.

- Obscure facts: Reference books, enough said... sometimes you might re-read an entire book to simply refresh your perspective when you last saw a particular passage. When sequels and series refer to a scene or event that happened earlier, you might re-read the corresponding earlier book or section to verify the details of the event.

- Multiple interpretations: Take the Bible as an example: There are plenty of people who are determined that they know exactly what to do, who to talk to, what to say, and how you might be able to walk a desired path in life, all based upon their interpretations of a single book.

- It's intended to be memorized, or simply reading it once doesn't do enough justice to the work. Think of music books here. Performing a piece of written music, in loose sheet or book format, usually requires looking it over multiple times, and playing it multiple times. Each time you play a piece of music, you can interpret or weave in a variety of emotion that you as the performer feels, which changes the tone of the piece altogether. Also books like those Choose-Your-Own-Adventure books... you could never read them once if you got into it... when you go through the book there's usually multiple spots where you really want to find out what happens when you 'choose the other action' than the one you originally go with... early version RPG games anyone?

- It's a story you enjoyed, but have since forgotten the details about... and still have the book available, so you re-read the book to experience the story once again. Usually in this case, getting into the story itself accelerates the amount you can remember, usually resulting in skimming lightly to refresh it in your mind once more.
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