Post Reply mite vs goran
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26 / F / neko kingdom^^
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Posted 4/9/11
yoku mite goran....
goran kudasai....
mite kudasai....
yoku mite kudasai....

in general, what's the different between mite and goran?
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Posted 4/14/11
goran kudasai....
mite kudasai....
please look . Same meaning but goran = honorifics

yoku mite kudasai please take a good look at it.


mite goran = please look at it (but you don't know what to expect)
it's hard to explain, but for example you saw something on the table or something, before you take a look at it, you ask someone else to look at it, but you have no idea what it is.
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Posted 8/1/11

aineko wrote:

yoku mite goran....
goran kudasai....
mite kudasai....
yoku mite kudasai....

in general, what's the different between mite and goran?


Mite and goran are different not just in terms of mode of speech (normal versus honorific), but also in terms of conjugation. "Mite" is the re-form of "miru", and simply means "to see". "Goran" comes from "goran ni naru", which is the honorific form of the same thing "to see".

Where you use these verbs is the difference. "Miru" is used for all generic encounters, but "goran ni naru" is an honorific and used ONLY for the actions of someone higher than you. Please do not make the mistake of using "goran" in reference to your own actions.

"mite goran", the combination of the two, is a shortened form of "mite goran nasai". This is just a formal way of asking someone else (usually of a higher standing) to look at something. Adding "yoku" is a polite way of asking them to look more carefully (perhaps because there are details that you'd like them to notice, or they didn't notice something previously). This is very common in the speech of store clerks.

"Goran kudasai" is another shortened form of the longer "goran ni natte kudasai", and simply asks for the same thing - for someone (higher than you) to look at something. This has a more generic sound to it and might not be as specific as the first sentence you gave. I could use this, for example, in reference to a television show or a stage performance.

"mite kudasai" uses "miru" instead of "goran ni naru", so it's usage can be for anyone - usually someone of equal standing or someone under you (a junior or inferior). It means the same thing - please take a look at... Adding "yoku" does the same thing as it did with the first example you gave.


In summary, these are social nuances, and it depends on who you're talking to. If you're talking to a superior or senior, we use the honorific forms (goran ni naru). For everything else, miru is fine. Again, don't make the mistake of using goran ni naru for your own actions. That is just wrong, and you'll sound nothing short of a snob.
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Posted 8/14/11
o-ho..... i see now.....
just like ake-ome,koto-yoro.......
sankyu
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