Here, play a game of Quantum Tic-Tac-Toe
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Posted 5/20/11 , edited 5/20/11
http://www.paradigmpuzzles.com/QT3Play.htm

The rules are (not) simple.

Like regular tic-tac-toe, it is played on a 3x3 board between two players - an X and an O.

Unlike regular tic-tac-toe, each player places two Xs or Os on their turn, marking it with the turn number that the marker was placed on. However, these are only "quantum" moves and thus represent possible moves in a normal game of tic-tac-toe. In the end, only one of these markers will become "real". Because these moves are only possibilities and not final moves, the opposing player can decide to also place his markers in one or both of the same spots! If both players decide to place a marker on the same location, that location has a mixed state and becomes "entangled".

An "entangled" location influences what happens in other locations, because in the end, each turn must have exactly one of the two markers remaining. For example, presume you have a tic-tac-toe board with the locations numbered like this:
123
456
789

If X's first move places a marker on #1 and #5 and O's first move places a marker on #5 and #3, location #5 becomes entangled. Thus location #1 points to location #5 and location #5 points to location #3, with location #5 being entangled.

If in the future, someone places a marker at location #3 and #1 on the same turn, then location #3 will point to location #1. All three of these locations are entangled with each other and a "collapse" occurs. During a collapse, one of the markers in the circularly entangled locations is chosen. Depending upon the marker which is selected, each of the entangled locations 'selects' a marker such that each turn has exactly one marker remaining.

For example:
Turn 1: X places a marker on location #1 and #5
Turn 2: O places a marker on location #5 and #3, location #5 becomes entangled
Turn 3: X places a marker on location #2 and #6
Turn 4: O places a marker on location #6 and #9, location #6 becomes entangled
Turn 5: X places a marker on location #3 and #1, locations #1 and #3 both become entangled
!! locations #1, #3 and #5 are circularly entangled, so a collapse must occur !!

Thus the board looks like this:
x1x5|x3??|o2x5
---------------------
????|x1o2|x3o4
---------------------
????|????|o4??

Thus location #1 collapses to x1 IF AND ONLY IF location #5 also collapses to o2 AND location #3 collapses to x5
Also, location #1 collapses to x5 IF AND ONLY IF location #5 also collapses to x1 AND location #3 collapses to o2

location #6 is still entangled and does not participate in the collapse because it is not circularly entangled with the rest of the entangled locations.

Thus we have two possible futures. You will notice that no matter which future is chosen, location #1 will ALWAYS collapse to an x value. Once a location is "collapsed", it can no longer be used.

The game continues until all locations have collapsed. Interestingly enough, a collapse can cause multiple victory conditions to occur at the same time, causing both players to win with the same collapse, or one player to win multiple times.

It's an interesting game, which helped me wrap my mind around quantum physics without the need to understand complicated and advanced mathematics which I won't learn for another year or two, if at all.
Posted 5/20/11
TL;DR

You except anyone get this pretentious game down? Why, if quantum physics runs the rules, then the entire game itself is utter chaos.
Posted 5/20/11

Sonovabitch wrote:

TL;DR

You except anyone get this pretentious game down? Why, if quantum physics runs the rules, then the entire game itself is utter chaos.
But chaos is a state of order in process, it's change in the making. And this is a game theory that demonstrates even chaos itself can result from rules.
Posted 5/20/11

DomFortress wrote:


Sonovabitch wrote:

TL;DR

You except anyone get this pretentious game down? Why, if quantum physics runs the rules, then the entire game itself is utter chaos.
But chaos is a state of order in process, it's change in the making. And this is a game theory that demonstrates even chaos itself can result from rules.


Hmmm. Can't we just play Risk with more nonsensical rules?
Posted 5/20/11

Sonovabitch wrote:


DomFortress wrote:


Sonovabitch wrote:

TL;DR

You except anyone get this pretentious game down? Why, if quantum physics runs the rules, then the entire game itself is utter chaos.
But chaos is a state of order in process, it's change in the making. And this is a game theory that demonstrates even chaos itself can result from rules.


Hmmm. Can't we just play Risk with more nonsensical rules?
But the sequence in Risk isn't a result from rules, instead it's based on the rolling of dices. That's just randomness within a pattern of probability over time, not chaos resulting from predetermine rules.
Posted 6/4/11
I read a story that said some scientists, I forget where I apologize, managed to defy one of the laws of quantum mechanics
Thought it might be relevant to this game

The rule stated that you cannot observe light acting as both a particle and a wave at the same time (wave-particle duality, Schroedinger's observation ideas and such) but these scientists managed to do it, although with quite a hazy method and I'm not entirely sure they really defied the rule

Also, the plural of dice is dice, the singular is die, just thought I'd mention that too
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Posted 6/4/11
I did this
o2x7 | x1x9 | x1o6
o4x5 | o2o8 | x3o6
o4x7 | x5x9 | x3o8

and it went green.
Posted 6/22/11
....i'll just stick to regular tic-tac-toe.
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Posted 6/22/11

Rozzl-Dozzl wrote:

....i'll just stick to regular tic-tac-toe.


agreed
o_o
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