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Do Asians In Asia Hate Asian-Americans
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Posted 7/27/11

blueberryspell wrote:

laughing is healthy BRO???....


Yeah, according to some articles, it is.
Posted 7/27/11
I'm thinking they view them as disgraceful.
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19 / F / New York
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Posted 7/27/11
Most asian american's parents originate from asia, and they went to the US to have their kids to try to make sure that their kid's life would be better than their own, so I see no reason for malice. I do however sympathize with the part about asian americans losing cultural and traditional values. well, last time I went to china the kids seemed to love me.
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Posted 7/27/11 , edited 7/27/11

Sid-Lee wrote:

I’ve never felt welcome in Japan. I remember going there as a child and hoping they’d accept me but finding out rather quickly that they did not. The surprise turned out to be the disdain they felt toward me – as though I were somehow less than them. Surprisingly, many of the non-Japanese tourists were actually treated better than me!

Is it a language thing? Is it because Asians think Asian Americans somehow sold out (our people, history, culture)?

In response to the former, even if we are proficient at our ancestor’s language, it could never be on par with those who still live there. Personally, I had a speech impediment as a child and was not allowed to learn Japanese until I learned English! The last time I was in Japan, a person shook her head at me and said that my Japanese was “bad” and “what a shame it was.” She never bothered to ask why I couldn’t speak.


I'm Japanese-American and from Los Angeles(?) too. ^^ I definitely think it has to do with language. Since JAs look Japanese, it might seem weird to people in Japan that they can't speak Japanese. For a gaijin, it's like: oh, (s)he's definitely white so it's okay...

Japanese was my first language, and I try to maintain my Japanese as best as I can, but it's difficult because I live in the U.S. Although I wouldn't say that Asians "hate" Asian-Americans... they're not very understanding.

You should read "Being Japanese American" by Gil Asakawa. Good book, title explains what it's about.

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Posted 7/27/11

KleinerSkollexxx wrote:


underlock wrote:

I think a lot of people hate a lot of stuff and underlock doesn't give a shit.


A lot of Americans hate foreigners too, big deal..




Hating foreigners and hating someone of the same ethnicity is different.
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Posted 7/27/11


I'm talking about foreigners in this case, not really attacking any race in whole.
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30 / F / Japan
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Posted 7/27/11
well i can honestly say that they have a harder time in Asia. Like for example, Ive lived in Japan for 10 years and my husband is half japanese and half american. on the military base, there are JN workers which stands for japanese nationals. Even though my husband has dual citizenship, the japanese told him that to work on the american military base as a JN he would have to give up his american citizenship. They do not like the fact that half american half japanese get the full benefits of a JN on the military base. That says a lot. Even off base in Japan, it is very difficult for them as a whole. but then again, you can see things like that everywhere you go. Its not just for Amerasian people...its for a lot of people throughout the world
Posted 7/28/11
Sounds like simple racism. Nothing new, he lives in America etcetera etcetera they don't like that, so they're going to hate him for it. It's nothing out of the ordinary, really.

I can't really specify WHY people throw things like that. You can't really abandon your culture or race, you just adopt new ones. It isn't rational, and I wouldn't put that much feeling into it if I were you, Sid-Lee. It just sounds like people calling him out for mundane things, and making him out as unreasonable in some form or another.
Posted 7/28/11
hmmm I didn't realize there would be such strong animosity towards an expat (for want of a better word) as a tourist or in a high government position. I'm half Iranian half Indian, born in Iran and living in Australia. So I am familiar with feeling like I don't belong. That is I'm an Iranian in Australia and an Australian in Iran.

However whenever I travel back home to Iran I've never encountered anyone who begrudged or looked down on the fact that I'm no longer Iranian.To be fair I did live in Iran till I was 8 so I have close family ties and friends. I do also think its partly a cultural reaction. The big thing about Iranians is hospitality (A practice that I've found is also very significant with Indians, other middle eastern cultures as well as Asians especially with East Asian). Guests are to be treated as kings and we tend to try to go out of our way to make them feel comfortable and therefore not insulted or offended. Also generally instead of feeling spiteful towards an American-Iranian, Australian- Iranian etc. who has 'deserted' their motherland we often feel proud of the fact that we are spread out all over the world and representing our country and culture hopefully in a better light than what is depicted on T.V./the news. We enjoy finding out if someone famous might have a bit of Iranian blood in them. For instance most Iranians loved (and may still love) Andre Agassi who is half Iranian on his dad side and this is despite Agassi himself feeling affiliated or not.

Now Indians are a great example of a people who maintain their culture no matter where they are and how many generations they are down the line. That means language, customs, food, dress sense. I know 5th and 6th generations South African Indians and Fiji Indians who are (for want of a better word) typical Indians. That is not to say that they haven't integrated but that they have retained what they deem ethnically and culturally significant to them. There are just so many Indian working/living outside of India and its been such a common practice through their history that its not a big deal to them. Furthermore, India is just a big melting pot of different cultures. Each state literally has its own language hence dialect and accent, cuisine, customs and even ways to wear a sari. Generally there's has always been a country of acceptance.

I did mention at the top that I do get senses of not belonging but its generally not a result of being unaccepted. For instance in Australia its probably born out of being a minority and some of the cultural discrepancies that come with it. There is of course the occasional discriminatory remark that I've had to deal with. Whereas when travelling in Iran or India that sense of not belonging has more to do with the differing social norms/ques rather than the antagonism of the people, which I have never experienced. For instance I can't get used to always having to wear a scarf and trench coat whenever I go out in public in Iran just because I'm a women or the fact that their public transport is segregated for men and women . Its bloody made mandatory by the government and bloody stupid. Just to make it clear though no women wear a burka in Iran, Most women will begrudgingly wear stylish hermes like scarf just to cover their hair (partially even) not the face and a stylish coat. Some older women may still wear a chador which is more of a huge wrap around cloak that still leaves the face bear. What I can't get used to in India is their attitude towards time, nothing is ever done on time especially when you want to get somewhere but everyone else is not bothered by it one bit.

Anyway to get back on topic and I am sorry for making an essay of it but I do find it sad that this kinda racial stereotyping does occur. It does hurt when you feel unaccepted by your own people. Just because you may have lived the majority of your life overseas/been born overseas/are biracial and don't have a fluent grasp of the language, doesn't mean you don't have an understanding and appreciation for your heritage and the history and culture of your originating country.
It makes you wonder if they question why you are making a trip to visit in the first place.
Posted 7/28/11
EH?! That's kind of sad if all Asians in Asia did..... I am sure only some though.....maybe.....IDK.
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Posted 7/28/11
what.the.hell. i'm asian living in asia and i think asian-americans are ok, as long as they're decent. maybe some asians are just jelly or something.
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Posted 7/28/11
I believe they do because you can read it/listen to it on YouTube...the fact of the matter is that people dislike America in general it's no secret
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24 / in darkness where...
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Posted 7/28/11 , edited 7/28/11
nah I don't hate them... i don't even know that person so why would i judge and hate? here in my country we don't see you like that maybe because its somehow common in our country to have half american half filipino...well, they'll criticize you if your popular though....oh yeah if ur half we see you as pretty than us (commonly that's what i observed at people)

many people are racist because of culture and lack of knowledge in understanding a person... -_-

Posted 7/28/11
I have cousins in America. What difference does it make? I have cousins in South Africa. *Shrugs*
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Posted 7/28/11

KleinerSkollexxx

I'm talking about foreigners in this case, not really attacking any race in whole.



Then you're missing a huge part of the discussion question...

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