Anime and Science
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42 / M / Toronto, Canada
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Posted 8/31/11
According to Wikipedia, the creators of the Gundam series tried to be consistent with science in their science fiction. According to Wikipedia, "Unlike its super robot cousins, Gundam attempted a realism in the robot design and weaponry, by running out of energy and ammunition or breaking and malfunctioning. The technology is practical and is either derived from true science (such as Lagrange points in space and the O'Neill cylinder as a living environment) or at least well-explained, feasible technology, requiring only a few fictional elements to function (such as Minovsky Physics as a means of energy production from helium-3)." Which anime follows science in science fiction best?

Alternately, books like Orwell's 1984 , Yevgany Zamyatin's We and Brave New World by Aldous Huxley deal with futuristic societal dystopias. The "No 6" series on Crunch Rolls also deals with dystopias in future societies. Anyone care to draw parallel's between anime and dystopias?

I realize these are different topics, but am not sure how many CR users appreciate connections between good science and good science fiction and anime.

I. Khider
The Wise Wizard
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Posted 8/31/11
It has been just over 4 years since I watched it, but as I recall, Starship Operators is one I would nominate for the "realistic science" award.
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25 / M / BC, Canada =P
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Posted 8/31/11

ikhider wrote:

According to Wikipedia, the creators of the Gundam series tried to be consistent with science in their science fiction. According to Wikipedia, "Unlike its super robot cousins, Gundam attempted a realism in the robot design and weaponry, by running out of energy and ammunition or breaking and malfunctioning. The technology is practical and is either derived from true science (such as Lagrange points in space and the O'Neill cylinder as a living environment) or at least well-explained, feasible technology, requiring only a few fictional elements to function (such as Minovsky Physics as a means of energy production from helium-3)." Which anime follows science in science fiction best?


I'm sorry, but GUNDAMUU has consistently been failing to do this with every new mainstream series.
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42 / M / Toronto, Canada
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Posted 8/31/11 , edited 8/31/11
I will check that out, never heard of Starship Operators before. Thanks. I think sci-fi helps our society dream up new uses for technology. The guy who invented the CD claims he got the idea from watching a Star Trek TOS episode.

As for Gundam mainstream not following science, that is a good point. As another great sci-fi writer, Stanislav Lem (who write Solaris and the brilliant His Masters Voice) mentioned, and I paraphrase here, a lot of sci-fi is more fantasy than actual science fiction. I think anime creators should be encouraged to embrace science more. I really enjoyed the original Gundam series which really seems to try to follow science where possible.

That is why I love a lot of anime, it helps us dream up possible worlds.
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Posted 8/31/11 , edited 8/31/11

ikhider wrote:

I will check that out, never heard of Starship Operators before. Thanks. I think sci-fi helps our society dream up new uses for technology. The guy who invented the CD claims he got the idea from watching a Star Trek TOS episode.

As for Gundam mainstream not following science, that is a good point. As another great sci-fi writer, Stanislav Lem (who write Solaris and the brilliant His Masters Voice) mentioned, and I paraphrase here, a lot of sci-fi is more fantasy than actual science fiction. I think anime creators should be encouraged to embrace science more. I really enjoyed the original Gundam series which really seems to try to follow science where possible.

That is why I love a lot of anime, it helps us dream up possible worlds.


The French and Russians were always making good science-fiction back in the day. Did you see the remake of Solaris with Clooney? I respect Clooney as an actor and the movie was fairly decent. I'm also a big proponent of sci-fi and I continually wish for there to be new and original smart science-fiction works in books, films and TV series (including anime). Though it's obvious that it doesn't sell enough for studios and publishers to make it a priority.
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Posted 9/2/11
Planetes. It is an anime about a group of astronauts that recover so of the numerous pieces of debris that orbit the Earth and can damage or destroy space vehicles and satellites.
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Posted 9/2/11 , edited 9/2/11
I applaud Fullmetal Alchemist for making some good attempts at real chemistry. Like when Edward decides to decompose dynamite and create ammonia from it (utilizing the nitrogen).

Though sometimes it fails, like in
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Posted 9/2/11

imphic wrote:

Planetes. It is an anime about a group of astronauts that recover so of the numerous pieces of debris that orbit the Earth and can damage or destroy space vehicles and satellites.
Yup, Planetes as far as space science fiction ~ as noted above, Gundam has strayed farther and farther from "hard sci fi" as its gone along.

Ghost in the Shell: Stand Along Complex is more cyberpunk, but its got some realistic science and plausible "speculative science" in it.

Last Exile, which was on CR for a while, is a classic "what if the colonial starship crew does not want to hand the reigns over to the colonists when they get to the colony world" tale.

Scrapped Princess is a series that starts out looking like a fantasy, but is revealed to be a science fiction. There is a plot point in it, however, which is a big enough hand wave that it does not stand up with Planetes or GitS:SAC.

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42 / M / Toronto, Canada
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Posted 9/5/11
@kufirst "I'm also a big proponent of sci-fi and I continually wish for there to be new and original smart science-fiction works in books, films and TV series (including anime). Though it's obvious that it doesn't sell enough for studios and publishers to make it a priority."

Agreed. There are talented writers out there, not all of them use science and instead rely more heavily on fantasy. While fantasy is important, I think we ought to show more appreciation for those who try to incorporate actual science in her/his fiction. Mind you science from a hundred years ago is different from science now. Back then, what we have now could be considered pure fantasy.

One of my favored Anime is Macross/Southern Cross/Mospeada, and they did a lot of science boo boos. On the other hand, I liked when Akira incorporated some degree of science. The problem with science in Akira and Ghost in the Shell is the characters did a lot of talking to explain the science behind the story, whereas they should have shown more science. MacGuyver, though a cheesy show, showed some science. So an anime that shows and not just tells would be great.

Others here have posted "Planetes" as a good show, I should check that out too. : - )
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Posted 9/5/11
I think in Gundam 00, the concept behind Fossil fuel vs solar power and the ability of harnessing 100% power of solar power is a great incorporation of science in the story.

And I really wish eventually that is the reality and That we all stop depending on fossil fuel or nuclear power and use the power of the sun before it is really too late for our planet.



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Posted 9/5/11
I think Steins Gate, I actually had to look up the theories in order to understand the series

About 99% of what happens it can be explained through science and interpretation.
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