First  Prev  1  2  Next  Last
anime company subtitles
1487 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
32 / F
Offline
Posted 9/14/11
Funimation has started doing it and that makes me happeh.

After watching Durarara on DVD, I confirm that Aniplex's subtitles REALLY SUCK. Not only are their translations horribly vague, but they sub the first name of the character when the audio is saying the LAST NAME INSTEAD.

DO YOU HAVE ANY IDEA HOW F**KING CONFUSING AND DISTRACTING THAT IS!?
36067 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
29 / M
Offline
Posted 9/14/11

Chiibihime wrote:

Funimation has started doing it and that makes me happeh.

After watching Durarara on DVD, I confirm that Aniplex's subtitles REALLY SUCK. Not only are their translations horribly vague, but they sub the first name of the character when the audio is saying the LAST NAME INSTEAD.

DO YOU HAVE ANY IDEA HOW F**KING CONFUSING AND DISTRACTING THAT IS!?


Agreed, but that is only because we have some sense of what is going on. If someone who did not understand anime comes in they will not be as aware of what the characters are saying and it might confuse them if the name was backwards. Maybe they are trying for a broader audience than just anime fans.
6308 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
29 / M / Virginia, USA
Offline
Posted 9/14/11

Cecilthedarkknight234 wrote:

in all honesty there really isn't a need. If you can hear it then it's fine in my case it's just much eaiser to do for subbers to do and it's been that way for years now. Fan-subbers are the ones that started to use the sama, chan etc if i remember correctly..


Onee-sama----->Sissy

That's why I prefer when they add the honorifics. I appreciate the fluidity of the translation more than the unfamiliar endings to new sub watchers. Fansubbers should always keep honorifics because it just makes more sense. Once you watch enough subbed anime, you begin to understand it anyway. Words that are literal or have an implyed meaning should be translated as such but words that don't have any actual English derivatives should stay untranslated.


136480 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
M / USA
Offline
Posted 9/14/11 , edited 9/14/11
It'd be pretty unnecessary if they did tack it on because it's something that is required in Japanese that isn't required in the English language (dubs or subs). Now, with some fansubs I have seen the addition of dattebayo, de gozaimasu or de arimasu because they can't be directly translated into English and therefore they add it to the text.

As mentioned I don't feel the need for both in my text when watching anime.
66778 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
31 / M / Lagrange, KY
Offline
Posted 9/14/11


little mad eh?? well most people get the jist of what's going on and we live in a digital age now. If people hear a work and are to lazy to look it up that's their problem, there is no reason for stupidity in this day and age. ahem rant aside they just don't do it. That's like translating desu or nano or nipha~ to me on the end of a sentence they don't mean anything... really.
11243 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
25 / M / BC, Canada =P
Offline
Posted 9/14/11
Here's my solution to all your problems TC .

Either learn Japanese and watch raws, or suck it up like a man.
62497 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
50 / M / Champaign, IL
Offline
Posted 9/14/11

PhoenixBlaze wrote:


uhohimdead wrote:

well there are no japanese honorifics in english now are there... i suppose they assume the viewers don't understand what japanese honorifics look like or what they mean


There is Mr./Mrs./Ms.,Dr.,Madam, Your Highness, Your Excellency, Master [Insert name], possibly others I don't know about.

But those don't really translate the same way. In some cases there are fine gradations of respect that are lost without the use of honorifics. For instance, at the beginning of Ah! My Goddess, Belldandy refers to Keiichi as "Keiichi Morisato-sama". He is uncomfortable being called that, and she settles on Keiichi-san, which is not awkward at all. In the dub, she starts out calling him Mr. Keiichi Morisato and when he protests she shortens it to Mr. Keiichi, which is still awkward. (It has been too long since I have seen it with subtitles, so I don't know how they did it there...) It would be better to just leave the honorifics intact to keep the intent of the levels of respect shown intact. Many of the other characters call him just Keiichi or Keiichi-kun, which shows differing levels of relationships and have no equivalent in English either.
An example that I think is handled well is with Keiichi's sister, who calls him Kei-chan in Japanese, which would be a child-like nickname from when they were kids. In the English dub, she just calls him Kei, which imparts a similar level of familiarity. It's kind of like a sister calling a guy named Bill by Billy.

In an American story, those type of relationship subtleties would have to be shown in some other way most of the time. The honorifics certainly make things easier!

47540 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
33 / M
Offline
Posted 9/14/11
I say it also depends on the anime series and company like Sental Filmworks for Kamfer kepts the honorifics and sempai and such yet for Poyphonica just used the guys name for Sempai and mr and mrs for the san if it really implied to someone they didnt know well. However if you watch Bleach they call the character by last name most of the time with the japanese and sub it and dub in the first name. Which was kinda stupid if you ask me since a lot of it is watched by the same audience that would watch family guy and they call Glen Quagmire by his last name all of the time so you cant honestly say that "Oh were not used to hearing the last name only being called".
First  Prev  1  2  Next  Last
You must be logged in to post.