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Posted 11/7/11

haikinka wrote:

Talking from personal experience, I'v never read/heard "が" used in the way you are explaining. Obviously it could just be me being iknowledgeable(is that a word o.0).


I find that odd. が is so often used in this context, that I usually slap it on at the end of most of my sentences just to sound polite. If it helps, you're probably aware that が is a subject marker. Sticking it at the end of a sentence makes it an abridged (incomplete) sentence, which you can use for polite questions:


京都駅に行きたいんです。> "(it is that) I wish to go to Kyoto Station."


京都駅に行きたいんですが。 > "(It is that) I wish to go to Kyoto Station (may you show me how?)


Adding the が at the end in the second example added a contextual "how do you get there?" component. But it doesn't always have to be used for contextual questions. Since it functions as an abridged (omitted) predicate (2nd part of your sentence), you can use it for any case in which you feel you're being too direct:


ここに来ちゃったんですが… > "And so (person/thing) arrived here..."


This sentence indicates that someone, probably yourself, someone else, or something arrived, but the が at the end shows you may or may not have certain reservations to the said statement. Or, depending on context, you're expecting someone to comment on what you just said. Or, it's just a matter of habit.

That's why I can't see why you've never heard が being used in such a way. In fact, I think it's a bit off for me to have mentioned its usage as such in the previous post because the が in the letter was used in its conjunctive form (as the word "but"), so it's actually an entirely different thing! I only mentioned it because it has a similar function when you think about how it relates to 気になる as a personal emotion, and how the person could have been showing reservations and adding politeness in his speech.



Also, your examples seem to not make much sense? , I think there are a few mistakes grammatically(if that's what you call it). Especially the last one, which i could make almost no sense of at all.


I checked the last one and I added an extra は particle where I shouldn't have. Otherwise, the sentence appears to make sense to me.

If I may comment, though, you gave the example 気になりますでしょう, which I may or may not have clarified that you need to state as 気になるでしょう if you want it to be grammatically correct. Remember that the root word is 気になる, which is actually what we refer to as a "state change verb", because it contains the helping verb なる, which indicates a change. When you conjugate it to the simple polite form, it becomes 気になります, but don't forget that this type of conjugation comes at the end of a sentence. Whenever you add other polite markers (like でしょう, which is actually what we call the "uncertainty particle"), you need to revert the word 気になります back to its original form > 気になる, which brings us to 気になるでしょう.

Sorry, I hope I'm not coming off as defense or aloof in pointing these things out. I tend to use technical grammatical terms, but I don't mean to bombard you with them just to prove a point. If there's anything you don't understand, just say so and I'll try to explain it in simpler terms. I just hope that my explanations now are somewhat simpler...
Posted 11/8/11 , edited 11/8/11


Haha nevermind, now that you say it like that i have heard it a lot XD My bad!

And no need to apologize, it's my fault for being stupid and not knowing the terminology! But i appreciate the simplified one :P

78167 cr points
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30 / M / Japan
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Posted 11/8/11

haikinka wrote:

Haha nevermind, now that you say it like that i have heard it a lot XD My bad!

And no need to apologize, it's my fault for being stupid and not knowing the terminology! But i appreciate the simplified one :P



I highly doubt that.
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