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The Ultimate Truth
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20 / M / Stoke, England
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Posted 12/8/11 , edited 12/8/11
2 + 2 = 4; It does not equal anything else. The truth is, there is only one truth. Believing 2 + 2 = 5 or 6 or anything else does not make it true. There are an infinite amount of wrong answers, but only one true answer.

Only the truth can stop the wars and make the world the paradise it can be.

Common denominator: The truth is the only thing that can unite all human beings. It is what we all have in common, and that will never change. There is only one sky for all of us. Everyone eats and breathes and is born and dies etc. The ultimate truth is universal truth; it is the same for everyone, everywhere. It always has been and always will be. We can now know the truth about life and death.

"Truth is what stands the test of experience. A man should look for what is and not for what he thinks should be". - Albert Einstein

Reason: We can now use our ability to reason, deductive logic, and extrapolation of the known evidence to know and understand things the evidence does not reveal directly, such as life after death. We have progressed enough to know and understand the fundamental truth of life. It will transform us and our world.

These first pages will explain the truth: http://www.truthcontest.com/entries/the-present-universal-truth/ultimate-truth.html



Edit: I'm very bad at explaining things, but here is a brief summary of a certain aspect of it:

We all live by our minds. Using your mind can essentially mean being aware of things, communicating with living things including other people, and logical thinking, such as problem-solving in maths. Everyone above the age of, say, 2 or 3 years old at least partially thinks like this. We fully think like this at the age of about 11 - 13. It could also mean having emotions, but I'm not so sure because emotions are natural, and you kinda have them without using your mind aswell.

Anyways, that's what humans live like. Animals live by their lives. Instead of expanding their mind to be logical, they expand their lives - they have no thought process whatsoever, yet they are extremely happy. When animals are being tortured or appear scared, they're actually in bliss, almost as if they're tripping balls or something and they're high as fuck. Their actions are just natural so their body reacts in a way to try and get out of the situation, but they do not feel pain or pleasure. Children under the ages of 2 or 3 years are almost exactly like this. Just like the book which I linked says: "Remember how long summer used to last?" They don't think about what they do, they just pretty much roam around (apart from when they're sleeping) and use their senses. The only thing they know is what they see, hear, smell, taste, and touch. So this is why when you are younger, time moves much slower:

You are experiencing and can remember every single second you have existed..

Unfortunately, human brains are too large so we eventually grow up and become intelligent. Oh well, now we know how to get world peace - LOBOTOMIZE EVERYONE

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Posted 12/8/11
*blank face*... Very interesting... O.O
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Posted 12/8/11
A Proposed Definition of Truth

In defining truth, it is first helpful to note what truth is not:

• Truth is not simply whatever works. This is the philosophy of pragmatism – an ends vs. means type approach. In reality, lies can appear to “work,” but they are still lies and not the truth.
• Truth is not simply what is coherent or understandable. A group of people can get together and form a conspiracy based on a set of falsehoods where they all agree to tell the same false story, but it does not make their presentation true.
• Truth is not what makes people feel good. Unfortunately, bad news can be true.
• Truth is not what the majority says is true. Fifty-one percent of a group can reach a wrong or false conclusion.
• Truth is not what is comprehensive. A very detailed and long presentation can still result in a false conclusion.
• Truth is not defined by what is intended. A good intention can still be wrong.
• Truth is not how we know; truth is what we know.
• Truth is not simply what is believed. A lie believed is still a lie.
• Truth is not what is publicly proved. A truth can be privately known (e.g. buried treasure).

With an understanding of what truth is not, it is now easier to move to what truth actually is. The Greek word for truth is alētheia, which literally means to “un-hide” or “hiding nothing.” It conveys the thought that truth is always there, always open and available for all to see, with nothing being hidden or obscured (i.e. no deception is involved). The Hebrew word for truth is emeth, which means to have a “firmness,” “constancy” and “duration.” Such a definition implies an everlasting substance and something that can be relied upon.

From a philosophical perspective, there are three simple ways to define truth:

1. Truth is that which corresponds to reality.
2. Truth is that which matches its object.
3. Truth is simply telling it like it is.

First, truth corresponds to reality or “what is.” It is the “really real.” Truth is also correspondent in nature. In other words, it matches its object and is known by its referent. For example, a teacher facing a class may say, “Now the only exit to this room is on the right.” For the class that may be facing the teacher, the exit door may be on their left, but it’s absolutely true that the door, for the professor, is on the right.

Truth also matches its object. It may be absolutely true that a certain person may need so many milligrams of a certain medication, but another person may need more or less of the same medication to produce the desired effect. This is not relative truth, but just an example of how truth must match its object. It would be wrong (and potentially dangerous) for a patient to request that their doctor give them an inappropriate amount of a particular medication, or for that manner to say that any medicine for their specific ailment will do.

In short, truth is simply telling it like it is; it is the way things really are, and any other viewpoint is wrong. In fact, in philosophy, one of the most foundational principles is being able to make judgments between truth and error, or as Thomas Aquinas observed: "It is the task of the philosopher to make distinctions."
Posted 12/8/11
Well-explanatory.
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20 / M / Stoke, England
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Posted 12/8/11


Philosophy isn't the truth though. That's why it's philosophy.
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Posted 12/8/11

CarboKill wrote:



Philosophy isn't the truth though. That's why it's philosophy.


Then you are short sighted, good sir. And I bid you adeu.
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Posted 12/8/11

JoeSurf wrote:


Then you are short sighted, good sir.


Philosophically?

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Posted 12/8/11

CarboKill wrote:


JoeSurf wrote:


Then you are short sighted, good sir.


Philosophically?



Told ya. :p
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Posted 12/8/11

JoeSurf wrote:


Told ya. :p


Told me what?
Posted 12/8/11 , edited 12/8/11
Being a typical INTP, I am going to play Devil's Advocate.

When Two plus Two Does Not Equal Four: Event-Related Potential Responses to Semantically Incongruous Arithmetic Word Problems

Yes, I am ever fascinated by semantics and epistemology. Languages - including math - consist of constructs that have meaning only in what people assign and give consensus to meaning. Math in particular deals with intangibles, i.e. a "point" on a graph doesn't actually exist beyond the reference meaning it is given. I appreciate facts and truths to extremes, yet in my wisdom I understand that there are often very subjective characteristics surrounding many truths.

Two people can agree that a sunset is beautiful to watch, and be psychologically certain they completely understand each other as they affirm this, yet they perceive the same sunset differently.

EDIT: I understand the differences between fact and opinion. I only bring this up, because many people tend to erroneously muddle the two.
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Posted 12/8/11


Thank you for the interesting link.

I'd just like to say that it is my view that you are only thinking this because you expanded your mind. If those two people were to think like children and expand their life, essentially becoming what the mind would describe as braindead yet still conscious, rather than use their mind to agree that the sunset is beautiful to watch, they would perceive the same sunset not differently, but exactly the same, because the one truth of it is that that sunset is how it would appear to everyone's senses if their minds did not interfere - what it actually looks like.
Posted 12/8/11 , edited 12/8/11

CarboKill wrote:



Thank you for the interesting link.

I'd just like to say that it is my view that you are only thinking this because you expanded your mind. If those two people were to think like children and expand their life, essentially becoming what the mind would describe as braindead yet still conscious, rather than use their mind to agree that the sunset is beautiful to watch, they would perceive the same sunset not differently, but exactly the same, because the one truth of it is that that sunset is how it would appear to everyone's senses if their minds did not interfere - what it actually looks like.


OK, I get what you are conveying, however even something as basic as sensory perception can differ among individuals - it certainly does for different species (how I envy Mantis shrimp) - and while we may all agree in what frequency range "red" exists chromatically, it may actually not look exactly the same, if we were able to swap our sensory organs. Our extrinsic understanding is entirely limited by those organs. A person, blind from birth can only rely upon faith in his fellow man that colors even exist.

Are hypercubes merely theoretical, or only unknowable to human perception?

One more link, because this man was my mentor, who passed away earlier this year.
http://mysite.verizon.net/vzepglv8/index.htm
Posted 12/8/11
The only truth I need is the string theory.

Also, too paranoid to click link in OP's initial message. COPY PASTE, PLEASE.
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Posted 12/8/11

AsuraCryin wrote:

The only truth I need is the string theory.


It is not theory...

...it is...

...THE TRUTH.

I feel so epic right now.
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Posted 12/8/11
An opinion can be right or wrong. When one person attempts to communicate with another person, verbally or otherwise, their goal is to communicate an idea. The success of that communication depends on the mutual agreement of the parties as to what the meaning of the, for the sake of argument let's say, "words" mean.

When both people have the same definitions of the given words, then they understand the concept that is meant to be communicated. That concept, is what is commonly known as "opinion." The truth or falsehood of an opinion/idea depends upon the accuracy with which it describes reality. I make this distinction, because I often hear as a response to a thought, "well that's just your opinion." This is true, but it does not mean that my opinion cannot be right or wrong. It does describe a truth, and therefore can be right or wrong.

If I say that "the color blue is awesome," we need only define what blue means, and what awesome means, and if the definitions fit, i.e. blue is a subset of awesome, then we can say that the opinion that "blue is awesome" is right. We acquire the definitions of our words by applying arbitrary sounds to delineate a given category of reality. Thus, perception doesn't make a damn difference to the truth of matter, unless the truth in question regards perception. Then its a simple matter of what is actually perceived. My point is this -- How does perception of reality change reality?
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