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How about we not warp people's minds with pediophilia, better yet...
Posted 1/1/12

silentavian wrote:

LMAO, it's you who try to control people with your words, it's you who brought
up Christianity in this conversation and it's you who chooses to be hateful.
You also choose not to stay on topic, rather constantly bring the conversation
back to a topic you love to hate; religion.


I see you're trying to hold the dogmas in place so you can continue to hate them.
Try again, even though you only have one tactic, hate.
You "hate" girls' freedom to dress in however that they want, for no good reason. You "hate" artistic expression of sexy little girls in anime, for no good reason. You even "hate" kids toon being mature, again for no good reason. Because none of them deal squarely at the root of the problem that was your topic: the vicious cycle of pedophile victimization within the Christian faith, due to unhealthy religious sexual repression, for God's sake.

Not only that, religions had a long history of censoring artistic expressions for no good reason.

When we speak of respect for a diversity of beliefs, we sometimes forget that our beliefs frequently clash. And, because religious groups also form strong political constituencies, beliefs can have powerful political uses. All too often, people are most easily united in opposition to something they hate. And a painting or a play can be easy to hate, as you never have to see it. The fact that Chris Ofili, in his mixed-media work, The Holy Virgin Mary, was approaching the Virgin with religious respect and re-creating her in full glory for another cultural tradition was not politically useful. It was much easier to raise adrenaline levels by simply saying, "dung-smeared Madonna." Who cares that there is no smeared dung on Ofili's work? Works of art are open to many interpretations; they only acquire meaning while interacting with an audience. Some people could well see Renee Cox's nude figure in the center of her recreation of the Last Supper as a personal attack on their views, others would rejoice to see a black woman in that revered position. Attacks on art, unfortunately, too often reduce complex and ambiguous works to simple sound bites.

Yes, images are powerful, yes, they can be subversive of pieties, and yes, they can transgress the boundaries set by tradition. But, before we decide to hate, let us try to understand what we hate, and perhaps see the use of religious imagery as testimony of its continuous relevance and richness, rather than as a single- (and simple-) minded attempt at offense.
(citation)
And in your case, your single- (and simple-) minded soundbite is "hate".

Moreover, you had lost your ability to reason altogether; how am I responsible to upholding the unhealthy religious dogmas, when I'm in no position of power to change? I'm not God.
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Posted 1/1/12
kay im wayy to lazy to read all of this but i do agree,, its not right that young girl are dresses like sluts these says, but the problem is, is that its just the way society is today and we are just going to have to deal with it,, theres nothing we can really do about it cause would u want your daughter to be all covered up completly and be an outcast from everyone cause she shows next to no skin? i dont think so.. everyone will just have to learn that this is the way of life now if we like it or not.. cause at school u could get all the kids to waer uniforms but the girls just roll the skirts up to rediculously short lengths then go back to slutty outfits between school so no matter what theres no winning it unless you somehow make it against the law to waer skimy outfits
Posted 1/1/12 , edited 1/1/12

Susanholland4 wrote:

kay im wayy to lazy to read all of this but i do agree,, its not right that young girl are dresses like sluts these says, but the problem is, is that its just the way society is today and we are just going to have to deal with it,, theres nothing we can really do about it cause would u want your daughter to be all covered up completly and be an outcast from everyone cause she shows next to no skin? i dont think so.. everyone will just have to learn that this is the way of life now if we like it or not.. cause at school u could get all the kids to waer uniforms but the girls just roll the skirts up to rediculously short lengths then go back to slutty outfits between school so no matter what theres no winning it unless you somehow make it against the law to waer skimy outfits

Your mind is a terrible thing to waste, especially when your society seems like a prison.

So when we meet in my philosophy class in his prison and I say, "In this class, we will discuss the foundations of ethics," Tony interrupts me. "What are you going to teach me about right and wrong? I know what is wrong. I have done wrong. I am told every day, by every face I see, every wall I face, that I am wrong. If I ever get out of here, there will always be a mark by my name. I'm a convict; I am branded 'wrong.' What are you going to tell me about right and wrong?"

So I say to Tony, "Sorry, but it's worse than you think. You think you know right and wrong? Then can you tell me what wrong is? No, don't just give me an example. I want to know about wrongness itself, the idea of wrong. What is that idea? What makes something wrong? How do we know that it's wrong? Maybe you and I disagree. Maybe one of us is wrong about the wrong. Maybe it's you, maybe it's me -- but we're not here to trade opinions; everyone's got an opinion. We are here for knowledge. Our enemy is thoughtlessness. This is philosophy."

And something changes for Tony. "Could be I'm wrong. I'm tired of being wrong. I want to know what is wrong. I want to know what I know." What Tony sees in that moment is the project of philosophy, the project that begins in wonder -- what Kant called "admiration and awe at the starry sky above and the moral law within." What can creatures like us know of such things? It is the project that always takes us back to the condition of existence -- what Heidegger called "the always already there." It is the project of questioning what we believe and why we believe it -- what Socrates called "the examined life." Socrates, a man wise enough to know that he knows nothing. Socrates died in prison, his philosophy intact.

So Tony starts doing his homework. He learns his whys and wherefores, his causes and correlations, his logic, his fallacies. Turns out, Tony's got the philosophy muscle. His body is in prison, but his mind is free. Tony learns about the ontologically promiscuous, the epistemologically anxious, the ethically dubious, the metaphysically ridiculous. That's Plato, Descartes, Nietzsche and Bill Clinton.

So when he gives me his final paper, in which he argues that the categorical imperative is perhaps too uncompromising to deal with the conflict that affects our everyday and challenges me to tell him whether therefore we are condemned to moral failure, I say, "I don't know. Let us think about that." Because in that moment, there's no mark by Tony's name; it's just the two of us standing there. It is not professor and convict, it is just two minds ready to do philosophy. And I say to Tony, "Let's do this."
---- from "Damon Horowitz: Philosophy in prison"

Your circular logic system is the prison that your society has intentionally built for all of us by the affluent power elites. Because the societal status quo is working towards their favor, and they'll defend it by making us to resist any real social change on whatever system that's keeping themselves in power.

When we're threatened we defend ourselves—and our systems. Before 9/11, for instance, President George W. Bush was sinking in the polls. But as soon as the planes hit the World Trade Center, the president's approval ratings soared. So did support for Congress and the police. During Hurricane Katrina, America witnessed FEMA's spectacular failure to rescue the hurricane's victims. Yet many people blamed those victims for their fate rather than admitting the agency flunked and supporting ideas for fixing it. In times of crisis, say the authors, we want to believe the system works.

We also defend systems we rely on. In one experiment, students made to feel dependent on their university defended a school funding policy—but disapproved of the same policy if it came from the government, which they didn't perceive as affecting them closely. However, if they felt dependent on the government, they liked the policy originating from it, but not from the school.

When we feel we can't escape a system, we adapt. That includes feeling okay about things we might otherwise consider undesirable. The authors note one study in which participants were told that men's salaries in their country are 20% higher than women's. Rather than implicate an unfair system, those who felt they couldn't emigrate chalked up the wage gap to innate differences between the sexes. "You'd think that when people are stuck with a system, they'd want to change it more," says Kay. But in fact, the more stuck they are, the more likely are they to explain away its shortcomings. Finally, a related phenomenon: The less control people feel over their own lives, the more they endorse systems and leaders that offer a sense of order.

The research on system justification can enlighten those who are frustrated when people don't rise up in what would seem their own best interests. Says Kay: "If you want to understand how to get social change to happen, you need to understand the conditions that make people resist change and what makes them open to acknowledging that change might be a necessity."
---- from"Why do people defend unjust, inept, and corrupt systems?"
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Posted 1/2/12
yeah your very true but i havent been very creative latley and idk why. normally i am and dont have a prision like mind though
Posted 1/2/12 , edited 1/2/12

Susanholland4 wrote:

yeah your very true but i havent been very creative latley and idk why. normally i am and dont have a prision like mind though
I'm only guessing here, since I don't know what's your immediate cultural environment and social surrounding is like. But there's a possibility that you're being manipulated into surrendering your ability to engage your own intrinsic motivations and self-control.

Willpower: Rediscovering the Greatest Human Strength
Leading social psychologist and scientist Roy F. Baumeister’s latest research reveals that the average person spends four hours of their day battling temptation. While self-control is biologically rooted, we have the capacity to manipulate our nature. Willpower works like a muscle that can be strengthened with practice, and fatigued with overuse. Combining the best of modern social science with practical wisdom, Baumeister and Tierney revolutionize our understanding of self-control.

Dan Pink on the surprising science of motivation
Career analyst Dan Pink examines the puzzle of motivation, starting with a fact that social scientists know but most managers don't: Traditional rewards aren't always as effective as we think. Listen for illuminating stories -- and maybe, a way forward.

Now why are your ability to engage your own intrinsic motivations and self-control important to break your prison-like mind conditioning system? Because they are your sense of personal control through your own action, that includes your ability to engage critical thinking skill.

Reviewing laboratory and cross-national studies, the paper illuminates four situations that foster system justification: system threat, system dependence, system inescapability, and low personal control.
---- from "Why do people defend unjust, inept, and corrupt systems?"

Daniel Wolpert: The real reason for brains
Neuroscientist Daniel Wolpert starts from a surprising premise: the brain evolved, not to think or feel, but to control movement. In this entertaining, data-rich talk he gives us a glimpse into how the brain creates the grace and agility of human motion.

Finally, this mind-conditioning system I referred to is your immediate cultural environment and social surrounding. And it could be the cultural value of the illusion of choice, the social meaning of rampant consumerism, and/or the psychosocial internalization of death anxiety, all done through the process of social conformity.
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Posted 1/2/12
mabye. i honestly have no idea anymore what going on in my mind
Posted 1/2/12

Susanholland4 wrote:

mabye. i honestly have no idea anymore what going on in my mind
That's a good start. By yourself knowing and admitting what you don't know, you're ready to rediscover the many possible sides of you.
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Posted 1/3/12

That's a good start. By yourself knowing and admitting what you don't know, you're ready to rediscover the many possible sides of you.

yeah.. well i think i am starting to already cause today i did a major clean out of my room, re-organized, re-arranged the furniture, and re-decorated my room it took about 6 hours but it was so worth it
Posted 1/3/12

Susanholland4 wrote:


That's a good start. By yourself knowing and admitting what you don't know, you're ready to rediscover the many possible sides of you.

yeah.. well i think i am starting to already cause today i did a major clean out of my room, re-organized, re-arranged the furniture, and re-decorated my room it took about 6 hours but it was so worth it :D
That's not what I meant. You'll have to take a hard stand and begin critically questioning everything you thought you knew up to now, in order for yourself to come into an understanding that you can only be certain at knowing what you don't know. While everything else you thought you once knew were just beliefs that you have. Then from that point onward, you can take onto the disposition of a truth-seeker.
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Posted 1/3/12

That's not what I meant. You'll have to take a hard stand and begin critically questioning everything you thought you knew up to now, in order for yourself to come into an understanding that you can only be certain at knowing what you don't know. While everything else you thought you once knew were just beliefs that you have. Then from that point onward, you can take onto the disposition of a truth-seeker.


Well i have already and always really think about stuff really hard before i decide to believe in things..
im also always looking and trying new things so i can understand myself and others better..like dont believe everything is chosen by fait,, you create yourself and choose your own furture
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