First  Prev  1  2  3  Next  Last
Girl Scout Launches Cookie Boycott
Posted 6/19/12
Transgender lol.....
31 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
25 / M / USA
Offline
Posted 6/19/12
I know it's a male that believes she's female. That's why I'm giving her the respect of referring to her as a girl because she is a transwoman and would probably not appreciate being called a boy who wants to be a girl because she is a girl

Yes the issue is "no boys in girls scouts/no girls in boy scouts" to the scouts, but the issue in my eyes is that the scouts don't understand that this so called "boy who wants to be a girl" is in fact a girl and should be allowed to be in the girl scouts if she wants too.

Also I was merely commenting on the whole "she's 7" thing because that had been brought up in earlier posts.
23028 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
17 / M / boys locker room
Offline
Posted 6/19/12 , edited 6/19/12
I know how that girl feels, I'm not allowed to go to all-boys religious schools for some reason ;_; Sadsies. Why must they keep me away from all the sweet schoolboys if it's very clear that I'm a boy??

Oh, and I like the peanut butter cookies, I always buy them anyways.
Posted 6/19/12
At 7 does it really matter, this just sounds like bigotry to me.
w6loy 
40652 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
61 / F / by the beach in S...
Offline
Posted 6/19/12 , edited 6/19/12
I'm buying cookies. I was in the Brownies (junior Girl Scouts) and think the Girl Scouts did the right thing. The girl in Ventura needs to get some education about what it means to be transgendered. Her attitudes are the reason that 40% of transgender youths commit suicide in this country. That she is 7 doesn't matter.
Ventura girl,as with so many others, confuses sex (what genitals we have) with gender (how we identify internally).

A friend I know knew as young as age 3 that she felt she was wrongly gendered. She was at the beach and, being male bodied, had to use the mens' change room. Yet, she felt that it was the wrong room to be going in. Since that time, she's always sensed that something was different and has only recently realized that she's transgender. She's happier now that she's transitioning from presenting as male to presenting as female (dressing as female and currently taking hormones). I know refer to this person by her new name or the appropriate pronoun.

I think it shouldn't be a problem for the other girls to have a transgender girl in their troop. Unless the adults make a fuss, they probably wouldn't know that currently she's still "male bodied". She isn't a threat to them. I base this on what my transwoman friend told me about how she felt growing up. She wanted to play with the girls' toys and tried to treat the girls not as a boy would but as a girl would. Because of this he was often made fun of and in high school was thought of as weird or was labeled as gay. I kind of understand her situation (although I didn't have it quite so rough). I was a tomboy....though a girl, I liked playing with boys' toys (Hot Wheels, Lincoln Logs, Tinker Toy). This was in the 60's (yes, I'm giving my age away :P). The difference between my friend and myself is that society then ,and now, holds that it's ok for a girl to be boyish but not for a boy to be girlish. So, society needs work on the equality thing quite a bit more.

Sorry for the long post....just had a lot to say on this.
44529 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
25 / M / My house, probabl...
Offline
Posted 6/19/12
I would love to buy cookies, but this kind of thing rarely happens in my country.... sad, so sad. i like cookies. LOVE cookies

44295 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
36 / M / Staten Island, NY...
Offline
Posted 6/19/12

w6loy wrote:

I'm buying cookies. I was in the Brownies (junior Girl Scouts) and think the Girl Scouts did the right thing. The girl in Ventura needs to get some education about what it means to be transgendered. Her attitudes are the reason that 40% of transgender youths commit suicide in this country. That she is 7 doesn't matter.
Ventura girl,as with so many others, confuses sex (what genitals we have) with gender (how we identify internally).

A friend I know knew as young as age 3 that she felt she was wrongly gendered. She was at the beach and, being male bodied, had to use the mens' change room. Yet, she felt that it was the wrong room to be going in. Since that time, she's always sensed that something was different and has only recently realized that she's transgender. She's happier now that she's transitioning from presenting as male to presenting as female (dressing as female and currently taking hormones). I know refer to this person by her new name or the appropriate pronoun.

I think it shouldn't be a problem for the other girls to have a transgender girl in their troop. Unless the adults make a fuss, they probably wouldn't know that currently she's still "male bodied". She isn't a threat to them. I base this on what my transwoman friend told me about how she felt growing up. She wanted to play with the girls' toys and tried to treat the girls not as a boy would but as a girl would. Because of this he was often made fun of and in high school was thought of as weird or was labeled as gay. I kind of understand her situation (although I didn't have it quite so rough). I was a tomboy....though a girl, I liked playing with boys' toys (Hot Wheels, Lincoln Logs, Tinker Toy). This was in the 60's (yes, I'm giving my age away :P). The difference between my friend and myself is that society then ,and now, holds that it's ok for a girl to be boyish but not for a boy to be girlish. So, society needs work on the equality thing quite a bit more.

Sorry for the long post....just had a lot to say on this.


Well said. You just saved me a lot of typing. I came here to post something very similar.
Rajyrr 
35171 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
26 / M / Nova Scotia, Canada
Offline
Posted 6/19/12
At the age of 7, what exactly do they mean by "very dangerous"? Do they mean diabetes is very dangerous? If so, I agree.

If they're suggesting she's a vicious cannibal that's going to devour all the other little girls, they may have some personal issues to sort out. Or maybe it's just prejudice. Either way ..
43522 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
26 / M
Offline
Posted 6/19/12 , edited 6/19/12
But I wouldn't want to buy girl scout cookies anyway.
43522 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
26 / M
Offline
Posted 6/19/12

lackofimagination wrote:


i_love_u_jesus wrote:

But I wouldn't want to buy girl scout cookies anyway.


What if I made you have sex with Rajyrr?


Hmm, interesting, but I think I still wouldn't want any of those cookies.
31 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
25 / M / USA
Offline
Posted 6/19/12

GodWhomIsMike wrote:


w6loy wrote:

I'm buying cookies. I was in the Brownies (junior Girl Scouts) and think the Girl Scouts did the right thing. The girl in Ventura needs to get some education about what it means to be transgendered. Her attitudes are the reason that 40% of transgender youths commit suicide in this country. That she is 7 doesn't matter.
Ventura girl,as with so many others, confuses sex (what genitals we have) with gender (how we identify internally).

A friend I know knew as young as age 3 that she felt she was wrongly gendered. She was at the beach and, being male bodied, had to use the mens' change room. Yet, she felt that it was the wrong room to be going in. Since that time, she's always sensed that something was different and has only recently realized that she's transgender. She's happier now that she's transitioning from presenting as male to presenting as female (dressing as female and currently taking hormones). I know refer to this person by her new name or the appropriate pronoun.

I think it shouldn't be a problem for the other girls to have a transgender girl in their troop. Unless the adults make a fuss, they probably wouldn't know that currently she's still "male bodied". She isn't a threat to them. I base this on what my transwoman friend told me about how she felt growing up. She wanted to play with the girls' toys and tried to treat the girls not as a boy would but as a girl would. Because of this he was often made fun of and in high school was thought of as weird or was labeled as gay. I kind of understand her situation (although I didn't have it quite so rough). I was a tomboy....though a girl, I liked playing with boys' toys (Hot Wheels, Lincoln Logs, Tinker Toy). This was in the 60's (yes, I'm giving my age away :P). The difference between my friend and myself is that society then ,and now, holds that it's ok for a girl to be boyish but not for a boy to be girlish. So, society needs work on the equality thing quite a bit more.

Sorry for the long post....just had a lot to say on this.


Well said. You just saved me a lot of typing. I came here to post something very similar.


Thank you both, you just saved me some more typing as well!
8670 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
30 / M / Gotham City
Offline
Posted 6/19/12
I'd kill a man over thin mints.
First  Prev  1  2  3  Next  Last
You must be logged in to post.