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Respect for the law
Posted 2/15/12
Respect for the law, people.
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F / потерян
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Posted 2/19/12
fuck da police.
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Posted 2/19/12 , edited 2/19/12
@D01 Lol yeah yeah yeah thats what they say but then u see them in jail.


Oh but i respect it ....sometimes
Posted 2/19/12
I respect myself and that's a law of mine.
Posted 2/19/12
If you want to know, shove a bomb up his ass and say you're paying tribute to his name. If you don't get thrown in jail, it's probably not illegal.
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26 / M / only kami neko knows
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Posted 4/10/12
I'd piss on the law if I could, but since I can't I'd just break it.
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Posted 4/11/12
Respect is not a right; it must be given to be deserved.
The one is position of authority should give respect first. If they demand it, like many police often do, I won't give it.

And you can disrespect the law as much as you want as long as you don't get caught.
Posted 4/11/12

BlaculaKuchuki wrote:

I think there's a slight misunderstanding of the concept of 'disrespecting' a police officer or judge. You see, I can freely disrespect a police officer or judge as much as I want (don't be moronic when interpreting that phrase). There is nothing sacred about police, judges, or senators. What I CAN'T do, though (at least not without legal ramifications), is disrespect those officials in a manner that would interfere with their ability to carry out their duties. So, I can say that a particular judge is the most incompetent moron ever to sit in a courtroom...I just can't say it in that judge's courtroom while that judge is presiding. If I hear about a police officer doing something...in poor taste...I can single out that one cop and pretty much say whatever I want about him as long as it isn't specifically libelous/slanderous. The cop in question may decide to figure some way to make an example out of me, but there isn't a law against me criticizing a particular police officer, or a particular police department, unless I'm doing it in front of them in a way that can be interpreted as making their job at that moment more difficult.

Similarly, I can say whatever the hell I want about the president (short of threats upon his person), as long as those statements do not interfere with the president's ability to carry out the duties of his office.

Yeah, there is some squish room for interpretation, which is where the courts come in, but most judgements have leaned towards protection of freedom of speech.

Now, yes, I read the article about the UK kid, but that's not the same case as with an American citizen speaking about an American president. I'm covered by my constitution...I would not expect the same protections in regards to public figures outside of my country of citizenship. Barring a foreign national from entry into the country is a matter for the State department, and involves a whole realm of laws and other considerations that have nothing to do with the rights of citizens within the nation. For the record, many countries, including the UK, have banned specific citizens from other nations from entry based entirely on something they've said -- I know of at least one major UK case where an American citizen was banned from entry because of statements he made outside of the UK, to an American audience, which had absolutely nothing to do with the UK or international matters at all.

In terms of modern attitudes vs. the past, things do change, and I do think there is some degree of ludicrous factionalism going on right now (and I really do not see one side as having any claim to moral authority in this matter). However, looking at the history of American politics, ever since the first days of the Republic, there have been absolutely disrespectful and downright nasty editorials about standing politicians, presidents, and judges in the very earliest of newspapers.

In other words, disrespectful statements about the president, whether well-considered or simply following some kind of childish fashion trend, are nothing new.


Thanks for breaking my glasses.
Posted 4/11/12
In England, if you need a piss and ask a policemen for their hat to pee in, they are legally obliged to give you their hat. True story.
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