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Love Martial Arts, but hate fighting
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22 / F / United Kingdom
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Posted 2/21/12
I would love to learn a martial art. Not because I wanna go around kicking everyones asses but because it's a great thing to know. Also, it is meant to be for self defence so knowing it would make you feel safer when you are out in town at night or whatever.
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17 / M / ᴷᴬᴹᴱ ᴴᴼᵁᴯᴱ
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Posted 2/21/12

eclair-lumiere wrote:

I would love to learn a martial art. Not because I wanna go around kicking everyones asses but because it's a great thing to know. Also, it is meant to be for self defence so knowing it would make you feel safer when you are out in town at night or whatever.


Lol, I'm with you on that :D, though I agree fighting is something I don't want to do because it can cause people to go against you or be with you, and then things will happen and it will cause conflict and whatnot. But then again I would love to learn martial arts to fight an opponent and become stronger and stronger and more stronger than my opponent if he/she were to become my rival. It sounds great to me in some weird way
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26 / M / Other
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Posted 2/21/12
It sounds like the general philosophy of your dojo has changed, from a more martial (possibly) aspect to a more sporting aspect.

In my area, a lot of the dojos are all about sport (if there's a sporting competition for it) and those that aren't are more focused combining the philosophical aspect with the physical aspect.

I could also be a case of peoples mindset or philosophy has changed over time, most of my peers think of martial arts as a contact sport where the goal it to "win" with a points system, where as I view martial arts in a more traditional sense of military usage where the goal is to "survive" by killing or incapacitating your opponent. Unfortunately finding a person that teaches with a philosophy close to mine is extremely difficult these days.
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36 / M
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Posted 2/21/12
I'd suggest visiting other dojo / dojang in your area and observing them. Most instructors are okay with people watching the class, and some are likely to invite you to participate. It's great if you can find another Taekwondo dojang to train at, but if not, karate's been pretty good for me so far.

You may need to watch a few classes to get a proper feel. Don't be shy about showing up randomly through out the week.

We had a Taekwondo guy in our dojo last Fall. He had been training TKD for more than 12 years, but there's no dojang in my town. Our class was the next best thing. Sparring with him was a great experience.
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22 / M
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Posted 2/21/12
hmm doesn't look like this class is for you, leave it and move on find something you actually enjoy.If you keep forcing yourself to go to a class you don't like you will eventually hate the art.Most dojos have a non sparring element and there's nothing wrong with not wanting to spar because you don't want to hurt anyone.If you don't want people to make a big fuss about it just tell them you tried sparring once......and you killed a man!!
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21 / Dreamscape
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Posted 2/21/12
I've been in TKD since 4th grade. While I haven't personally been in a group that is all about competition, I can see how it may discourage the person who was there for the exercise, camaraderie and the mental cleansing. But when you come down to it martial arts is a self-defence technique made for keeping you alive since it was originally meant for military use. (May be wrong on that) So sparring is a big part of the martial art itself. But if that's all they ever teach then you may want to see if there are any other clubs or dojos for TKD in your area. Or you may want to branch out into another martial art. that supplements your TKD training. The instructor that I'm learning from mixes TKD with modern arnis.

Posted 3/27/12
Taekwondo is a very aggressive style but your club shouldn't forget the morals, sparring should be controlled and they should show good sportsmanship. A simple definition of sportsmanship within it would be, instead of jumping around like an idiot cheering when you KO someone, help them up. If you can find one, look for a club that trains under Hwoarang-Do, the oldest form of Taekwondo and has none of the flashy business. As fun as the gymnastics is, our club prefers to do things the traditional way.

-If you're looking for a new, fresh technique then I suggest Krav Maga. They don't mess around, it is pure self defense and nothing else. I came face to face with a 12inch knife on my first lesson lol! Later on in the lesson I learned every way possible to disarm that knife from the wielder. We did guns in week 2 its great! But I still love Taekwondo as a sport, its spectacular in its own right.

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22 / Great White North
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Posted 3/27/12 , edited 3/27/12
Been in taekwon-do as well, joined it for the exercise (they're really tough on you there) and self-defense. Stopped due to being really busy with school and just life in general.
Lexxuk 
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38 / M / United Kingdom
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Posted 3/27/12
I'd say shop around for another club or try your hand at another martial art. I wouldn't recommend just dropping in randomly though, with my dojo (karate) you're not allowed to just visit because the people running the club have to think about the safety of their members (kids may be present, even though it was an adult class, so having people randomly drop in would be bad form).

Got to admit though, was very hard not to point out to the assistant that he wasn't pronouncing 6 correctly.

But yeah, there are plenty of different martial arts out there, just because you're great at one doesn't mean you won't have issues learning another (for instance, you may find your balance isn't as good as you thought if you try karate) but the more you learn the more you'll be able to improve your natural skill set, and of course find a dojo that meets your philosophy.
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