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Things You've Learned About Yourself
Posted 2/25/12
Part of life is getting to know ourselves from personal experiences. Whether it is from interactions with others, or from taking time to think things through alone. Developing your unique persona takes top priority when finding your place in the world.
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Posted 3/2/12
For me I know that through personal experiences helps me to continue my shaping of myself. I think its an ongoing thing through out life that we continue to grow and understand ourselves.
Posted 3/2/12
I've learned I'm not good with time, since Im a workaholic and don't get other things done - but they say you dont really know yourself until you experience Burning Man, which is my goal when I hit 30.
Posted 3/2/12

DeusExMachine wrote:

Part of life is getting to know ourselves from personal experiences. Whether it is from interactions with others, or from taking time to think things through alone. Developing your unique persona takes top priority when finding your place in the world.

IkkiTheFang wrote:

For me I know that through personal experiences helps me to continue my shaping of myself. I think its an ongoing thing through out life that we continue to grow and understand ourselves.
The thing is when you perceive personal development and growth in such fashion, there isn't anything unique about our "originality" as the word suggests. Instead, we end up connecting to a shared common origin, or what you would call it our common "place in the world".


JListCharlie wrote:

I've learned I'm not good with time, since Im a workaholic and don't get other things done - but they say you dont really know yourself until you experience Burning Man, which is my goal when I hit 30.
Careful now, for that could just easily be a marketing scam to get you addicted on certain behaviour. You might be better off learning how to transform your experience without yourself relying on material means for mere pleasure, and not sustainable enjoyment.

Dan Gilbert: Why are we happy? Why aren't we happy?
Dan Gilbert, author of Stumbling on Happiness, challenges the idea that well be miserable if we dont get what we want. Our "psychological immune system" lets us feel truly happy even when things don't go as planned.

Dopamine Jackpot! Sapolsky on the Science of Pleasure
Robert Sapolsky, professor of biology and neurology at Stanford University, compares dopamine levels in monkeys and humans. Sapolsky argues that in both, "Dopamine is not about pleasure, it's about the anticipation of pleasure. It's about the pursuit of happiness." Unlike monkeys however, humans "keep those dopamine levels up for decades and decades waiting for the reward."
So don't get doped by whatever scams masking as mere tempting promises of pleasurable experience.
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Posted 3/2/12
@DomFortress

If we percieve things in our own and deduce our own out comes and take things our way wouldnt you say thats pretty original? And since every person is not the same, the way we understand things are different as well. In that sense I think regardless of our common like you said, I still think we are unique or original in our own way yet share a common ground still.
Posted 3/2/12

DomFortress wrote:


DeusExMachine wrote:

Part of life is getting to know ourselves from personal experiences. Whether it is from interactions with others, or from taking time to think things through alone. Developing your unique persona takes top priority when finding your place in the world.

IkkiTheFang wrote:

For me I know that through personal experiences helps me to continue my shaping of myself. I think its an ongoing thing through out life that we continue to grow and understand ourselves.


The thing is when you perceive personal development and growth in such fashion, there isn't anything unique about our "originality" as the word suggests. Instead, we end up connecting to a shared common origin, or what you would call it our common "place in the world".


I had a thought. You could consider, in some ways, Apple's whole "i" concept as a way Apple users refer to themselves. "i have the latest iPhone" or "i have a MacBook." What would they learn about themselves then after having spent so much time engrossed in using their fad gadgetry?

Posted 3/2/12

IkkiTheFang wrote:

@DomFortress

If we percieve things in our own and deduce our own out comes and take things our way wouldnt you say thats pretty original? And since every person is not the same, the way we understand things are different as well. In that sense I think regardless of our common like you said, I still think we are unique or original in our own way yet share a common ground still.
There's only so far that path can take us, before we become self-deceiving. Our own biological, neurological, physical, sociological, mental, and psychological limitations are the same for roughly 95% of us with a normal brain that's capable of morality. Thereby what's actually unique of us in terms of our personality and attitude, are the cultural legacies that we were conditioned into.

Michael Shermer: The pattern behind self-deception
Michael Shermer says the human tendency to believe strange things -- from alien abductions to dowsing rods -- boils down to two of the brain's most basic, hard-wired survival skills. He explains what they are, and how they get us into trouble.

Paul Zak: Trust, morality - and oxytocin
Where does morality come from -- physically, in the brain? In this talk neuroeconomist Paul Zak shows why he believes oxytocin (he calls it "the moral molecule") is responsible for trust, empathy, and other feelings that help build a stable society.

Sheena Iyengar: The art of choosing
Sheena Iyengar studies how we make choices -- and how we feel about the choices we make. At TEDGlobal, she talks about both trivial choices (Coke v. Pepsi) and profound ones, and shares her groundbreaking research that has uncovered some surprising attitudes about our decisions.
And in your case, even your own desire for originality and uniqueness could be in great part due to your childhood cultural conditioning called "self-esteem boost", a marketing technique that's often being used in proxy parenting aka child commercials.

You're Not So Special
"Are We in a Narcissism Epidemic?...Why you're not so special" -from recent Newsweek Magazine. People are talking about parental overpraise all over the Web these days, JBJ included. Sound off here!

Consuming Kids: The Commercialization of Childhood [Full Film]
Consuming Kids throws desperately needed light on the practices of a relentless multi-billion dollar marketing machine that now sells kids and their parents everything from junk food and violent video games to bogus educational products and the family car. Drawing on the insights of health care professionals, children's advocates, and industry insiders, the film focuses on the explosive growth of child marketing in the wake of deregulation, showing how youth marketers have used the latest advances in psychology, anthropology, and neuroscience to transform American children into one of the most powerful and profitable consumer demographics in the world. Consuming Kids pushes back against the wholesale commercialization of childhood, raising urgent questions about the ethics of children's marketing and its impact on the health and well-being of kids.
So what are the consequences of this powerful and deliberately manipulative cultural conditioning? Well we don't need to look so far than from the social and moral failures within our modern society.

"I Am Fishead" Are Corporate Leaders Egotistical Psychopaths ?
This Must See Very Unique Video sheds light on the human mental condition in every day life from the common Citizen to the Corporate Leaders.Unmasking the Psychopath,Many will find this video quite insightful,A must watch video that should be shared with all who thirst for such knowledge.
Posted 3/2/12

DeusExMachine wrote:


DomFortress wrote:


The thing is when you perceive personal development and growth in such fashion, there isn't anything unique about our "originality" as the word suggests. Instead, we end up connecting to a shared common origin, or what you would call it our common "place in the world".


I had a thought. You could consider, in some ways, Apple's whole "i" concept as a way Apple users refer to themselves. "i have the latest iPhone" or "i have a MacBook." What would they learn about themselves then after having spent so much time engrossed in using their fad gadgetry?
I would think that they'll be homogenized and assimilated under the Apple branding process, and would affluent others in order for themselves to justify their own feeling of worthiness through sheer popularity.
Posted 3/2/12

DomFortress wrote:


DeusExMachine wrote:


DomFortress wrote:


The thing is when you perceive personal development and growth in such fashion, there isn't anything unique about our "originality" as the word suggests. Instead, we end up connecting to a shared common origin, or what you would call it our common "place in the world".


I had a thought. You could consider, in some ways, Apple's whole "i" concept as a way Apple users refer to themselves. "i have the latest iPhone" or "i have a MacBook." What would they learn about themselves then after having spent so much time engrossed in using their fad gadgetry?
I would think that they'll be homogenized and assimilated under the Apple branding process, and would affluent others in order for themselves to justify their own feeling of worthiness through sheer popularity.


Christian fundamentalists come to mind, as Christianity has won the popularity contest many times. And it seems that people feel as if they have discovered their "worthiness" through acceptance into this popular group of followers, which tend to be just as hypocritical and rhetorical as anyone else touting some kind of illogical and nearly impossible to follow morality.

Branding... cattle are branded. Like beasts lead to water, these devout adherents to Jehovah's words drink the proverbial Kool-Aid, but it cannot be helped, for the chemical, hard wired mental training they received is nigh irreversible, if they were so deaf to have listened.
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Posted 3/2/12
Dom, each person is special; emotions are real for some people, and not an intellectual phenomenon; material things can make some people happy.

I learned that I have many self destructive tendencies and am not a conventionally worthwhile person. And I like pleasure a lot, and was smart but aren't anymore, and had willpower but don't anymore.
Posted 3/2/12

ChrisNP wrote:

Dom, each person is special; emotions are real for some people, and not an intellectual phenomenon; material things can make some people happy.

I learned that I have many self destructive tendencies and am not a conventionally worthwhile person. And I like pleasure a lot, and was smart but aren't anymore, and had willpower but don't anymore.


Not to be an @$$hole, but you've found yourself to be a bit of a slob, and shaping up is all the more worthwhile when you've fallen.

As for people being special, you will come to find that some are only defined by, for instance, their addictions. Material gains are superficial and very temporary in the empty pleasure they provide. Here is an intellectual phenomenon; awakening of your true sense of self. Which when compared to the mask worn when external facets are exemplified, is a foundation for true happiness to be built upon.
Posted 3/2/12

ChrisNP wrote:

Dom, each person is special; emotions are real for some people, and not an intellectual phenomenon; material things can make some people happy.

I learned that I have many self destructive tendencies and am not a conventionally worthwhile person. And I like pleasure a lot, and was smart but aren't anymore, and had willpower but don't anymore.
I'm not saying emotions aren't real, when the fact is real human emotional expressions account for all humans' nonverbal communications, which are by themselves account for at least 80% of all known human communication. In other words, our spoken and written words alone can mean very little to us humans as social animals.

However, to believe that mere symbols and languages/words can have real emotions is self-deceiving. That includes materials which are merely cultural symbols of social status and wealth, when they are actually our mistaken expectations aka "impact bias", money included.

Benjamin Wallace on the price of happiness
Can happiness be bought? To find out, author Benjamin Wallace sampled the world's most expensive products, including a bottle of 1947 Chateau Cheval Blanc, 8 ounces of Kobe beef and the fabled (notorious) Kopi Luwak coffee. His critique may surprise you.

"... I just wanted to finish by mentioning a very interesting study which came out earlier this year from some researchers at Stanford and Caltech. And they gave subjects the same wine, labeled with different price tags. A lot of people, you know, said that they liked the more expensive wine more -- it was the same wine, but they thought it was a different one that was more expensive. But what was unexpected was that these researchers did MRI brain imaging while the people were drinking the wine, and not only did they say they enjoyed the more expensively labeled wine more -- their brain actually registered as experiencing more pleasure from the same wine when it was labeled with a higher price tag."

Dan Gilbert on our mistaken expectations
Dan Gilbert presents research and data from his exploration of happiness -- sharing some surprising tests and experiments that you can also try on yourself. Watch through to the end for a sparkling Q&A with some familiar TED faces.

"Well, the question with which I'd like to end is this: If we're so damn stupid, how did we get to the moon? Because I could go on for about two hours with evidence of people's inability to estimate odds and inability to estimate value.

The answer to this question, I think, is an answer you've already heard in some of the talks, and I dare say you will hear again: namely, that our brains were evolved for a very different world than the one in which we are living. They were evolved for a world in which people lived in very small groups, rarely met anybody who was terribly different from themselves, had rather short lives in which there were few choices and the highest priority was to eat and mate today.

Bernoulli's gift, Bernoulli's little formula, allows us, it tells us how we should think in a world for which nature never designed us. That explains why we are so bad at using it, but it also explains why it is so terribly important that we become good, fast. We are the only species on this planet that has ever held its own fate in its hands. We have no significant predators, we're the masters of our physical environment; the things that normally cause species to become extinct are no longer any threat to us. The only thing -- the only thing -- that can destroy us and doom us are our own decisions. If we're not here in 10,000 years, it's going to be because we could not take advantage of the gift given to us by a young Dutch fellow in 1738, because we underestimated the odds of our future pains and overestimated the value of our present pleasures. "

TEDxTransmedia 2011 - Jem Bendell - The Money Myth
Jem Bendell is a professor and the owner-director of Lifeworth Consulting, providing solutions for systemic change towards sustainable development. For 16 years he has consulted with business, United Nations (UN) and civil society, while writing over 100 publications on the social responsibility of organisations.

In TEDxTransmedia he denounces the crisis in the monetary system.
Finally, if you're on anti-depression medication, then your own emotions won't even feel real to yourself. Because that's what those medications are designed to do: they numb all of your emotions, not just the negative ones. In this context, how can you even feel real pleasure?
Posted 3/2/12

DomFortress wrote:


ChrisNP wrote:

Dom, each person is special; emotions are real for some people, and not an intellectual phenomenon; material things can make some people happy.

I learned that I have many self destructive tendencies and am not a conventionally worthwhile person. And I like pleasure a lot, and was smart but aren't anymore, and had willpower but don't anymore.
I'm not saying emotions aren't real, when the fact is real human emotional expressions account for all humans' nonverbal communications, which are by themselves account for at least 80% of all known human communication. In other words, our spoken and written words alone can mean very little to us humans as social animals.

However, to believe that mere symbols and languages/words can have real emotions is self-deceiving. That includes materials which are merely cultural symbols of social status and wealth, when they are actually our mistaken expectations aka "impact bias", money included.

Benjamin Wallace on the price of happiness
Can happiness be bought? To find out, author Benjamin Wallace sampled the world's most expensive products, including a bottle of 1947 Chateau Cheval Blanc, 8 ounces of Kobe beef and the fabled (notorious) Kopi Luwak coffee. His critique may surprise you.

"... I just wanted to finish by mentioning a very interesting study which came out earlier this year from some researchers at Stanford and Caltech. And they gave subjects the same wine, labeled with different price tags. A lot of people, you know, said that they liked the more expensive wine more -- it was the same wine, but they thought it was a different one that was more expensive. But what was unexpected was that these researchers did MRI brain imaging while the people were drinking the wine, and not only did they say they enjoyed the more expensively labeled wine more -- their brain actually registered as experiencing more pleasure from the same wine when it was labeled with a higher price tag."

Dan Gilbert on our mistaken expectations
Dan Gilbert presents research and data from his exploration of happiness -- sharing some surprising tests and experiments that you can also try on yourself. Watch through to the end for a sparkling Q&A with some familiar TED faces.

"Well, the question with which I'd like to end is this: If we're so damn stupid, how did we get to the moon? Because I could go on for about two hours with evidence of people's inability to estimate odds and inability to estimate value.

The answer to this question, I think, is an answer you've already heard in some of the talks, and I dare say you will hear again: namely, that our brains were evolved for a very different world than the one in which we are living. They were evolved for a world in which people lived in very small groups, rarely met anybody who was terribly different from themselves, had rather short lives in which there were few choices and the highest priority was to eat and mate today.

Bernoulli's gift, Bernoulli's little formula, allows us, it tells us how we should think in a world for which nature never designed us. That explains why we are so bad at using it, but it also explains why it is so terribly important that we become good, fast. We are the only species on this planet that has ever held its own fate in its hands. We have no significant predators, we're the masters of our physical environment; the things that normally cause species to become extinct are no longer any threat to us. The only thing -- the only thing -- that can destroy us and doom us are our own decisions. If we're not here in 10,000 years, it's going to be because we could not take advantage of the gift given to us by a young Dutch fellow in 1738, because we underestimated the odds of our future pains and overestimated the value of our present pleasures. "

TEDxTransmedia 2011 - Jem Bendell - The Money Myth
Jem Bendell is a professor and the owner-director of Lifeworth Consulting, providing solutions for systemic change towards sustainable development. For 16 years he has consulted with business, United Nations (UN) and civil society, while writing over 100 publications on the social responsibility of organisations.

In TEDxTransmedia he denounces the crisis in the monetary system.
Finally, if you're on anti-depression medication, then your own emotions won't even feel real to yourself. Because that's what those medications are designed to do: they numb all of your emotions, not just the negative ones. In this context, how can you even feel real pleasure?


I have experienced the numbness of anti-depressants. Currently, I am on a rather mild - at least to me - anti-psychotic, (Seroquel) which seems as if I am not even taking a drug at all. I may as well quit taking it, with a doctor's approval, of course. It would save me some money.

Ultimately, what I learned about myself is that I don't favor drug use causing such inauthentic emotions over what I feel naturally.
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Posted 3/5/12
The most exhilarating discovery of my life which I've made so far as it pertains to me is that it all pertains to me!!!!

By this I mean I don't have to succumb to anyone else's definition, opinion or criticism of me. Not that I'm advocating narcissism or unrealistic views of my world, but I do advocate being true to ones self w/o allowing the input of others to unduly inject doubts & uncertainty into my life, nor to allow them to dictate change or outcomes contrary to my plans or expectations.
This process & attitude has really helped lift the great weight of guilt over failed performance & fear or worry concerning that almighty public appearance game society inflicts on the unwary.

& it makes self discovery not only easier but also a whole more fun!!
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Posted 3/24/12
Everyone seems to be getting alittle in dept into the topic but i'm just gonna answer to the title.

These past few years around my same crew of friends made me learn a couple of things about myself. I can't be considered as a great friend, but i've got to give myself credit that i tried my best to maintain all the relationship among us. I've also found out that i have a huge pride that i can't put down. That's irony when it comes to a point when it stands in the way of a apology. Also, i've not exactly search for what i want in my life. I am hoping some day i'll find it. However, that seems a little difficult. How can i find something that maybe someone at 60 haven't even found yet? Lastly, i've learned that people judge, no matter how much they say they don't.

However, life isn't over yet. So until then maybe i'll get back here and report about what i've learned.
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