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Do Seiyuu have to deal with dub haters when dubbing cartoons into Japanese?
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Posted 6/13/12

TheAncientOne wrote:

Even when you account for Japan's population being only 41% of the U.S., I think you'll have a difficult time coming up with an OVA in the past 5 years that sold over 66,195 copies (41% of the lowest selling title on that list), much less 280,510 (41% of the highest).

The fifth volume of Gundam Unicorn (released last week) sold 145,449 copies in it's first week of sales.

The Wise Wizard
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Posted 6/14/12 , edited 6/14/12

llamaben wrote:
The fifth volume of Gundam Unicorn (released last week) sold 145,449 copies in it's first week of sales.


The numbers I was using didn't include BD sales. Here is an example of how that might affect the numbers:

Among the three new DC Universe Animated Original Movie titles, the July 2010 Batman: Under the Red Hood animated feature made the biggest splash of this years releases, moving 510,000 DVD units and nearly 275,000 Blu-ray units since hitting shelves. Home video retail outlets are expecting the title to finish with at least 800,000 of combined units sold by the end of 2010. The direct-to-video Batman: Under the Red Hood animated feature debuted to 140,000 DVD copies sold in its first week of sales, during the week ending August 1st, 2010.

Keep in mind it was #3 on that list.

No luck finding how the #1 title fared on BD, but I did find this interesting tidbit on the DVD. Sales actually rose from week 1 to week 2 (big jump), and then again to week 3. Don't most anime peak their first week out?

I did find a message in this forum that gave the first week sales for a number of titles. The lowest ranked title (Batman: Year One) from my earlier list shows first week sales of 65,000 for DVD and 102,000 for Blu-ray. Based on the combined total of 167,000 for first week sales alone, 41% would be 68,470. This apparently beats the first week sales for Madoka Magica (62,041 per this site), which itself broke a record set by Bakemonogatari. I note the following week numbers for show a very steep drop off, following the pattern I expected for anime.

The DC DVD + BD First Week Sales List:


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Posted 6/14/12

visoredavenger wrote:


Mertonan wrote:

The real problem is you assume the average Japanese person cares about American animation.

They don't. American animation does terrible in Japan and not noteworthy


So you are saying American animation is a niche market in Japan since they bother to dub it in the first place means enough people are watching it to make it profitable.

Just like Anime is a niche market in the West since stuff like King of the Hill blows away anime.


The average American doesn't care about anime either ,and yet a bit of this niche market rages out of control over dubs.



Yup, it also seems like they are trying to make excuses for Japan, seeing as anime here, is the same as anime (note: all of it is called anime in Japan) from the US in Japan...>.>

As for the actual topic, yes, there are probably purists there too, just like we have here, though they probably aren't as annoying as the people here who go on and on about it
Posted 6/14/12
meh.

sames goes with animes with English dubs so, everything's even imo <<;;
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Posted 6/14/12
http://www.siliconera.com/2010/02/22/subs-or-dubs-which-does-japan-prefer-for-western-games/. In this, the only categories that the Japanese preferred subbed were RPG and Xbox 360. In those, I find it fair to assume that some of those games have the cartoon-style graphics. Of course, cartoons aren't limited to TV or movies.
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Posted 6/15/12

TheAncientOne wrote:


Mertonan wrote:
Yes, Conan is a kids show watched by people of all ages. 6 year old kids to grandparents.

"For kids only" being the main point.

Interesting flexibility in definitions there.



You're directly comparing two different countries broadcasting. I hope you realize how idiotic and baseless that is. The seperation of demographics in America alone makes the comparison worthless (only MALES of a certain age get counted for something'? What about females?)

Please point out where I mentioned the word "males" anywhere in there. In the event you made the illogical assumption that I simply left that out, here is the latest listing from that site:
http://tvbythenumbers.zap2it.com/2012/06/12/tv-ratings-broadcast-top-25-americas-got-talent-tops-week-38-viewing/137537/




Not to mention ratings shares from two different airings that are two years apart mean nothing. If you really want to do that, you have to compare same week. Even comparing shares in the same week doesnt consider time slot or anything.

You're really delusional if you don't think animation on TV is a bigger deal in Japan than in America.

Here are more recent ratings for Japan:
http://guyjin.me/2012/01/18/japanese-tv-ratings-jan-2-jan-8-2012/

Also note that the Anime in Japan ratings topic I linked to here at CR goes all the way back to 2008. If you think comparing the same week will make a significant difference, be my guest.

The delusion is that you think animation in Japan is so much more successful, when in fact in both countries, there are a handful of shows that garner significant ratings, while the remainder are clearly a niche market.


If you want a different perspective on how niche the bulk of anime is, go look up some of the highest figures for anime in Japan, and then compare them to something like this:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DC_Universe_Animated_Original_Movies#US_DVD_sales

Even when you account for Japan's population being only 41% of the U.S., I think you'll have a difficult time coming up with an OVA in the past 5 years that sold over 66,195 copies (41% of the lowest selling title on that list), much less 280,510 (41% of the highest).

I mentioned OVAs, as that as what these "movies" are closest too, since they never aired in a theater, and were direct to video with any TV airing coming only some time after release.

No doubt you'll claim the U.S. titles sold more because they were priced left. Unfortunately for that claim, attempts in the past to boost anime sales in Japan with lower prices didn't turn out so well.


Back to your other claim that Japanese have no interest in American animation, perhaps we should discuss sales of Disney anime and Pixar movies in Japan.


Wow, you really how no idea how the video market works in Japan.

As someone who's lived in Japan a good chunk of his life, I think I would have better familiarity of how things go there than a random guy on the internet. You can't compare home video sales because they're handled completely different in Japan. Especially when a lot of DVDs are 'rent only' from video stores, and their only sales stem from what video stores themselves buy. The market is not structured the same as in the west, and there's not as much of an importance as buying home video as there is in the west. Usually only otaku buy DVD/BD of shows, and the only movies generate millions of units sold, like Miyazaki flicks. Using those numbers to judge anything means nothing.

And please don't use Disney movies as an example of anything. The movie market is again, entirely different from the television market. Movies here in Japan are treated different than in America.

Though if you want to look at revenue.

http://yaraon.blog109.fc2.com/blog-entry-5012.html

This shows the total earnings for Bandai products and merchandise for the first half of 2012.

I'l go ahead and translate some of them for you.

Japanese
Mobile Suit Gundam: 20.5 Billion Yen
One Piece: 11.8 Billion Yen
Pretty Cure: 5.6 Billion Yen

American
Ben 10: 2.9 Billion Yen

Keep in mind Ben 10 sales are primarily American.. Japanese properties generate far more revenue and popularity than western franchises and animation does... the fact the biggest American cartoon pales in comparison to the weakest anime franchise says a lot.
The Wise Wizard
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Posted 6/16/12

Mertonan wrote:
You can't compare home video sales because they're handled completely different in Japan.

Apparently this conversation is pointless, as your time in Japan has made you the expert on how popular anime is in Japan, and facts and figures mean nothing since one "can't compare".

You even pulled out the "can't compare" claim on a top 10 list of Japanese programs, claiming first the list was too old (despite the fact that ratings for anime from the same period were available, as was a much newer list). You also claimed they would need to be for the same time slot, etc., despite that the purpose of ratings is to compare, and you had claimed "massive ratings" for anime.

Never mind that I have conversed with other people that have lived a "good chunk" of their life in Japan that differ with your opinion of how popular anime is there. Let's be honest. Except for the Bandai information, you have only offered claims and opinions, while throwing down the "can't compare" card on any facts and figures.



Japanese properties generate far more revenue and popularity than western franchises and animation does... the fact the biggest American cartoon pales in comparison to the weakest anime franchise says a lot.

So are we talking Japan only here or worldwide? If Japan only, I don't recall ever arguing that American animation was popular in Japan. That is only logical, since our animation is a bigger product here than anime.

If we are talking worldwide, and are apparently bringing merchandising into the mix, then consider this (otherwise you can skip this section, as it is not relevant):
http://www.licensemag.com/licensemag/data/articlestandard/licensemag/162010/664897/article.pdf
Cartoon Network Enterprises at #21. (Other U.S. companies that have a heavy inventory of animation-related products appear higher, but I consider those results to "polluted" to be valid.

Sanrio appears at #7. This is one of the few Japanese companies that appear on the list that could be considered as heavily animation-related.

The Pokemon Company International at #34.



Back on the original subject, if Japanese care nothing for American animation, why is Curious George typically in the top 12 rated anime?

Shaun the Sheep was another one that appeared in the upper portion of the anime rankings when it was shown.

No doubt you'll once again pull out the "can't compare" card somehow.

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