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Post Reply Books you MUST read
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Posted 8/12/12
Sorrow of War by Bao Ninh
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F / Sasebo, Nagasaki-shi
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Posted 8/12/12
Yeah, like I said.. I was never able to complete an episode. Mainly because of the guy you are talking about. His tonal inflection bothers the crap out of me. So does the fact that apparently humans can't do anything for themselves according to this dude. It's all a case of galactic intervention on the behalf of extraterrestrials.

Way to sell humans short there, buddy.

I think it's more disappointing that this is what passes for 'history' according to the History Channel. I wasn't aware that Bigfoot and alien technology had anything to do with history, yet there it is.. in between all the shows about Nazis.
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24 / M / Texas
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Posted 8/12/12 , edited 8/12/12
Ishmael. It's one of the most profound books I've ever read. I may disagree in my heart with a lot that is said but the book is full of keen observations about the human race. It's not a masterful work of literature from an imagination standpoint point but it's short, to the point, and it made me look at myself.

Other books I enjoyed were:

The World According to Garp
To Kill A Mocking Bird
The Life of Pi
The Catcher in the Rye (I feel like you have to read this when you're young and rebellious to enjoy it)
Harry Potter Series (to be a kid again )
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26 / M / Albany, Ny
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Posted 8/12/12
The Obsidian Chronicles (by Lawrence Watt Evans) 3 Book series. Starts with a dragon destroying an entire village and a boy being thrown into slavery.

Crown of Stars (by Kate Elliot) 7 Book Fantasy Epic filled with intrigue, battles, magic, and 6+ awesome story lines (2 main story paths). Makes me want to read it again.
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19 / F / Leaf village
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Posted 8/12/12
Scott Westerfeld and Haruki Murakami.
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25 / M / Bonne Lake, WA
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Posted 8/12/12
For Whom the Bell Tolls
The Three Musketeers
The Man in the Iron Mask
The Count of Monte Cristo
Metamorphosis
Lord of the Rings, all of them
The Hobbit
To Kill a Mocking Bird
Beowulf
The Invisible Man
The Giver



For Whom the Bell Tolls is just a great book. It's great insight into a part of history that you don't learn about in most cases, particularly in America.

The Three Musketeers, it's just really good to know the real story, and understand the intended politics behind the situation without all the Hollywood interpretation. Seriously, this is one of those stories that is really shredded by Hollywood, over and over again.
Read that before The Man in the Iron Mask. This book is a sequel to The Three Musketeers, essentially. Both books really show, I think, the origins of comic books in how the stories are written. Chapter to chapter is just very episodic. Actually, if my memory serves me right, it was actually publish as a weekly section in a news paper.

The Count of Monte Cristo is just as much fun, but with a much darker twist, as the hero is not nearly so noble, but that much more justified.

Metamorphosis... yeah. This story has kept me drug free for many years now.

Lord of the Rings, just classic. There is so much to the history as developed by Tolkien, from lore to language, it is very impressive. I've read the silmarillion and the lost tales as well. They read much more like a tale shared by verbal tradition, or maybe just in a much older language. It is the one of the last books to be written with so much emphasis on lineage. This old European historical feel is something I enjoyed a great deal.

The Hobbit is written down separately because it is written so much as a personal narrative rather than as a historical note. But I suppose that that is the beauty of these novels, that they were all written from the perspective of the characters in the books writing the tales down.

To Kill a Mocking Bird had characters that I respected. I liked the thought processes of the children, and how the father responds to them.

Beowulf, cause it's fun to read in old english.

The Invisible Man was a shocking book to me. I read it not knowing anything about it. and the ending was so stunning that I actually went through the book trying to contradict it.

Lastly, The Giver will always have a special spot for me. You should never forget.

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35 / New York
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Posted 8/12/12

CanesGalactica wrote:

Yeah, like I said.. I was never able to complete an episode. Mainly because of the guy you are talking about. His tonal inflection bothers the crap out of me. So does the fact that apparently humans can't do anything for themselves according to this dude. It's all a case of galactic intervention on the behalf of extraterrestrials.

Way to sell humans short there, buddy.

I think it's more disappointing that this is what passes for 'history' according to the History Channel. I wasn't aware that Bigfoot and alien technology had anything to do with history, yet there it is.. in between all the shows about Nazis.


Honestly, when you say that, it makes me try to imagine a world where the population wasn't brainwashed by supernatural fiction (theology). And therefore already primed to accept the most ridiculous nonsense imaginable.

But, you do point out a very serious problem. People don't respect knowledge. They never have.

If you compare the world's population, to the number of PhDs, it's not even one percent. Compared to PhDs in science, it's even less. And going back in time, that ratio remains the same. Yet that teeny-tiny fraction of nothing accounts for all of the progress mankind ever has, or ever will, achieve.

Regardless of the vast sea of sophomores, we have managed to drag our barbaric world of delusional, witch burning, superstitious, crucifying, child sacrificing, holy book thumping cavemen, kicking and screaming into the 21st century. From my perspective: It doesn't matter if they continue to delude themselves. Their relative level of misinformation is as irrelevant as their place in history.
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Posted 8/12/12
Damn i've read so many books, the library was my favorite place growing up. Now I'm trying to put together a collection of books by Puerto Rican authors, it's hard since a lot of them are out of print.

Some of my favorites:
Spidertown by Abraham Rodriguez. It's the story of a 17 year old drug runner who decides to leave the drug game because he falls for a girl. It sounds cliche, but it's pretty raw, the author doesn't hold back on the sex and violence involved in that life, he really looks into the self delusion that goes into living that life.

Carlito's Way and After Hours by Edwin Torres. Kinda the same premise as Spidertown a getting out of the life book. Carlito's Way is all about the life and After Hours is an older Carlito trying to leave it behind. The interesting part about this book is the language, the whole thing is told in firstperson, it is all just Carlito's continous train of thought, told in slang. The only other book i've read that uses the same style is A Clockwork Orange, also a good read.

El Ingenios Hildalgo Don Quijote De La Mancha by Cervantes. I have read this book 3 times in English and am currently reading it in Spanish, not really astonishing i've read some books i own over six times, but the fact that a 1,000 + page book can feel like such a light read and that you really don't want it to finish says how good it is. It's the greatest buddy comedy ever.

Tess Of the Durbervilles by Thomas Hardy. Back in High School we read Whuthering Heights, Jane Eyre, and Tess. I can't tell a single thing about Whuthering Heights and Jane Eyre, but Tess made such an impression that I read every novel by Thomas Hardy. Tess is the story of Tess, a village girl who gets raped by a rich asshole and then has to try and overcome it in a society that views her as culpable or at the very least as stupid for not marrying the guy. The author said he wrote the novel, because in a lot of classical liturature when a women is raped she simply commits suicide, he wanted to show that in the real world women usual live on.

Jude the Obscure by Thomas Hardy. At the time Hardy wrote it the critics called it Jude the Obscene and were such assholes that Hardy never wrote another novel. It is the story of Jude, who is full of ambition and wants to be great, but doesn't have the drive or focus. He ends up failing because he can't stay away from women. It also has a pretty modern approch to marrige and gender roles.

Thus Spoke Zarathustra and Beyond Good and Evil by Nietzsche. Books on Philosophy Nietzsche said that they were the same book told in different ways. The books put forward Nietzsche belief in a philosophy beyond good and evil that goes beyond the slave morality that he saw present in Christian moral teaching.

Sorry for the long post, but since some of my choices aren't well known i thought i'd give descriptions in case anyone wanted to read them.
phanAn 
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61 / F / OP,FL
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Posted 8/12/12
reading is fundamental!

I've read so many books in my lifetime that One is not enough.
there are so many I liked and many that never made it mainstream but were worth a second read.

I read one about 20 years ago, It was written in the 50's about a singular moment( tuesday 2;00pm)
space and time split and all women went to one dimention and all males to the other. It went on to tell how
men and women dealt with world and living. Needless to say the men killed each other and blew large portions
of the planet to hell while the women dealt with learning new trades that only men had firemen ,doctors, laborers
etc.And one man's love for his wife and child corrected the world.

I have no idea of the title or author but damn it was a very compeling, thought provoking tale
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Posted 8/12/12
The Wheel of Time series by Robert Jordan, fantastic lotr style book. Better then LOTR and lengthier too.
phanAn 
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61 / F / OP,FL
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Posted 8/12/12
...and then there's Historical Romance.. Sandra Hill

you laugh . you ooooh, you get a liitle titalated and smile
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F / Sasebo, Nagasaki-shi
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Posted 8/12/12
I think this is most of the reason that outside of having a membership here and occasionally watching a few other series in other places, I stay away from television. There appears to be nothing of remarkable interest or benefit there, so why bother?

This probably also explains that while I do love a good fiction novel, I prefer non-fiction works written by fairly intelligent authors, regardless of the subject matter.

There is just so much in this world to learn and absorb and I only know a tiny fraction of it. I want to know more. I enjoy being a repository for useless novel.
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F / Sasebo, Nagasaki-shi
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Posted 8/12/12
Oh good lord.. I'll be reading this series forever. Does the series get better or worse once his son picked up writing the series?
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25 / F / CA
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Posted 8/12/12
Fiction:
Einstein's Dreams by Alan Lightman (a short but, in my opinion, beautiful book)
Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer

Nonfiction (which has been my latest streak):
Pale Blue Dot by Carl Sagan
A Year of Magical Thinking by Joan Didion
Into Thin Air by Jon Krakauer
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F / Dreamsicle
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Posted 8/13/12


My suggestions included:

"Slaughterhouse Five" - Kurt Vonnegu (too, I really like this book)
"The Kite Runner"-Khaled Hosseini
"Hiroshima"-John Hersey
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