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Voice actors against fansubs?
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Posted 7/9/12

Fistacon wrote:


rikku456 wrote:

If Funimation would let Australians use their site, I wouldn't have to use fan subs.


madman.com.au has ALOT of free eps on their site

(**Madman is an anime distribution company in Australia**)



I use that site, but sadly its missing a lot that Funimation has
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Posted 7/9/12
Well I fansub and I appreciate fansubs and here's why.

I would've never been this interested in anime without the free anime on the internet.
I'd like to buy DVDs in Japan. Too bad they don't play in the U.S.
I buy merchandise. And I go to Anime Expo, etc.
I buy lots and lots of manga.
If I like a series enough, I will purchase DVDs.
I buy anime DVDs as gifts for other people.
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Posted 7/10/12

TheRealEscargotpudding wrote:

Well I fansub and I appreciate fansubs and here's why.

I would've never been this interested in anime without the free anime on the internet.
I'd like to buy DVDs in Japan. Too bad they don't play in the U.S.
I buy merchandise. And I go to Anime Expo, etc.
I buy lots and lots of manga.
If I like a series enough, I will purchase DVDs.
I buy anime DVDs as gifts for other people.


I think many of us do the same thing. The people complaining about how fansubs are bad are probably the ones that don't do these things.

====

Personally, if the person is going to buy at all, they'll buy it even if they've seen the fansubs. If they won't buy it, then at least they'll probably advertise it if they like it.

In a sense, that is what fansubbing is. It is just another form of advertisements-except not officially endorsed by the companies.

Personally, my thing is that people who do the fansubbing probably like the anime that they are subbing and probably want people to buy it once it comes out (if it comes out).

I will say this much. Without illegitimate means of viewing stuff, I would be tens of thousands of dollars richer simply because I'd have saved my money instead of spending it. Possibly hundreds of thousands by now.

I have a habit of buying 3-4 of anything I like. And yes, I watched Lucky Star-even bought the limited edition box sets. Konata is very similar to me though we do have differences (for one, my hair is black and for two, I live in America).

--

Also, in my opinion, a lot of fansubbed anime is better than the official subs. I've seen fansubs that are better in video or sound quality, that are better in subbing quality, and rare ones that are both. Doesn't mean I won't buy the official stuff, but I'll keep watching the unofficial stuff even after I do.


Also, there is the issue of series (not just anime) where the license holder ships out maybe 1-2 dvds... then stops the series altogether. And then you have months or years where there are no subs for the anime until some random group decides that enough is enough and subs it.
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Posted 7/10/12
You mean like how Hellsing Ultimate's English releases were dead for what is it about 4+ years now?

Anyway on that note, the Hellsing OVA has been picked up by FUNimation as it turns out and they'll begin by re-releasing the first 4 DVDs before they get to those that were never released due to that other distributor going bankrupt. I've not had a problem finding stuff subbed, though.
The Wise Wizard
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Posted 7/10/12

TheRealEscargotpudding wrote:
I'd like to buy DVDs in Japan. Too bad they don't play in the U.S.

So I assume you buy Blu-ray discs from Japan, correct? (Japan and the U.S. share the same region for Blu-ray).




sinnoaria wrote:
Personally, if the person is going to buy at all, they'll buy it even if they've seen the fansubs. If they won't buy it, then at least they'll probably advertise it if they like it.

In a sense, that is what fansubbing is. It is just another form of advertisements-except not officially endorsed by the companies.

There a lot a lot of people out there that have a hard drive stuffed with anime they have downloaded, at least some of which they would likely purchased if they couldn't download it.

As to the "advertisement" aspect, that has long been one of the arguments of those that support fansubs. When it comes to anime that there is a legal stream for, however, that argument falls flat. The legal stream performs the same function, while also returning a bit of revenue to the producer.


I will say this much. Without illegitimate means of viewing stuff, I would be tens of thousands of dollars richer simply because I'd have saved my money instead of spending it. Possibly hundreds of thousands by now.

Unless you have a job where you make a ton of money every year, you are clearly exaggerating there. Unless your listed age is incorrect, even assuming you started working when you were 16, "hundreds of thousands" would mean at minimum you had spent over $28,500 per year, or an average of over $548 per week on anime.


Also, there is the issue of series (not just anime) where the license holder ships out maybe 1-2 dvds... then stops the series altogether. And then you have months or years where there are no subs for the anime until some random group decides that enough is enough and subs it.

Given that few companies release anime as singles any more, about the only time you'll encounter that problem any more is when the distributor is working on a long running series that normally would not be covered by one or two box sets.

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Posted 7/10/12
All I am seeing is people justifying breaking the law and hurting the industry by saying it is because they can't afford anime. That is absolutly no excuse. Need I remind you all how much it cost to create an anime(from hundreds of thousands for short series to millions of dollars for longer series). The cost of making it is pretty high. Take into account the amount a non-Japanese company has to pay to license it in another language. Think about that and decide if your free watching of anime is fair and also include the cost you pay for an anime to the cost companies pay to license it. I'd say $100 for the entire series of Clannad is pretty damn fair.

FUNimation is the most outspoken US licensing company in terms of their anti-fansub/anti-illegal upload thing goes. You folks cannot justify doing something illegal and hurtful. If language is an issue, LEARN JAPANESE! You aren't going to get free shit for the rest of your life so stop trying to find free ways out of things and do something to HELP the industry and not contribute to the violations of their copyrights. If you watch anime/manga online illegally(like on JustDubs/mangafox), you are what true otaku hate. You know it, I know it, the Crunchyroll staff knows it.

That's all I have to say.
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47 / M / Covington, KY
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Posted 7/10/12
A lot of anime and manga are not available at all through "official" sources. As long as that is true, fans will use unofficial sources. Companies that dub anime and translate manga should pay attention to what is popular there, and they will learn what to acquire the rights to next. They'll do a lot better that way than bellyaching about "piracy".
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Posted 7/10/12

Otaku2012 wrote:

All I am seeing is people justifying breaking the law and hurting the industry by saying it is because they can't afford anime. That is absolutly no excuse. Need I remind you all how much it cost to create an anime(from hundreds of thousands for short series to millions of dollars for longer series). The cost of making it is pretty high. Take into account the amount a non-Japanese company has to pay to license it in another language. Think about that and decide if your free watching of anime is fair and also include the cost you pay for an anime to the cost companies pay to license it. I'd say $100 for the entire series of Clannad is pretty damn fair.

FUNimation is the most outspoken US licensing company in terms of their anti-fansub/anti-illegal upload thing goes. You folks cannot justify doing something illegal and hurtful. If language is an issue, LEARN JAPANESE! You aren't going to get free shit for the rest of your life so stop trying to find free ways out of things and do something to HELP the industry and not contribute to the violations of their copyrights. If you watch anime/manga online illegally(like on JustDubs/mangafox), you are what true otaku hate. You know it, I know it, the Crunchyroll staff knows it.

That's all I have to say.


The industry is already crap or did you not read my post regarding to Dai Sato's feelings about its current state? You are not supporting the animators and creative development just the distributor and the company as a whole. The creative development is cut out of the picture the second they complete the work which is pre-airing. Besides, raging at people is just going to rile them up and make the hostility worse. Raging is a half-assed excuse, you either clean up the mess or ignore it.
Also just so you know, law does not equate to justice. Just something to think about on top of the fact you should be more concerned with fighting for better treatment for the developing staffs. Sadly that is the nature of the internet, distributors are behind the curve, human impulse will have them pirate and turn to alternative sources to get what they want. Crunchyroll started out the same way, there used to be huge amounts of problems with Crunchyroll illegally streaming anime. As it got more popular and larger, this site, however, gained recognition and began complying with the wishes of the distributors who had the regional licenses to said anime.

Today, Crunchyroll is an official anime streaming website only offering anime they have been given permission to use. Mangafox is a hellhole, it can't even be considered in the same league as Crunchyroll, besides it is Mangafox's sister website that provides the anime streaming. I got banned on their site once because I brought up on how hypocritical they were to brazenly violate the copyright law, but at the same time act like they were complying with it.
FUNimation and Bandai are major distributors of anime in the U.S. but they still are playing catch-up. With the internet, information is all over the world within hours, minutes for those dedicated enough to get it out there. I barely was able to stream from FUNimation's website because they had so many server stability issues and errors. Essentially that alone rendered their content unwatchable. I'm not sure if this problem is still prevalent seeing as I actually managed to stream some anime without any errors as of late.

Back to human impulse, if the licensed distributors can't keep up with demand that impulse will cause people to find those alternate sources. Whether you like it or not, that is what happens and it something they are failing to handle. Fansubs are available with hours, with the official versions being unavailable for another week, sometimes even months. Jittery people are not going to resist, we've all done it, and I'm certain you had to at some point as well. When the distributors fail to meet the demands of their global audiences in a timely manner, fansubs are all the craze.
Sure, it will be more costly to get those subs done and streaming effectively, but what costs more? The investment to pump out subbed anime quicker may come at a cost, but to sit around and do nothing to get ahead of them, your just encouraging and doing little to discourage their existence. I do, however, take that comment about learning the language very bitterly.

You think I'd be sitting on my ass right now if I had such an opportunity? Many of you might have more opportunities to learn the language, but as it stands I have no opportunities to take lessons. I'd have to leave the damn state just to find one that offered Japanese language courses. In order to make such a move and take those classes, I'd be in debt which is not an option. Potentially risking my financial stability for the possibility is not in my best interests.
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Posted 7/10/12 , edited 7/10/12
Not an exaggeration. I said tens of thousands and POSSIBLY hundreds of thousands. In other words, the money I spent on anime, if I had invested it instead of spending it, would likely have gotten me more money, and with that money, I could continue to invest. Instead, I decided to support the anime and game companies that I liked. And yes, at one point, I did spend about 1,000 or more a month on anime, manga, and related items.


And didn't I already say that most of those people probably would not have bought anyways? Sure, some may have bought but didn't, but some would not have bought, but did. I won't argue that it doesn't make a perfect equal, but whether it is a gain or a loss is arguable. But without serious experimentation, there is no way to really tell for sure.


I for one generally don't buy from companies that have a serious issue against such matters. Not only as a manner of principal-usually those companies don't have anime I want anyways. (*points at funimation. Not much there I particularly like. There are some, but not many.*). That isn't to say I won't watch any "free" anime they have (like funimation's online episodes), but generally I won't buy their stuff. There are many other reasons for that. Often the fansubs they hit are also the ones that I prefer. As I mentioned before, I often prefer the fansubs over the official subs even though I'll buy the official stuff. I should also mention that as I mentioned earlier, I like knowing what I'm buying-if I don't know enough, I usually won't buy.


And yes, Izul, that is the kind of stuff I'm talking about. When a company (for whatever reason) drops a series mid-season. Issue is that it still happens from time to time. And it is definitely worse with multi-season series.


As I mentioned before, the people complaining about how fansubs are bad are probably the ones that don't buy the anime and thus think others are the same way.
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from the South Bay
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Posted 7/11/12
The industry has to be more creative nowadays and should not only rely of DVD or BluRay Media to increase their profit margin.

THe internet has made things fast and competetive. If you are not on the ball, you will be behind.

Before Chrunchyroll Niconico and Viz Anime , it was only thru the fansub that I learn about really good anime that I eventually collect the official media copy.I have to slow down though or else I wont have space to store them ha ha ha.
Anyway there so many pirated stuff being sold on Ebay and I dont even look at those, even though they are cheap as hell.
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Posted 7/11/12

sinnoaria wrote:

Not an exaggeration. I said tens of thousands and POSSIBLY hundreds of thousands. In other words, the money I spent on anime, if I had invested it instead of spending it, would likely have gotten me more money, and with that money, I could continue to invest. Instead, I decided to support the anime and game companies that I liked. And yes, at one point, I did spend about 1,000 or more a month on anime, manga, and related items.


You have my intrigment as to the size of your collection. I know the size of mine- anime section that dwarfs Suncoast, manga to make Borders seem empty, artbooks and doujinshi to seem like I'm a reseller, and most of the domestic anime CD catalog, plus imports. Add in to this some merchandise, t-shirts, doujinshi, etc... And I might, only might, barely hit 6 digits. You're notably younger than I, which is why I'm curious.


I for one generally don't buy from companies that have a serious issue against such matters. Not only as a manner of principal-usually those companies don't have anime I want anyways. (*points at funimation. Not much there I particularly like. There are some, but not many.*). That isn't to say I won't watch any "free" anime they have (like funimation's online episodes), but generally I won't buy their stuff


Actually, this line kinda confirms you're nowhere near 6 digits. I understand boycotting companies that have policies you don't like (I avoid most Dark Horse stuff for a reason.), but to stick to not buying anything from the biggest anime company of the past 5 years...

Now, the rest of the thread. This won't necessarily be directed at you, but I'm going to attach it on now:

DUBS: Whoever thinks a majority of people don't like dubs are wrong. Since the early days (which I will cede did not have many well-made dubs), dubbed items have always outsold subbed. Some would attribute it to the dubbed VHS being cheaper, leading to the 90/10 ratios of sales on some series. But even removing cost, CPM stated way back when that for Slayers (where both dub and sub VHS were $20 each), that the dubbed tapes outsold the subbed ones by more than 2 to 1. Dubs sell, period. Bring us to today- we're in more of a collector market. Fewer things are getting dubbed. But if it was because fans didn't care, why are we dubbing anything anymore? The bubble is gone, sales of some series do not get high enough to fund the cost of the dub. But some series, initially released sub only on DVD, are seeing bi-lingual re-releases. And this is done by a combination of good sales AND FAN REQUESTS. Sentai has been dubbing more of their titles than they were last year. FUNimation has said they plan on dubbing everything they do. Why? It still helps sales- even to the fans.

Not to mention, if you really want exposure, a channel like Cartoon Network is great. But they'll only show dubs. Until recently, with The Anime Network and FUNimation Channel, almost everything on TV was dubbed. You might see a "special" subbed showing, but even those were exceptions, not norms, and they would also have less preferential time slots in contrast to the dub. Selling ad time on a sub release is significantly harder, because of the known fact that dubs are what sell.

HELPING: Sure, fansubs helped the industry... in the 80s and early 90s. Let's actually look at these roots. Fansubbing in these days was mail-order VHS. And for some groups, you already had to have an in just to be able to order! Yes, fansubs were sold- at cost, plus shipping. When a title was licensed, it was pulled- fansubs were no longer availiable for it. The companies could see what was popular, and go after it. It let them found a baseline for what to get. But time goes on, and companies started to get ideas of what would sell, even if a fansubber didn't do it.

Then the digital fansub appeared. Again, they were underground- you had to know the workings of IRC or a private URL to get the titles. And again, they were pulled upon license. People's egos then got in the way. They wanted to be more known. They wanted to be that group who finished a series. (Example: X TV. There were rumors circulating that the series was going to be licensed near the end of its run in Japan. Groups scrambled to get the last episode out; only 1 officially did before the license, and then had the gall to brag about beating the announcement.) It had become more about self-serving than promotion. People in "legit" group A also were in group B, continuing to work on series after they were announced.

Enter BitTorrent. Now any monkey can download anime, and there's no way to remove titles which are licensed anymore. But the groups didn't care, it kept their name out there! The desire for personal ego stroking meant that groups went after titles that were popular and certain to be licensed- instead of the original goal of promoting anime. Prelicensed and co-produced series didn't matter anymore. Everything became fair game, because they valued their ego more than the company, and enjoyed "sticking the man." And that is the culture that exists today in fansubs. And it's bred a whole new problem...

"FREE" ANIME: "But people in Japan get to watch it for free!" Well... no. They pay in time- the ad sponsors pay for them watching it. It's akin to the free accounts here. Sure, financially, it's "free", but you give up some extra time- that is your price. Plus, a lot of the popular shows over here air at weird times in Japan. You want to stay up until 1:30 AM local time on a Wednesday to watch a show? There might even be another one airing at the same time! They still have to choose over there!

Things outside of Japan have gotten much better for previewing anime. We have more options than ever before, from sites like CR, to licensed YouTube showings, to some older demo sampler disks still floating around out there. And if you do like something, the prices have gotten better! We are not "owed" anything; if you really want to see something that's not coming out over here, it's on you to learn Japanese and either find a TV provider offering the channel airing the show, find a Japanese company streaming it, or wait and buy the DVD or Blu-Ray. (As noted already in this thread, if regions are a concern, Japan and the US are both BR region A.) A company not bringing it over does NOT mean you can steal it.

SUPPORT: An official licensee pays a license fee AND royalties for each copy sold (or, for streaming, viewed) to the licensor in Japan. Some of the money is obviously kept locally by the company, to pay their costs and have some profits. The amount sent to the licensor will vary from series to series, based on the contract. So where does this money to Japan go? Well, most titles go to the production studio. While individual animators do not get royalties, the studio will keep a cut, as revenue for bringing the team together and making the idea happen. Based on their contract, a percentage will also go to the original idea creator, usually the series author for most anime, for having the idea to begin with. This allows the author to be financially supported to create more series, and the production studio (which employs said animators) to continue adapting ideas to anime.

Fansubs, on the other hand, contribute next to, if not actually, nothing. Some fansub groups may buy a set to do DVD/BR quality fansubs, but this is the full extent to any support shown. It is known that not every person who downloads a fansub would actually buy a copy, but the collapse of markets before the bubble burst was seen due to fansubs. Some Japanese companies have cited losses of up to 50% of domestic sales and 90% of sales to eastern Asia as a result of fansub availiability. Fansubs are also cited for killing the "B" title in the American market. A huge title, like Naruto, will sell. But a lesser-known title that may have sounded interesting instead becomes a download. It is also known that most downloads do not convert to sales; the lost sales from people stealing it is far greater than the increased number of people becoming interested in a copy. (In America's heyday, the .Hack//Sign v1 w/ box, limited to 15,000 copies, is still a sought after collectible. A decent selling title today will move about 2000 copies. If the reverse were true, that 15K number would be sustained.) What about the people who buy the merchandise? Well, if the series is seen to perform poor enough as a series, there won't be merchandise for it. And this means that to support a series, all that's left is the media release... which has been cannibalized by people who think anime is owed to them for free on a silver platter.

Finally, in act of full disclosure: I've been in fansubbing groups; I've even co-founded 2 of them. (Both are now defunct.) I liked doing the small stuff. (To date, anything I've done work on has not been licensed, either. Shame, too, because I'd love to see more Atashin'chi.) I've seen what goes on behind the screen, the politics, the ego stroking, etc. And I can say that fansubbers who truly care about the industry are pretty much extinct. Don't get me started on the ones who've actively opposed official C&D notifications, also. (I'm aware of 2, neither of those groups are still around either.) I think that fansubs going mainstream is the worst thing that could have happened for this industry. It's really not a case of the company adapting anymore- when you competition is fast and free, offering only quality is a tough sale. And before you say something stupid like "release it faster", remember there are still things called contracts. I can safely say that CR negotiates theirs well before we see the title mentioned here. Some media releases even have stipulations for when they can release the product. (Japan has this fear of reverse importation.)
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Posted 7/11/12
A large company does not mean it has good quality.

Look at EA, largest video game publisher in the world, but also the greediest. Just go any local retailer with video games, and you'll see the number of titles for EA easily eclipse any other publisher/developer. It wouldn't be so bad if they made one complete game without being bugged to death.
Remind me when globally there were only subbed anime? Perhaps official streams and many distributors have since taken to permitting us the feature, but dubs are largely watched since there was little available alternative. Many people are honestly lazy, they won't want to read when they watch something. It has a lot less to do with the quality of the voice acting and more with the accessibility of dubs over RAW with subs. Many casual viewers are not going to go out of their way to find subbed content, and it did have its perks.

Toonami wouldn't have been such a hit had this not been the case. Although largely that had been the result of the internet still trying to make something of itself. Dubs aren't all that bad, but you have to admit the quality of the RAW trumps the dub quality quite a bit especially when dubs usually get edited/censored frequently. Obviously it is a problem, but as I mentioned the distributors are having to keep with a digital era and they just are not staying on top of things. The most important thing in my post was "human impulse" that is not going to fade away, so FUNimation and other distributors just need to trump them.
You got to snuff out the fansubs by making access to the licensed content just as quicker if not quicker. 9 out of 10 people will prefer to stream the official version over a crappy fansub solely for the fact the video and audio quality being superior. If FUNimation so much as subbed and added the latest episodes of the licensed anime on their website for streaming the same day or the day after the first airings on Japanese television broadcasts, fansubs simply would lose much of their edge.

Honestly, I don't know anyone that would prefer fansubs over the official versions. Despite the overall improvement of quality, they are still piss poor compared to licensed streams and DvD/Blue-Ray releases. We can all play a part in reducing dependence on fansubs, but seeing as we are not tasked with such, we are of little importance in the long run. It seems like it would be simple enough to just get the subbing done and released to coincide with its airing. All the anime broadcasts are finished well ahead of time, such just use the time prior to this to get them subbed, it also would make distribution swifter.
When you can cut out the time required to go back and sub content, it means you get to the dubbing swifter. When the dubbing gets pushed ahead that much faster, it means earlier releases in other regions. Overall it would just dismantle fansub websites in no time flat. Then this problem wouldn't be so harmful to the distributors or the studios who developed it.

That is still a problem, a blatant one at that. It is essentially what I said before, only the top brass will profit. The writers who make major contributions in bringing the vision to life, the animators, character designers, seiyuu, etc. are still receiving no such royalties. Considering how much work they must also put into various anime projects, you'd think they'd at least get some minuscule royalties. The studio benefits and the top brass, but that does not mean the rest of the staffs employed by the studio will or that their futures with the studio are secured.
Just as a note, the amount of people streaming fansubs far exceeds those that download them. Besides, since fansubs have gone digital, who buys them anymore? Although I believe your post to be the most worthwhile in this entire thread dunno001, it is still futile. For instance, neither of us works for FUNimation, therefore we have no sway as to push forward an idea to cut fansubbing. With that reduction in fansubbing, that would result in an increase of sales and merchandise will likely be made available.

A great deal of merchandise already exists anyway in Japan. If it is profitable then that merchandise may be distributed elsewhere. Distributors still are failing to step up despite their discontent. Going after popular fansubbing groups won't do you much good as your not confronting the real problem. In order to stamp them out, you'll need to keep pace with the fansubs going up then they'll be less popular since the official version will match the fansubs in releases to the global audience.
No one is denying fansubbing is a problem, only that the industry is suffering from other ailments and the lack of action on the distributors behalf to stunt the growth and continued dominance of fansubs. It is not unreasonable to ask for distributors to provide subs faster. FUNimation in particular dropped the ball when their website was plagued with all those server errors preventing any official streaming. When a studio chooses a distributing company, their negotiations should be occurring and near completion before the Japanese airing.

This will allow the paperwork to be gotten out of the way and the actual subbing to get underway. That is the leading reason why people turn to fansubs. Both studio and distributor must work out the fine details for the future of the property beforehand. If negotiations are not done by the time the announcement of a new anime storms the web, begin preparation before that information is leaked. Furthermore, announcements can be delayed in order for this to be done prior to airing.
Is it that simple, hell no. But, you must evolve and adapt to new methods of pirating in order to reduce the overall success of pirated content. You'll never abolish pirating, "Where there is a will, there is a way." However, this is a problem across the entire entertainment industry and beyond. Companies need to keep ahead of the pack or at least keep up with the illegal sources in order to decimate their followings.

I do not disagree with what you've said, only that the studios and their distributors need to more actively take an interest in their foreign audiences. Failure to do so results in fansubs springing up to appease the ravenous masses. I'm seeing discontent all around, fansubs suck, I hate the abysmal quality. However, every creature will choose having something over nothing. But, were is the action to properly handle these problems?
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Posted 7/11/12
I am not as hostile but I understand OP's point. Fansub probably do cost the industry money usually because they are illegally uploaded, but many of the anime I watched came from fansubs...I am now a lifelong fan. That is a gain to the industry. If the companies are complaining then they should make them available to us quickly and in an affordable fashion. Crunchyroll seems to do that...we need more of that. I mean im a premium member and pay for this service. it is great. And thus i support the companies.
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Posted 7/11/12 , edited 7/11/12
I would not be watching anime today without fansubs. I probably pay for the right to watch half of what i watch now, the other half is either not available or not available in a way i could afford. Right now i'm at about $35 per month for the habit and i have to keep it there or lower.

Edit: I should also note that there are many fansubs that are superior to official subs. Many official subs neglect to translate signage and reading material leaving us to guess what they say.
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Posted 7/13/12 , edited 7/13/12
Without fansubbers, we wouldn't be here today on CR talking about it and watching anime right now.
As much as it hurts to admit it, fansubbed anime paved the road for all of us to like, watch, and enjoy anime as a form of media entertainment.
Even now, American licencing companies choose a very few each season and dubs it. Now, I don't really mind much for dubs these days due to voice actors getting better at what they do, and more training to convey emotions like Japanese voice actors who practices and goes to schools for.

FUNimation are always complaining about pirates and fansubbers about how we're hurting the industry. That's not entirely true. They're thinking like a corporations do. Movies, Music, Games industry always complain about pirates and look at the charts right now: the sales are soaring higher than they ever did. Mostly due to the Online streaming and newer methods of distributing digital contents. That's the OLD method of media distribution. People nowadays want faster, and convenient services.

Crunchyroll had it right to introduce pain-free way to stream anime DIRECTLY from Japan, without all that waiting period.
Just look at Crunchyroll's premium members. There are so many of us paying for the service BECAUSE it works, and it's CONVENIENT.

People pay for convenience. People don't care for dubs. People want what's hot right now. And Crunchyroll delivers that.
Now only that, as a paying member, I no longer feel the guilt deep down in my heart at pirating anime.
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