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Is it hard for an American to find work in Japan?
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33 / M / Staten Island, NY...
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Posted 8/9/12

Otaku2012 wrote:

Short answer: Not if you have the qualifications. It's not like many employers discriminate anyway, so you won't have to worry about that.


In addition to my IT job, I'm teaching night courses at two different colleges in the Fall semester (one private university and one city technology college).

I dream of one day teaching a college course in Japan. I really plan on clamping down, studying the language. The goal is to eventually pass the N2 JLPT exam in a few years. That should give me the language skills to lecture, write notes and exams, read papers/projects, and grade assignments.

I already have 13 years of IT experience, MS Degree, and experience teaching college courses. I've been toying with the idea of a Ph.D, but not sure if it is something I want to go through at this point in my life. I rather use my time to learn languages and make extra money teach courses.

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33 / M / Staten Island, NY...
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Posted 8/9/12

Whisky51 wrote:

Well Actually the majority understand English but they tend to avoid using it :)

In the works place i am, half of the office is japanese and 80% have a very good english.

Then for sure when you go traveling, offices are not the kind of place you tend to go :)

In restaurants and sight seeing place it is true this become more difficult to find someone who do speak english. Therefore they would understand most of the time but stay away from answering/using it. Not that they are rude but, are more afraid to not use it correctly.

Jobwise, it is true that Language teacher and mostly english ones are the most popular way to find a job in japan. Therefore in areas such as technology, fashion and finance it is possible to find jobs.

On the other hands on these jobs it is very likely that the employer Foreign or Japanese will ask the candidate to have a proficiency in the language.

In most of recuitments ads you can find on Job sites such as Michael page, Robert walters and some others, they would require quite a high level in japanese though such as a JLPT2 to JLPT1 which is nearly native to native.

For some positions they are justified but, for some others they are not and actually if you don't get discouraged by the level requested you can still find a compromise with recruiters/employers to lower their expectations.

Again in some positions it is asked but not required so you should not stop to that detail when job hunting.

I currently have a JLPT4 and this was way below expectations. My current level doesn't allow me to use enough correct "business" japanese to use it day to day in the office and thus i use english most of the time.

Last but not least if you are determined to find a job in japan this will probably be a long process and you will probably face of lot hickups.
At least most of us had (not trying to be to generalist here) but, if you don't give up that could pay off.

Cheers





Suicidalducky wrote:

You could work in japan by join a U.S government agency that has need for people in Japan (and your skillsets)..if they have offices there. The government will pay for your lodging (pretty good amount)..I considered volunteering but 3-4 years (requirement stay) is way too long for me, nor do I have a good command of the language.

And no I'm not talking about the military, but as a civilian employee.

But sounds like you want to join a Japanese company, so maybe this isn't' a great option =P





Kuro_Kiri wrote:


Suicidalducky wrote:

You could work in japan by join a U.S government agency that has need for people in Japan (and your skillsets)..if they have offices there. The government will pay for your lodging (pretty good amount)..I considered volunteering but 3-4 years (requirement stay) is way too long for me, nor do I have a good command of the language.

And no I'm not talking about the military, but as a civilian employee.

But sounds like you want to join a Japanese company, so maybe this isn't' a great option =P


The only thing I could think of is work for the US Foreign Service and that requires provable fluency.


Thanks guys.

I am probably able to easily land a US government job, with my credentials, and also from a few years ago I was highly encouraged to apply to civilian government positions by them. I unfortunately didn't, but it wasn't all for the worse. I did earn a MS Degree, and continued gaining experience. I also now teach computer science courses at different colleges during the evenings. So, I did gain a lot (of everything but money) by not applying.

I see myself working in a university setting. I am very very used to having a career in higher ed.
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26 / F / UK/Japan
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Posted 9/5/12
pornstar is easy job lol
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29 / F / Kumamoto, Japan
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Posted 9/5/12

OyOsama wrote:

pornstar is easy job lol


Good luck getting sponsored a VISA for that job.
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26 / F / UK/Japan
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Posted 9/5/12

Kerensa wrote:


OyOsama wrote:

pornstar is easy job lol


Good luck getting sponsored a VISA for that job.


A company will sponsor the person I think, most of Japan is run by yakuza already, especially centraly
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29 / F / Kumamoto, Japan
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Posted 9/5/12

OyOsama wrote:


Kerensa wrote:


OyOsama wrote:

pornstar is easy job lol


Good luck getting sponsored a VISA for that job.


A company will sponsor the person I think, most of Japan is run by yakuza already, especially centraly


To get sponsored a VISA you must have at least a Bachelor's degree from any legal school. A lot of companies are rather hesitant to offer sponsors to foreigners because they're pretty keen on keeping the workforce in the country. At least here in Kyushu, if you aren't teaching English most companies cannot sponsor you (in fact, there are schools that refuse to sponsor you a VISA... not really sure how they expect to hire someone without sponsoring them...).

On top of that, if you want to work out of the English teaching zone you have to pretty much prove you can do the job better than any Japanese person and I'm sure language will probably play a role in the whole thing too because no one wants to be too responsible for someone (e.g. finding an apartment, setting up the gas and electric and/or water, helping you with bills, etc).

To get a "green card" you have to have spent at least up to 7-10 years in Japan consecutively without spending any other time living in any other country. But there is always marriage, but be prepared for random visits, requests to see images and love letters, etc, to prove that your love is real and that you're not just abusing the system.

And then there's always illegal work! But you have to leave the country after 3 months and return. But apparently now if you do it three times in a row you get kicked out for an x amount of time (my coworker had it happen to him).

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26 / M
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Posted 9/9/12
Depends on what you want to do.If you want to teach English and you are under forty, lots of opportunities, very little Japanese skills required. If you want to do anything else, you need have a high level of Japanese, and need to be really good at whatever else you want to do.
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33 / F / North Pole
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Posted 9/13/12
From personal experience, here's my 2 cents:

* Be sure to be fluent in japanese.
* Make sure you know some ppl there, have contacts over there before you move
* Do learn about the culture (know the dos and donts and work ethic)
* Be ready to accept the fact that you are a 'gaijin' and it will stay that way (some ppl are nice towards strangers, some not)
* Make sure you have a 'Plan B' if your 'Plan A' fails (by all mean i wish you success but make sure you have some way to get back home in case)

^_^

cheers
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26 / M / Canada
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Posted 10/22/12
There's a few ways to do this:
A) Get a degree, get a job from home, get your VISA, and go over there and work for that company.
B) Go over there, and find a company to give you a job and sponsor a VISA. A degree isn't necessary here.
C) Marry someone from there. I'm not kidding. You get a spousal VISA.
D) Start your own business.

Anyone who says there aren't jobs in Japan doesn't know the job market there. I visit the nation every now and then, and just for a 'aw what the hell', I spend one day looking for a job. I get many calls back. And I don't have a degree.

Most schools that hire you honestly don't give a damn if their students learn English or not. They just need a token white dude in the school so the parents can see that a westerner teaches their children English.

If you run a single owned proprietorship, it's possible to (kinda) sponsor your own visa. You need people to say, "Yeah, I'd contract him", and a guaranteed income, but it's possible to do this.

Hope this helps.
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33 / M / Staten Island, NY...
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Posted 10/22/12
I think my career goal is to teach Computer Science at a University in Japan for a year or two. I've teach Computer Science at a couple of colleges here in NYC. I think it would be really amazing to have the opportunity to teach it in Japan, and to teach it completely in Japanese. I am currently teaching myself the language, and will not attempt to do it until I have the skills to pass the JLPT Level 2 or 3 exam.

i.e... I am growing bored and need an adventure and a really good challenge.
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25 / M / Kyoto, Japan
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Posted 10/23/12
Go to the Boston Career Forum next year.
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21 / M / San Diego, USA
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Posted 10/23/12

iamtheredseven wrote:

isn't it even hard for the Japanese to find a job in the first place? let alone a foreigner.


Well, isn't it the same here in the states? I mean here in California, a lot of Americans have a hard time finding jobs but the illegal immigrants seem to have it down to a science.

Maybe not the strongest argument, but a paying job is a paying job, ya know.
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Posted 10/31/12
Hula for us people in Hawaii.... almost every Japanese girl and woman I know up there is obsessed with dancing hula.... so when we go up, its for teaching Hula.
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