First  Prev  1  2  Next  Last
good vs. evil what makes the best plot
8802 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
27 / M / Gotham City
Offline
Posted 9/12/12

bugsnameis wrote:

is game of thrones like the book?
or are you talking about the book
i haven't finish so don't tell me


The show is awesome but the books are much better.
25403 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
25 / M / Boston
Online
Posted 9/12/12

bugsnameis wrote:


justinitsu wrote:

I thinks it cool when there is no good vs evil, but more neutral vs neutral trying to defeat each other. Like Fate Zero or Game of Thrones. None of the players are good or evil per say, just different and they all battle each other for a central piece. As in, all the houses in Game of Thrones fighting each other for the Iron Throne.

That and when the hero dies and his followers/sidekick uses their death as motivation to defeat evil.

Oh oh and the theme of the unstoppable force clashing against the immovable object. Two powers that are so equal and opposite that the fight can't be won by either of them and a different path must be chosen in order for resolution.


is game of thrones like the book?
or are you talking about the book
i haven't finish so don't tell me


I'm currently reading the 4th book, but the show is pretty good for what it is. If I compare it to the book, it sucks, but that is the golden rule of basically anything that is adapted from a book. On it's own, it's a very good series.\ and I think reading the book def gave the show more intensity because you know so much more is happening.
34670 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
32 / F / room of iniquity
Offline
Posted 9/12/12

justinitsu wrote:


bugsnameis wrote:


justinitsu wrote:

I thinks it cool when there is no good vs evil, but more neutral vs neutral trying to defeat each other. Like Fate Zero or Game of Thrones. None of the players are good or evil per say, just different and they all battle each other for a central piece. As in, all the houses in Game of Thrones fighting each other for the Iron Throne.

That and when the hero dies and his followers/sidekick uses their death as motivation to defeat evil.

Oh oh and the theme of the unstoppable force clashing against the immovable object. Two powers that are so equal and opposite that the fight can't be won by either of them and a different path must be chosen in order for resolution.


is game of thrones like the book?
or are you talking about the book
i haven't finish so don't tell me


I'm currently reading the 4th book, but the show is pretty good for what it is. If I compare it to the book, it sucks, but that is the golden rule of basically anything that is adapted from a book. On it's own, it's a very good series.\ and I think reading the book def gave the show more intensity because you know so much more is happening.


i was trying to decide which was better
should i give up the books and just watch hbo or stick it out while my friends ooohh and ahhhh
34670 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
32 / F / room of iniquity
Offline
Posted 9/12/12

bemused_Bohemian wrote:

I find enigmas compelling, redemption too. I recently watched the movie Drive. There are a few plot holes in this neo-noir film but I liked the way Danish director Nicolas Winding Refn handled the lead character. The film has some edge and but it tends to be more of style than substance. And yes, the ending is predictable but the sequence of events arriving there is an interesting journey.

Most audiences have grown quite sophisticated from watching cinema, TV, live shows over time. Any story, live or animated, or game presented now has to consistently be interesting and memorable. No easy feat, this. Good versus bad, as previous posters have suggested, can no longer sustain and infatuate our cognitive interest indefinitely. Movies presently revered in the Criterion Collection suggest changing tastes and sentiments will also doom many cinematic efforts once thought exceptional in past eras. The Magnificent Ambersons (1942) is an example. The theme still has ongoing relevance today but the setting is stale and dated.

I like classic noir. Edge, also.



i love classic movies
and i liked the magnificent ambersons
any thing like that
any thing that tries to teach a moral lesson would be lost on younger generations like the bad seed and the portrait of dorian gray would be boring to young'uns
Posted 9/12/12
http://vndb.org/v211
13566 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
35 / New York
Offline
Posted 9/12/12
I love the Monarch from Venture Brothers.
And I like that Sasuke murders people.

So, I'm going with an awesome bad guy being most critical.
71832 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
66 / M / Columbia, MO
Offline
Posted 9/12/12

bugsnameis wrote:

need examples


North by Northwest
(1959), Alfred Hitchcock directed. I liked the crop duster scenes and sequence. People actually did wait for buses out in the middle of no darn where back in the day. The train scenes were believable also. As a train buff it was great to see the 20th Century Limited (NYC) still offering travelers a level of customer service several notches above the norm that exists now along our Nation's by-ways.

49th Parallel
(1941) Michael Powell directed. You can read the hyperbole as explained by movie critics and that's fine. I saw this movie for the first time back in 1981 when i was between real jobs, real life, living as a nomad at friends' homes 3 days at a time in search of work. What started out as a simple vacation in Utah turned into an emigration from a dead end job in Missouri to re-emancipation in the Pacific Northwest. And though I was unsuccessful finding permanent work and resettling back into the Seattle area then I was able to watch a lot of renowned movies thanks to my friends' TV sets.

This movie is a classic examination of Canada as it existed during the '30's leading up to WW2. True, it has it's moments being overwrought anti-Nazi propoganda but wow, the scenery, authoritarian imagery, morality examination pertinent to the times, iconography indigenous to a great country and its diversified population are qualities I find lacking in many documentary films today.

Brief Encounter
(1945) David Lean directed. I like trains. David Lean taught me that I have truly missed its golden era as far cinematic presence goes. His camera man did a phenomenal job conveying urgency in a metaphorical sense. Oh, and it's a good story also if you're more into romance, morality of fidelity versus career choice.

Mrs. Miniver
(1942) William Wyler directed. Yeah, I know: 7.7/10 rating. I find the older I get the more empathetic I have become. I felt this movie conveyed very believable performances about the travesties war commits upon everyone, friend or foe.

Mildred Pierce
(1945) Michael Curtiz directed. Compared to where women have advanced in overall stature today this film aptly portrays where women stood in a man's world then. If you can overlook that you will find this story quite moving and very insightful.

Bad Day at Black Rock
(1955) Directed by John Sturges. Actioner with Spencer Tracy and several other accomplished actors. Noirish film with western diorama. This is guy flick but gals can watch it too. Japanese overtones sprinkled quietly throughout.

There are many more noir out there. Some even include Bogey and Bacall.
8802 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
27 / M / Gotham City
Offline
Posted 9/12/12
L.A. Confidential and Se7en are two of my favorite 90's neo-noir films. So good.



29065 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
24 / M / Arizona
Offline
Posted 9/13/12
theres no need for good
we can have a plot with just pure evil......like arkham city minus batman... joker vs penguin vs riddler vs bane vs mr freeze vs ivy vs ras al ghul = joker becomes new king of the baddies.............. damn, that actually could be a good movie... I ELECT CHRIS NOLAN TO DIRECT IT
34670 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
32 / F / room of iniquity
Offline
Posted 9/13/12

bemused_Bohemian wrote:


bugsnameis wrote:

need examples


North by Northwest
(1959), Alfred Hitchcock directed. I liked the crop duster scenes and sequence. People actually did wait for buses out in the middle of no darn where back in the day. The train scenes were believable also. As a train buff it was great to see the 20th Century Limited (NYC) still offering travelers a level of customer service several notches above the norm that exists now along our Nation's by-ways.

49th Parallel
(1941) Michael Powell directed. You can read the hyperbole as explained by movie critics and that's fine. I saw this movie for the first time back in 1981 when i was between real jobs, real life, living as a nomad at friends' homes 3 days at a time in search of work. What started out as a simple vacation in Utah turned into an emigration from a dead end job in Missouri to re-emancipation in the Pacific Northwest. And though I was unsuccessful finding permanent work and resettling back into the Seattle area then I was able to watch a lot of renowned movies thanks to my friends' TV sets.

This movie is a classic examination of Canada as it existed during the '30's leading up to WW2. True, it has it's moments being overwrought anti-Nazi propoganda but wow, the scenery, authoritarian imagery, morality examination pertinent to the times, iconography indigenous to a great country and its diversified population are qualities I find lacking in many documentary films today.

Brief Encounter
(1945) David Lean directed. I like trains. David Lean taught me that I have truly missed its golden era as far cinematic presence goes. His camera man did a phenomenal job conveying urgency in a metaphorical sense. Oh, and it's a good story also if you're more into romance, morality of fidelity versus career choice.

Mrs. Miniver
(1942) William Wyler directed. Yeah, I know: 7.7/10 rating. I find the older I get the more empathetic I have become. I felt this movie conveyed very believable performances about the travesties war commits upon everyone, friend or foe.

Mildred Pierce
(1945) Michael Curtiz directed. Compared to where women have advanced in overall stature today this film aptly portrays where women stood in a man's world then. If you can overlook that you will find this story quite moving and very insightful.

Bad Day at Black Rock
(1955) Directed by John Sturges. Actioner with Spencer Tracy and several other accomplished actors. Noirish film with western diorama. This is guy flick but gals can watch it too. Japanese overtones sprinkled quietly throughout.

There are many more noir out there. Some even include Bogey and Bacall.


wow my friend most of those i have seen 49 parallel and brief encounter are the only ones i haven't
mildred pierce
joan crawford shines
true to her craft

ps i have a bogey collection :happy:
thank you very much
really its a gangster collection
the orginal og's

but i have a question for you there is a movie with orson wells where he is a police officer a crooked one and he plants evidence on a crime scene and the da catches him (i think he is the da)
but the thing is the guy really did do it
i hope that is enough info do you know the movie
46293 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
18 / M / Tiphares
Offline
Posted 9/13/12

Winterfells wrote:

Some of my favorite stories of good vs. evil include:

- Forces of good facing overwhelming odds
- A flawed and human hero
- A villain who is charismatic and sympathetic
- Gritty and dark story
- I tend to prefer tragic endings, or at least major sacrifices or loss to be made


This. Sometimes. Maybe also the bad guys win for a change?
71832 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
66 / M / Columbia, MO
Offline
Posted 9/13/12

bugsnameis wrote:


bemused_Bohemian wrote:


bugsnameis wrote:

need examples


but i have a question for you there is a movie with orson wells where he is a police officer a crooked one and he plants evidence on a crime scene and the da catches him (i think he is the da)
but the thing is the guy really did do it
i hope that is enough info do you know the movie


It sounds like the film Touch of Evil (1958) directed by Orson Welles based off a crime novel Badge of Evil written by Whit Masterson (thank you, Wikipedia). I have seen this movie a few times. The only other plotline similar was a movie with EG Robinson, Fred MacMurrray, Barbara Stanwyck called Double Indemnity (1944) directed by Billy Wilder....which I liked better as a thriller though the train staging scenes weren't that believable.

Highly recommend Out of the Past (1947) directed by Jacques Tournier. Classic noir with Greer Garson, Robert Mitchum, Kirk Douglas playing the triangle of intrigue, misinformation, treachery. Oh, yeah, seeing post WW2 California in b&w is a bit of a treat also.

Reiterate Bogey and Bacall: The Big Sleep (1946) directed by Howard Hawks. Probably the best Philip Marlow noir yarn I've seen and Bogart did a Cracker Jack job performing in it. I could wax poetic forever about Humprey Bogart with or without Lauren Bacall flix.
34670 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
32 / F / room of iniquity
Offline
Posted 9/13/12

bemused_Bohemian wrote:


bugsnameis wrote:


bemused_Bohemian wrote:


bugsnameis wrote:

need examples


but i have a question for you there is a movie with orson wells where he is a police officer a crooked one and he plants evidence on a crime scene and the da catches him (i think he is the da)
but the thing is the guy really did do it
i hope that is enough info do you know the movie


It sounds like the film Touch of Evil (1958) directed by Orson Welles based off a crime novel Badge of Evil written by Whit Masterson (thank you, Wikipedia). I have seen this movie a few times. The only other plotline similar was a movie with EG Robinson, Fred MacMurrray, Barbara Stanwyck called Double Indemnity (1944) directed by Billy Wilder....which I liked better as a thriller though the train staging scenes weren't that believable.

Highly recommend Out of the Past (1947) directed by Jacques Tournier. Classic noir with Greer Garson, Robert Mitchum, Kirk Douglas playing the triangle of intrigue, misinformation, treachery. Oh, yeah, seeing post WW2 California in b&w is a bit of a treat also.

Reiterate Bogey and Bacall: The Big Sleep (1946) directed by Howard Hawks. Probably the best Philip Marlow noir yarn I've seen and Bogart did a Cracker Jack job performing in it. I could wax poetic forever about Humprey Bogart with or without Lauren Bacall flix.


yes yes thank you

why didn't i think of wiki

and as regards waxing
what light yonder window breaks it is the east and bogart is the sun
arise fair sun and kill the envious moon who is already sick and pale with grief

Posted 9/14/12
I think I'm terrible at plotting things, so I'm not sure what makes a good plot.
31668 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
22 / M / Location Location
Offline
Posted 9/14/12

Winterfells wrote:

Some of my favorite stories of good vs. evil include:

- Forces of good facing overwhelming odds
- A flawed and human hero
- A villain who is charismatic and sympathetic
- Gritty and dark story
- I tend to prefer tragic endings, or at least major sacrifices or loss to be made


I strongly agree here. Especially with the villain being charismatic and sympathetic.

First  Prev  1  2  Next  Last
You must be logged in to post.