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What's your mental disorder?
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15 / F / Cali
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Posted 10/18/12
i cant sleep i have a really hard time and also studying i keep on looking at the damn wall
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23 / M / Lichfield, UK
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Posted 10/18/12
I'm too laid back.
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24 / M / South America
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Posted 10/18/12
i like Gintama lol
Posted 10/18/12
I was diagnosed with schizo-affective disorder about 10 years back. Most people don't know what the label really means, and that lack of understanding is also common among mental health care professionals where I live. After reflecting for a long period of time, I have come to understand it to mean that, basically, instead of escaping awareness of personal trouble and strife through things like alcohol or drugs, I have responded by becoming ungrounded (i.e. less aware of my physical body and surroundings) and spending a lot of time in my head, so to speak. However, when you are not "grounded" and spend time in the mental realm in order to try and escape physical problems, you can get out of whack. I am not talking about being a "day dreamer" or something like that, but rather an unbalanced state where, in extreme cases you are not in your right mind and do obviously unusual things and not really be aware of it, such as walking down the middle of a busy street in your pajamas and not noticing the people yelling at you or giving you the finger. (No, not personal experience - just an example).

The coping strategy of leaving awareness of your body behind makes sense when you think about where the pattern may have originated for some people when they were infants. Infants cannot run away from stimulation in the home. They can't physically escape chronic stress and trauma that may be ocurring in their home with their mom and dad or care provider. So, the way I see it, the infant in that situation feels pretty scared, and the world feels completely unsafe. They can't run away, so they remove their connection or awareness of the physical and "check out" mentally. This saves the infant from directly feeling or being directly aware of the experience they were trying to avoid.

For me, I managed to come into some balance as I passed that particular phase of my development, but I ran into problems when I "left the nest" so to speak and moved out on my own. In my opinion, I think that my move reactivated those infancy patterns of feeling that the world is unsafe, and the mind/body patterns of being ungrounded and checking out mentally, because it really was a stressful time for me, and my self confidence in succeeding on my own "in the real world" was shaky at best. I would imagine that infants who have experienced this early pattern are more prone as adults to developing that same type of pattern when they encounter longer periods of high stress and fear, which is then labeled as some type of psychotic mental disorder and treated at that level. I have no medical or psychological training, so take my opinion for what you will. That being said, I believe quite strongly that mental illness is not simply some chemical imbalance which asserts itself into a person's experience. Rather, I am of the belief that the innate personality/mental traits of a person interacts with their life experiences and acquired beliefs in a way that then causes imbalance in many areas of a persons life, and the chemical imbalance in the brain would be a reflection of that.
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27 / Naked in a pine tree
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Posted 10/18/12

Jack_McFlack wrote:

I was diagnosed with schizo-affective disorder about 10 years back. Most people don't know what the label really means, and that lack of understanding is also common among mental health care professionals where I live. After reflecting for a long period of time, I have come to understand it to mean that, basically, instead of escaping awareness of personal trouble and strife through things like alcohol or drugs, I have responded by becoming ungrounded (i.e. less aware of my physical body and surroundings) and spending a lot of time in my head, so to speak. However, when you are not "grounded" and spend time in the mental realm in order to try and escape physical problems, you can get out of whack. I am not talking about being a "day dreamer" or something like that, but rather an unbalanced state where, in extreme cases you are not in your right mind and do obviously unusual things and not really be aware of it, such as walking down the middle of a busy street in your pajamas and not noticing the people yelling at you or giving you the finger. (No, not personal experience - just an example).

The coping strategy of leaving awareness of your body behind makes sense when you think about where the pattern may have originated for some people when they were infants. Infants cannot run away from stimulation in the home. They can't physically escape chronic stress and trauma that may be ocurring in their home with their mom and dad or care provider. So, the way I see it, the infant in that situation feels pretty scared, and the world feels completely unsafe. They can't run away, so they remove their connection or awareness of the physical and "check out" mentally. This saves the infant from directly feeling or being directly aware of the experience they were trying to avoid.

For me, I managed to come into some balance as I passed that particular phase of my development, but I ran into problems when I "left the nest" so to speak and moved out on my own. In my opinion, I think that my move reactivated those infancy patterns of feeling that the world is unsafe, and the mind/body patterns of being ungrounded and checking out mentally, because it really was a stressful time for me, and my self confidence in succeeding on my own "in the real world" was shaky at best. I would imagine that infants who have experienced this early pattern are more prone as adults to developing that same type of pattern when they encounter longer periods of high stress and fear, which is then labeled as some type of psychotic mental disorder and treated at that level. I have no medical or psychological training, so take my opinion for what you will. That being said, I believe quite strongly that mental illness is not simply some chemical imbalance which asserts itself into a person's experience. Rather, I am of the belief that the innate personality/mental traits of a person interacts with their life experiences and acquired beliefs in a way that then causes imbalance in many areas of a persons life, and the chemical imbalance in the brain would be a reflection of that.


Schizo affective is pretty much bi-polar/schizophrenia combined. So yeah, that's what I have too. I can't go a single day where I am not thankful to still be alive after some of the turmoil that it has put me through.

Good read btw. Glad to know there are others out there and that I'm not alone in it.
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25 / F / Sexual Chocolate
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Posted 10/18/12 , edited 10/18/12
I've been told i'm a narcissist but I maintain that i'm merely an ego maniac.

I'm also an optimist which probably qualifies as a mental disorder.
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25
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Posted 10/18/12
I have ADHD, mainly inattention and some impulsiveness. Though it's a learning disability, really. A blessing and a curse.
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F
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Posted 10/18/12
I currently have NO disorders, thank god, but I do have a problem with procrastination and staying up super late.
.....those don't count, do they. o-o/
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Posted 10/19/12
I'm too laid back, i don't work, study or anything that other people do at my age (21) i just play video games and watch anime the whole day (no sense life) i have suicidal tendencies (i don't know if that is a mental disorder) and i hated to talk with other people or assist Parties from when i was about 5 or 6 years.
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27 / World Wide Web
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Posted 10/19/12
I have AS, Asperger Sydrome (also known as Autism Spectrum Disorder according to my doctor.)

Sometime's I love my AS and at other times I hate it, trying to sleep is a nightmare, and sometimes when I'm doing something I like, that makes me really happy, I tend to forget to sleep, shower and eat.
Trying to find a job is also a nightmare, potential employers only see the obstacles, because I lack social capacity, and not the possibilities.
Posted 10/19/12

netdisorder wrote:

Schizo affective is pretty much bi-polar/schizophrenia combined. So yeah, that's what I have too. I can't go a single day where I am not thankful to still be alive after some of the turmoil that it has put me through.

Good read btw. Glad to know there are others out there and that I'm not alone in it.


Agreed. Going through this sort of experience can feel very isolating, and it is nice to know that, actually, we are not alone in this. Best wishes to you.
Posted 10/19/12
I don't have any that I'm aware of...

I am a bit unsociable... but I think that was due to my upbringing rather than something biological.
Posted 10/19/12
"He broke" that's what they said lol!
I just don't give a buck of anything anymore, dunno what's the name of this disorder (if it has any name ).
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Posted 10/19/12

Winterfells wrote:

I have addiction problems.


Dun worry man, everyone does. but ever tried rehab?
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20 / M / Milton Keynes
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Posted 10/19/12 , edited 10/20/12
Matt DAMONNNNNN! anyone get the refernce
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