First  Prev  1  2  3  Next  Last
Is 63 too old to be an Otaku?
60483 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
46 / M / Bay Area, CA, USA
Offline
Posted 11/3/12
"Otaku" seems to have varying connotations, especially as an English word (while I hear it is more consistently a pejorative in Japanese). If one takes it as simply being a fan of anime or related Japanese culture, I'd say there's no real age limit at all, and nothing inherently wrong with it. If being an otaku begins to interfere with your other duties and responsibilities (e.g. work, family, being a law-abiding productive citizen and not a social parasite, etc.), then there's a problem, but it doesn't really have to do with age nor Japanese culture in particular. Others might not share your particular enthusiasm, but so it is with potentially any other interest or hobby.
Posted 11/3/12

sushipath wrote:

"Otaku" seems to have varying connotations, especially as an English word (while I hear it is more consistently a pejorative in Japanese). If one takes it as simply being a fan of anime or related Japanese culture, I'd say there's no real age limit at all, and nothing inherently wrong with it. If being an otaku begins to interfere with your other duties and responsibilities (e.g. work, family, being a law-abiding productive citizen and not a social parasite, etc.), then there's a problem, but it doesn't really have to do with age nor Japanese culture in particular. Others might not share your particular enthusiasm, but so it is with potentially any other interest or hobby.


You know it well.

Otaku has become a broad term, though sourced as a epithet for those who spend all their time indoors with their unsavory hobbies.

I wonder what otaku in the depths of Russian slums are like....
Posted 11/9/12
Youre never too old to be an otaku, heck i'm sure anime/manga creators are in their 60's
Posted 11/10/12
Nope. Anime is for all ages.
112 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
39 / M / Canada
Offline
Posted 11/11/12
I think your passion about Japanese stuff is just fine. Your family worries about your love of anime and manga because they don't understand it. People tend to worry about their loved ones when they see them doing something they don't understand. It is not a sign you are doing something wrong, it is just a sign that you are doing something they don't understand. It is also a sign they love you. They would probably worry as much if you would do another activity they don't understand. It is not about manga and anime. My advice is to try to share your passion with them. Go easy with them and try to convince them to watch a few anime movies with you. Watch one that everybody can relate to, like the anime Princess Mononoke from Hayao Miyazaki or any other anime made by him. That's how I did it with my family.
6040 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
M
Offline
Posted 11/12/12
Nah dude I'm gonna be an "Otaku" until I die. lol
841 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
21 / F / Fish Bowl
Offline
Posted 11/15/12
Anime is for all ages.

I will be an Otaku forever. :'3
31331 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
Offline
Posted 11/17/12
Your 63 years old. You have grandchildren. As long as it isn't interfering in your life, watch anime to your heart's content.
12109 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
65 / F / Florida
Offline
Posted 11/21/12
I'll be 62 yrd in Jan. I have no intentions of giving up anime or video games, although the games are frustrating sometimes because of the controls and my reaction time. Come along way from pong ( I have one of those) got it from an old bar. Also have a TRS 80. I wish I had held onto all the old gaming systems that I bought my son as he was growing up.

I may be "not young" but I refuse to be old.
Posted 11/22/12
I honestly don't see it as a problem. We currently live in an age in the states where anime/manga are slowly becoming more and more accepted through various age groups because of technology(Go Crunchyroll!). For example, comic books had their baby phase as well, and look how they've manifested in the present. I think you should try to find a way to shape the situation where your family could respect your healthy habit/passion. There are definitely some anime titles out there that are thought provoking that would make anyone think twice about anime and its sub-culture. Try some of the Studio Ghibli films, or something for beginners like Cowboy Bebop and Samurai Champloo.

I hope I was able to give you a different outlook, and I hope things fall in place for you sir. I'd also like to thank you for serving our country, and that's coming from a fellow Coastie!
19127 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
29 / F / iowa
Offline
Posted 11/23/12 , edited 11/23/12
There's a difference between growing out of shows meant for children (like cagdog and recess) and cutting yourself off from a hobby you enjoy because the people around you don't approve. As long as your hobbies aren't hurting anyone, you shouldn't change yourself to fit someone elses idea of what you should be like! If I have kids, I hope to instill a love for anime, or at least make sure they respect my anime-watching hobby! If they ended up thinking it was weird though, I'd tell em to piss off. Lil' bastards. In my opinion, I think it's fantastic for an older person to stay passionate about their hobbies. Like you said, who wants to just sit around waiting to get old and die? Keep on keepin' on!

(Also, those of you discussing the connotation of 'otaku'... in Japan, the word conjures up an image similar to the zit-faced, Cheetos eating fat guy that sits in his mom's basement all day. What it means literally is someone who engages in a hobby to an unhealthy extent, particularly games, comics, anime, and figurine collecting. Lots of people in America use the word otaku to describe their love for anime, which a lot of times is actually appropriate. The extent to which many of us watch anime would most certainly get us labeled 'otaku' in Japan. So, if you ever to to Japan, I wouldn't recommend talking about how much you love anime with random people unless they mention they enjoy it first. It's definitely not considered a good thing in mainstream Japanese society. Honestly, it's pretty much the same thing in the states, we just celebrate diversity a little more and 'nerd fashion' etc. has become popular in the past few years. I think i'm rambling. A lot. I'm really off topic. Delete this if I'm too off topic here! Just wanted to put in my two cents on the otaku thing... )
Posted 11/23/12
Haha Thats Legit!!
Better then what most old people do... WATCH THE NEWS... sigh...
I don't see how it's sooo damn interesting lol. I mean it is but watching it all day...
It pretty much just repeats it over and over again.
13188 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
F / Texas & California
Offline
Posted 11/23/12

Apaitu wrote:

Here I am 63 years of age and I am a self confessed Otaku. I have been a gamer since Pong and into Anime since Rama 1/2 came out. Been reading Japanese Manga since the mid 70's . My very first computer was a Commodore Vic 20 and I built my first PC in 88.

My kids think I am nuts and my Grand Kids think I am the greatest. Before you think I am a recluse I was a Staff Seargent in the Army and I am also into collecting and shooting old military firearms. I reload my own ammo and try to make it to the range at least twice a week. I all so enjoy fishing and boating. But as I get older I am enjoying my anime and manga more. That has my family worried. Do any of you think I should "Act My Age?". I for one do not want to become just another OLD FART waiting to die.

To grow old is mandatory! To grow up is optional.



"You're only young once, but you can be immature forever."

Nope, you're not too old. I'm a bit older than you are. When you no longer develop new interests you are getting old. I noted to myself when I was about, mmmmm, 24 perhaps, and was painting a watercolor series and began keeping what I called "Marginal Notes," things the left side of my brain would blurt out when the right side was thoroughly engaged, in order to note what the left was saying so it wouid not feel left out, "The only sin is to not be learning." It's served me well and proven true.

We're weird, but so what. I can't just curl up and die because I have aged. It makes some people uncomfortable, and I know that some things I enjoy doing are not very appropriate for my appearance, so I try to moderate some behavior, but not much. I grew up at the beach.

I also dreaded turning 30 and beginning the long slide into "old." On my 30th birthday, I felt better than I had in a long time. I squared my shoulders and said, "Well, this is is, darlin'. Whatever you thought you were going to be, you are what you are now, and you might as well feel good about it and stop struggling to bend yourself this way and that way to try to make yourself what you think other people want," and concluded with Popeye's, "I yam what I yam and that's all what I yam," and, though I didn't know it, the best was yet to come. It felt so good to realize that I certainly was not old and that I could take a deep breath and relax -- never stop working on improving myself but to stop pressuring myself with changes. I'd done what I had done and that was that.

I didn't like Manga or Anime for a long time: the tiny lips and big eyes made me laugh hysterically if I were subjected to them. I had also seen early anime --1960s-- on tv here and didn't like it because not only did the mouths not move enough -- the characters were like paper dolls that moved from place to place in scenes from time to time, and I preferred the sophistication of Disney's animation. I did however, love underground comics.

I was teaching English to Japanese actors in a theatre school here in the late 1990s and they told me about "Cave of the Fireflies," saying that they all watched it in school. They also told me that they hadn't seen much Akira Kurasawa's work, though they certainly knew who he was and held him in high regard. One of them, a baseball player, brought a videotape of that film in for me to watch and I was amazed: the animation was so graceful. I was particularly taken with the way the young girl's hair moved as she turned her head. Disney's characters' hair didn't move much, if at all (except for in Fantasia, which we all had the Jones for -- the sweet little centaur girls, were they? with long soft hair and tiny little hints of breasts was an enchanting scene, and a lot of anime plays on this same sweet loving feeling of gentleness; it is central to younger anime girls and we all love it -- I think.).

Anyway, that one movement in Cave of the Fireflies told me that Japanese Anime had come a long way since the days of wooden paper doll characters, mostly guys doing guy stuff like racing cars and flying spaceships.

I may have seen another one or two in the meantime, but it was not until 2002 that I started watching late-night Adult Swim when I came to Texas and my husband worked nights: I started watching Inuyasha just for the backgrounds. It reminded me of doing cross-country running in Taiwan as well as reminded me of painting watercolors in Taiwan. Then came Naruto, an odd role model to discover over the age of 50.
It was so well-constructed in terms of plot and character that I remained enthralled. When Jiraiya and Tsunade arrived, I was in heaven. I miss Jiraiya and feel he fell victim to plot by committe and popular vote. It's depressing not having him around and having Tsunade up to shenanigans. Well, when you have an international audience and the Americans are censoring what is presented because it is in cartoon format and therefore must be for children . . . . "Gee, they were old:" 50! "Better tone them down or put them out to pasture now," and the series lost some of the richly developed depth it had had with them a part of it.

Enough of this. I just had to say, "Hey," and the mention of Jiraiya and Tsunade brought me back to the point at which we started: "Am I too old for Anime?" Nope. Too bad some of the producers think we are. I'm 12, which I discovered when I was about 39.
I've mentioned here that I may be the oldest Anime fan, at least on this site, and didn't make a deal of it. That's the nice part of the internet and the chat/forum places. People can get to know each other by their personalities and their appearance does not stand in the way of that, as it does in daily life.

I kind of turned invisible after 55, so I cut my hair spiky and short, and then I dyed it pink. People could see me again and always had a big smile when they saw me, and I felt good again. My husband hated it because he said people would laugh behind my back. I told him I didn't really care what people did behind my back: they didn't count and there was no reason they should. The people who really counted were the ones who smiled when they saw me, who felt uplifted by seeing me with pink hair, people who came to my face and said they loved my hair, or slowed down their car to tell me that -- even a shout-out from the driver of a horse-drawn fancy cart for tourism.

Hair's white again -- but I grew it long, first thinking I might cosplay Inuyasha, and later, Jiraiya. Have done neither. Love my white hair, though. I'm lucky the way it turned out.

Then I have my alter-egos, who wear clothes I would wear and pose for pictures for me . . . (see pic below) . . . and my wonderful dog, who goes everywhere with me, and who will curl his lip and bark at anyone who looks at me in a way he feels is unacceptable. It rarely happens; when it does it's very reassuring. He is really cool. Yesterday was his 13th birthday.



27306 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
39 / M / Maryland
Offline
Posted 11/25/12
Age is just a number. And you like what like. dont stop liking something cause you older. your never too old to like otaku
54525 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
F
Offline
Posted 11/25/12
NO
First  Prev  1  2  3  Next  Last
You must be logged in to post.