First  Prev  1  2  Next  Last
Post Reply Why make a Brazilian site, when Brazil only gets half the simulcasts?
67854 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
53 / M / Northeast Ohio, USA
Offline
Posted 11/1/12 , edited 11/1/12
I'd guess that many people have seen the news, but if you haven't, this is a reaction to the great news today, Crunchyroll Brings Anime to Brazil! ~ Online streaming site targets the largest country in South America.

tl;dr summary from the comments:

JoeSurf wrote: Let me summarize the top post: Why make a Brazil site? Could it of been a mistake? (Insert details of POTENTIAL problems here) What do YOU guys think?

My personal take? It's a start. Showing support for Brazil brings good news to the Brazilian anime fans. If enough people subscribe on there, maybe Crunchyroll will point that out to it's providers. And the providers might help bring more anime options for Brazil in the long run. So I see future royals for that!


For the past couple of years, I've been tracking the regions that get new simulcasts each season.

Brazil gets its own row in my spreadsheets, because it normally gets all licenses that Spanish American and the Caribbean gets, and sometimes it gets "Brazil and Portugal" as a license region. So its normally one or two series more than Spanish America and the Caribbean, but still, very close to Spanish American results.

And someone who turns their language to Spanish in the bottom of the page and dipped into the Spanish forum sees one regular theme, among the various series-discussion threads: complaints about license limitations.

Since Spring 2011, setting aside "shorts" and one-off episodes, and focusing on premium members, I have this for Brazil (Brazil/US format):

12/13 Spring 2011
9/12 Summer 2011
5/13 Fall 2011
7/11 Winter 2012
11/20 Spring 2012
12/19 Summer 2012
7/14 Fall 2012

And this for Spanish America:

9/13 Spring 2011
8/12 Summer 2011
4/13 Fall 2011
6/11 Winter 2012
10/20 Spring 2012
12/19 Summer 2012
6/14 Fall 2012

So, a question some people might have is, why bother with a "site" for Brazil, or for Spanish America, if a lot of the time its only going to be getting half of the series that are available in Canada and the US? I mean, that is always going to be causing complaints from Latin American members ~ every single comment thread for a series blocked in Latin America is always full of "why is Crunchyroll ignoring Latin America?" comments.

But that is grabbing the telescope on the wrong end.

What does Crunchyroll need to get more licenses for Latin America, like the roughly 70% to 80% that the UK and the Nordic countries in Europe get? It needs more members in Latin America.

Crunchyroll may be a business, but it works a lot like a cooperative buying club. More subscribers from a single license region means more royalty revenues for series licensed for those regions. From our side, as members, it looks like the individual subscription is the same. But in Japan, the licensors are looking at likely revenue from each license region they grant.

After all, it probably costs the Japanese licensors money for each license region they grant, because they have to do due diligence on the license contract, and the more license regions, the longer the due diligence is likely to take. And lawyers charge by the minute, not by the contract.

Now, "get more licenses" is the easy answer to getting more members, but that is a "chicken and the egg" problem: Crunchyroll is already getting the contracts they can based on the number of members they already have.

So the strategy that Crunchyroll is pursuing is adding value to the licenses they are already getting, by subtitling them into Spanish, and now into Portuguese. That makes sense, because contracting costs are greater than subtitling costs.

If it works, then the number of subscribers attracted by the existing licenses will be larger. And if that happens, the fraction of series licensed to Latin America will begin to rise.

Looking at the numbers above, that rise won't be a steady climb. It will often be "two steps forward, and one step back." But if it works, over the longer term, there will be a increase in the fraction of series that get licensed to Latin America.

Of course, that is good news to everybody, and not just to Latin American members, because the more royalties that Crunchyroll generates, the easier it is for Crunchyroll to get licenses.

Its even possible that one day, if Crunchyroll keeps growing its membership, Crunchyroll will be able to join the production committee of some anime. When that happens, Crunchyroll will start out with worldwide streaming rights outside of Japan, and be the licensor with North American home video distributors, instead of having to sublicense so many series from them.
47364 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
M/F - Michigan
Offline
Posted 11/1/12
This belongs in the feedback section not the anime section ^.^;
28143 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
23 / M / Texas
Offline
Posted 11/1/12
Ohhh, the subcategory issue! Let a mod handle that. And sides, I do not believe that many people head to the feedback section except for a mere few. So not many will go there and give feedback as OP may want. At least, I assume.

Let me summarize the top post: Why make a Brazil site? Could it of been a mistake? (Insert details of POTENTIAL problems here) What do YOU guys think?

My personal take? It's a start. Showing support for Brazil brings good news to the Brazilian anime fans. If enough people subscribe on there, maybe Crunchyroll will point that out to it's providers. And the providers might help bring more anime options for Brazil in the long run. So I see future royals for that! :)

Other than that, I don't know what else to say.
17252 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
21 / M / Tokyo
Offline
Posted 11/1/12

JoeSurf

My personal take? It's a start. Showing support for Brazil brings good news to the Brazilian anime fans. If enough people subscribe on there, maybe Crunchyroll will point that out to it's providers. And the providers might help bring more anime options for Brazil in the long run. So I see future royals for that! :)



That..... literally just sums it up in one swing ;p


67854 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
53 / M / Northeast Ohio, USA
Offline
Posted 11/1/12 , edited 11/1/12

kitsuneshoujo wrote: This belongs in the feedback section not the anime section ^.^;

Except, this post is not giving Crunchyroll feedback.

If the pirate post last week belonged in Anime, and all the discussion about how and why different parts of the world can or cannot get series in the "Fall 2012" etc. thread belongs in Anime, this post belongs in Anime.


JoeSurf wrote: My personal take? It's a start. Showing support for Brazil brings good news to the Brazilian anime fans.

Yup, pretty much.


If enough people subscribe on there, maybe Crunchyroll will point that out to it's providers.

No maybe about it! If more people subscribe from Latin America, Crunchyroll can afford to bump up the bonus they add to the Minimum Guarantee when Latin American is included.

Sure, Crunchyroll can make arguments, "if you license the series, it will help build the market", yadda yadda yadda, but the dollar figures in the offer are going to be what licensors look at first.
1390 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
31 / M / São Paulo/SP
Offline
Posted 11/1/12
Brazil hads a poor anime market,with CR it's grow much from now ^^
67854 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
53 / M / Northeast Ohio, USA
Offline
Posted 11/1/12

Yagami-chin wrote: Brazil hads a poor anime market,with CR it's grow much from now ^^

That's what I am happy to hear: news from where it happens!

Do you think the Portuguese subtitles will help get more views in Brasil?
3047 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
Offline
Posted 11/1/12
More Subtitles & websites & shows is good. Still waiting for that magical time when we in the UK and indeed across the world get 100% of the anime the US gets.
67854 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
53 / M / Northeast Ohio, USA
Offline
Posted 11/1/12

michaeldonkey2 wrote: More Subtitles & websites & shows is good. Still waiting for that magical time when we in the UK and indeed across the world get 100% of the anime the US gets.

That's years down the track ... those kinds of changes in the legal world don't change rapidly.

Indeed, it seems like the day when some titles come to Crunchyroll that are for UK & the Nordic Countries and/or Latin America but not for North America seems likely to be closer.
3047 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
Offline
Posted 11/1/12
That's why it's my dream to become a lawyer and make the differences in the legal world. I will become a lawyer! Believe It!
22993 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
21 / M / Lichfield, UK
Online
Posted 11/1/12
This can only be a good thing, it should help get anime more noticed worldwide.
Outside Japan and the US it is very niche so this is a small step in the right direction.
67854 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
53 / M / Northeast Ohio, USA
Offline
Posted 11/1/12

hickey1992 wrote: This can only be a good thing, it should help get anime more noticed worldwide.
Outside Japan and the US it is very niche so this is a small step in the right direction.

I think its growing in France and almost as big in France as in the US (compared to the number of people), but that makes sense, because manga is bigger in France than in the US ... the French have a long history of graphic novels that are a lot more like Japanese Manga than the US comic book industry, so manga is an easier sell in France.

And in parts of Asia like Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia, the Philippines, some types of anime has been a steady thing on broadcast TV.

But, yeah, for a lot of the world, getting their series on Crunchyroll and available worldwide outside of Japan is one of the smartest thing that the anime production committees could do to help grow the international market. Its like you have to plant the seeds before you can expect to reap the harvest.
28143 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
23 / M / Texas
Offline
Posted 11/1/12 , edited 11/1/12

hickey1992 wrote:

This can only be a good thing, it should help get anime more noticed worldwide.
Outside Japan and the US it is very niche so this is a small step in the right direction.


This ^


agila61 wrote:


hickey1992 wrote: This can only be a good thing, it should help get anime more noticed worldwide.
Outside Japan and the US it is very niche so this is a small step in the right direction.

I think its growing in France and almost as big in France as in the US (compared to the number of people), but that makes sense, because manga is bigger in France than in the US ... the French have a long history of graphic novels that are a lot more like Japanese Manga than the US comic book industry, so manga is an easier sell in France.

And in parts of Asia like Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia, the Philippines, some types of anime has been a steady thing on broadcast TV.

But, yeah, for a lot of the world, getting their series on Crunchyroll and available worldwide outside of Japan is one of the smartest thing that the anime production committees could do to help grow the international market. Its like you have to plant the seeds before you can expect to reap the harvest.


And that ^
5306 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
27 / M / Virginia, USA
Offline
Posted 11/1/12
Answer: Get a Free US/CA proxy. Problem solved.
67854 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
53 / M / Northeast Ohio, USA
Offline
Posted 11/1/12

YuSooKey wrote: Answer: Get a Free US/CA proxy. Problem solved.

(1) It only solves the problem for the person with the proxy. Watching the series available to your country helps more series become available in your country. It treats the symptom, it doesn't help cure the disease.

(2) Not every free proxy has the bandwidth to handle streaming at good video quality.

(3) A paid proxy gets better bandwidth, but then the money is going to the proxy company, not to the people who make the anime.
First  Prev  1  2  Next  Last
You must be logged in to post.