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Post Reply Why make a Brazilian site, when Brazil only gets half the simulcasts?
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21 / M / São Paulo, Brazil
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Posted 11/1/12 , edited 11/2/12
The main problem with this working at Brazil is that the internet connection here is extremely expensive so most don't have enough to watch the stream with good quality. And well, we never had any legal service for anime so most are used to downloading from fansubs. I hope it works though. Kinda glad a few fansubs here have already dropped their projects due to respect for CR.

Well, for the rest, CR should step it up and deliver better subtitles because I checked Gintama and it was laughably bad. Oh, also, a lot of animes aren't available with the brazilian portuguese subtitles just yet.


agila61 wrote:
Do you think the Portuguese subtitles will help get more views in Brasil?

Definitely. It's a shame that the new members have not been impressed since most series aren't subtitled just yet. Wish CR would have translated everything before releasing it(for example, only 10 episodes of Bleach are available as of now). Oh well. Will spread the word when things have settled down.
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Posted 11/2/12

leokiko123 wrote: Well, for the rest, CR should step it up and deliver better subtitles because I checked Gintama and it was laughably bad. Oh, also, a lot of animes aren't available with the brazilian portuguese subtitles just yet.

Remember to encourage people to use the subtitle report function to help them improve the quality of the subtitles ~ most people at Crunchyroll would have to take it on faith as far as the quality of the subbing.

I don't know whether any of the backtitles had existing release subtitles to work with, or whether Crunchyroll is doing it all in house.



agila61 wrote:
Do you think the Portuguese subtitles will help get more views in Brasil?

Definitely. It's a shame that the new members have not been impressed since most series aren't subtitled just yet. Wish CR would have translated everything before releasing it(for example, only 10 episodes of Bleach are available as of now). Oh well. Will spread the word when things have settled down.

Yes, this is the same thing that Crunchyroll has when they do a new encoding, except even worse ... subbing a long series takes a bit of time. Doing it as the series is simulcast means that as the titles accumulate, a lot of the catalog will already have been subbed, but when they just launch a new language, there is a big backlog to work through.
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Posted 11/2/12

michaeldonkey2 wrote:

More Subtitles & websites & shows is good. Still waiting for that magical time when we in the UK and indeed across the world get 100% of the anime the US gets.


To be fair though, the only shows we are missing out on from the Fall schedule are Fairy Tail, Magi, Medaka Box and Ebiten (and Magi is free to see at Anime on Demand )

Any pain comes from the back catalogue. It's frustrating that we can't see Bakemonogatari even though we can see Nisemonogatari. It's a pity that the licenses don't include the UK, but I guess they were all signed years ago.
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Posted 11/2/12
I don't see problem with this. More is good, I will say. Let's not forget Brazil has a huge Japanese diaspora community, so Japanese Brazilians (and common Brazillians) will be able to watch anime. Let's not forget about K-drama, and Asian dramas. If there was any complaints about Brazil not getting enough Asian dramas, CR could fix that. Who knows? Maybe Brazil could end up remaking one K-drama into a Telenovelas. I could imagine Boys over Flowers doing well as a live-action telenovelas set in Brazil.
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Posted 11/3/12 , edited 11/3/12

icecreamsnow wrote: ... Any pain comes from the back catalogue. It's frustrating that we can't see Bakemonogatari even though we can see Nisemonogatari. It's a pity that the licenses don't include the UK, but I guess they were all signed years ago.

Hi icecreamsnow, how are you doing!

I don't have any insider knowledge, of course, but it seems that getting more catalog titles in Latin America also depends on subscriber numbers. It might be a package deal, either for series that Crunchyroll already has for North America, or a package deal with a Latin American distributor/licensor, to keep costs down ...
... but still, having enough subscribers is the key to covering the contracting costs for a contract that focuses on Latin America alone.


mdo7 wrote: ... If there was any complaints about Brazil not getting enough Asian dramas, CR could fix that. ...

I think Viki has rights to stream a number of dramas to Latin America ... maybe it would be possible for Crunchyroll to do some kind of standing agreement with Viki ... for instance, direct ad-streams to the Viki site, and stream to Crunchyroll subscribers from Crunchyroll.
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35 / M / UK
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Posted 11/3/12
It's a catch 22 situation. They need the subscribers to justify the service, but need the service in order to get the subscribers. They have to start somewhere though.

I'd be interested to see exactly what they come up with. I mean, will we see a www.crunchyroll.br with articles written in portuguese?
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Posted 11/3/12 , edited 2/8/13

icecreamsnow wrote: It's a catch 22 situation. They need the subscribers to justify the service, but need the service in order to get the subscribers. They have to start somewhere though.

I'd be interested to see exactly what they come up with. I mean, will we see a www.crunchyroll.br with articles written in portuguese?

The Latin American site in Spanish has news articles translated into Spanish.

I guess that's the point of the portuguese subtitles: they are the least expensive way to add additional value for Brasileiro subscribers, and the hope is that adding value will attract more subscribers. Growing the subscriber base then makes it easier to get more titles.

Will it be enough to make a large enough addition to titles to then pull in still more subscribers, and so on? Only way to find out is to try it.


0ut
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Posted 11/5/12 , edited 11/5/12
I know I'm new, but let me have a say in this since I'm Brazilian.

Unfortunately, anime here in Brasil isn't that much well-known than, say, Philippines or France. Animes that have been broadcasted here either was to cable-tv users (which is just a small parcel) or was those stapler-shonen hits from 1970~early 2000's (like Inuyasha, DBZ, Saint Seya, Pokémon, Digimon and the likes). Just recently, about 2~3 years ago, that people around here discovered a new facet of animes with the internet (and, really, broadband internet prices here is a robbery compared to other countries).

"Does portuguese subtitles help creating more anime fans here?" Of course. Even without some series that I love, most people here will droll over SAO and Shinsekai, so there isn't much to worry about, and with as little as that subscription fee to watch the episodes, support the creators and the service itself to bring more and more series, it will be quite a revolution around here, since most people (and me) resorts to fan-translations instead of watching it in another language. (please, don't flame me with critics now, because this fact probably was a lot debated here and I don't wanna restart it).

...and well, a website in portuguese is *way* better than just "a spanish site to all Latin America". I don't know why, but quite a lot people overseas ask me if Brazil's main language is Spanish, and when I say it isn't, they become quite shocked or they think I'm lying... and just as much as USA and British users gets pissed off when we say theirs languages is the same except for one or two words, we too get pissed off with this.

To sum it all, if the subtitles and the support given to our language can be on par of those other countries', I don't see where's the problem. I know a bunch of people that would support it with all their might ^^
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Posted 11/5/12
Perhaps they are trying to expand their market and trying to convince the licensors to sell them rights to Brazil, since they now have a localized version for them?
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Posted 2/8/13
Is it working?

Too early to tell, but (note: short series counted as 0.1, so "9.1" means nine normal series and one short) :

Fall 2012:
Free: 9.1 / 19.1 (48%)
Premium: 12.1 / 19.1 (63%)

Winter 2013
Free: 11.6 / 18.6 (62%)
Premium: 11.6 / 18.6 (62%)

The Fall had three series that had narrower distribution for free members and fairly wide distribution for premium members, which boosted the "premium" access for Latin America.

The Winter distribution was not resting so much on how many series go wide distribution. If the 11 simulcasts starting in Winter 2013 that are streaming to Latin America, only three are on very wide distribution. One is only streaming to North and South America, and four more are streaming to Latin America despite being unavailable for Australia / New Zealand.

That is by no means proof that the strategy is working, but they are at least hints that that the Spanish Language and Portuguese Language initiative may in fact be working in getting Latin American rights to series that might have been blocked for Latin American a couple of years ago.
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