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Japanese Game
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18 / M / anime4fantasy@hot...
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Posted 11/7/12 , edited 11/10/12
This is a game to link words in japanese. I think it will help build people's grammar. Below is an example. This is in Romaji only, but you may put the hiragana / katakana next to it. What methods do you all use to learn japanese??

I say Samui (cold)

Someone says Samukunai (Not cold)

Then someone says a word linked to that. You may also use short sentences as long as people know what the word means.

Like Kyo wa samui desu yo (Today, it is cold ..)

I'll start off:

Samukunai (Not cold)
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23 / F / The Netherlands
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Posted 11/7/12
Would be better if you added Kana or Kanji, Romaji is a pest. Can't play, my vocabulary is not good enough yet
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M / Georgia
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Posted 11/8/12
I don't quite understand the rules. What do you mean by "linked"?
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18 / M / anime4fantasy@hot...
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Posted 11/8/12

I don't quite understand the rules. What do you mean by "linked"?


You just have to say a word that connects to the previous one. Like with cold, you can say hot, and with hot, you can say weather.

But has to be in japanese, and a word that you know. You can check for words off the internet too.

I'll continue:

Tenki (Weather)
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43 / M / Reno, NV, USA
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Posted 11/8/12
BTW, there is a Japanese Shiritori thread buried somewhere in the Forum Games section, which would probably be more challenging, especially for those trying to increase their vocabulary. That a word or phrase merely be "linked" is not particularly limiting (i.e. maybe too easy).

(I'm at work, so I can't type in kana or kanji at the moment...)

Tenki wa samukunatta yo. (The weather has gotten cold!)
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M / Georgia
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Posted 11/8/12 , edited 11/8/12
Thanks. I think it would be more fun and good practice for improving on grammar if we do short sentences instead of one word at a time (which is really only good for vocabulary). I would like to get some practice, so please feel free to correct me if I choke on grammar. :)

Fuyu ni wa onabe suru de wa iine.
ふゆにはおなべするではいいね。
It's nice to do onabe in the wintertime.
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Posted 11/8/12
I'm not sure if I should go about correcting people or not o.0
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18 / M / anime4fantasy@hot...
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Posted 11/9/12 , edited 11/9/12
Lol what does setsuto mean? and what does namimasu / namiru mean? I have heard it before in an anime. Does it mean to not be under estimated? / Don't under estimate me? And can you please state a short sentence on it onegaishimasu. One with Namimasu and one with namiru.

Could you also please tell me the difference between using namiru and the ichidan verb namimasu? I keep forgetting


I have yet to buy a japanese dictionary -,-

Thanks
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Posted 11/9/12

anime4fantasy wrote:

Lol what does setsuto mean? and what does namimasu / namiru mean? I have heard it before in an anime. Does it mean to not be under estimated? / Don't under estimate me? And can you please state a short sentence on it onegaishimasu. One with Namimasu and one with namiru.

Could you also please tell me the difference between using namiru and the ichidan verb namimasu? I keep forgetting


I have yet to buy a japanese dictionary -,-

Thanks


You've probably heard the word "setsuto" wrong, and unless you put it into context, it's kinda hard for me to try to see what you're trying to say.
Also, it's "nameru" or "namemasu". "Nameru" (舐める)is literally translated to "lick" or "to lick", but it can also mean what you said. I can't think of a better way of translating it anyway. Only way to tell the difference anyway is the context it's been used in, since the intonation is the same(Although now that i think about it, it only seems to be used to mean "underestimate" when it's used in the past tense... hmmm...). To give an example...

僕は今から君の乳首を舐めます。
Boku wa imakara kimi no chikubi wo namemasu.
I will now lick your nipple.

俺のこと舐めてるだろ。
Ore no koto nameterudaro.
You're underestimating me aren't you....

As for telling the difference between nameru and namemasu, I'm not too sure how to explain it since it's just intuitive to me. Someone that has actually learnt the grammar and stuff will probably be able to help you more, but it's sort of to do with the tenses and politeness etc. Not sure how to explain it.

Jeez, I hate it when I suddenly decide I'm gonna help. I write so much and sound like a prick. more than usual anyway.
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Posted 11/9/12
If done in an instructive and constructive spirit, I'm pretty sure most Japanese learners wouldn't mind being corrected or helped. I'll admit I'm just a relative beginner, and am not fluent at all. I may well be making mistakes aplenty, but won't know about it unless someone else mentions it. My conversation partner probably lets a lot of things slide by since to correct me constantly might just take up all the time we have, and it'd be very cumbersome! (If I had an actual professor in an official paid class, however, I'm sure that wouldn't be allowed to pass.)

My understanding of the difference between nameru and namemasu is that it is indeed just a matter of politeness. "Nameru" is the plain form of the verb, to be used between people who know each other. It's also how the verb will be listed in a dictionary. "Namemasu" is the polite form (teineigo), used between relative strangers. Even higher than teineigo is respect language or keigo-- which might go something like: Watakushi wa anata no chikubi wo o-nameitashimasu.
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Posted 11/9/12

sushipath wrote:

If done in an instructive and constructive spirit, I'm pretty sure most Japanese learners wouldn't mind being corrected or helped. I'll admit I'm just a relative beginner, and am not fluent at all. I may well be making mistakes aplenty, but won't know about it unless someone else mentions it. My conversation partner probably lets a lot of things slide by since to correct me constantly might just take up all the time we have, and it'd be very cumbersome! (If I had an actual professor in an official paid class, however, I'm sure that wouldn't be allowed to pass.)

My understanding of the difference between nameru and namemasu is that it is indeed just a matter of politeness. "Nameru" is the plain form of the verb, to be used between people who know each other. It's also how the verb will be listed in a dictionary. "Namemasu" is the polite form (teineigo), used between relative strangers. Even higher than teineigo is respect language or keigo-- which might go something like: Watakushi wa anata no chikubi wo o-nameitashimasu.


My problem most of the time is knowing whether something is actually worth correcting, or whether I'm just being pedantic,if that makes sense lol.

Also, that last sentence. LOL
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18 / M / anime4fantasy@hot...
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Posted 11/9/12

If done in an instructive and constructive spirit, I'm pretty sure most Japanese learners wouldn't mind being corrected or helped. I'll admit I'm just a relative beginner, and am not fluent at all. I may well be making mistakes aplenty, but won't know about it unless someone else mentions it. My conversation partner probably lets a lot of things slide by since to correct me constantly might just take up all the time we have, and it'd be very cumbersome! (If I had an actual professor in an official paid class, however, I'm sure that wouldn't be allowed to pass.)

My understanding of the difference between nameru and namemasu is that it is indeed just a matter of politeness. "Nameru" is the plain form of the verb, to be used between people who know each other. It's also how the verb will be listed in a dictionary. "Namemasu" is the polite form (teineigo), used between relative strangers. Even higher than teineigo is respect language or keigo-- which might go something like: Watakushi wa anata no chikubi wo o-nameitashimasu.


Thanks for the help, I think i get it now
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18 / M / anime4fantasy@hot...
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Posted 11/10/12
Does this make sense?

Oishii kara sushi wa suki desu (I like sushi because it's delicious)
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Posted 11/10/12
日本料理では僕の好物が寿司です。
にほんりょうりではぼくのこうぶつがすしです。
Nihon ryouri de wa boku no koubutsu ga sushi desu.
Among Japanese foods, my favorite is sushi.
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Posted 11/10/12

sushipath wrote:

日本料理では僕の好物が寿司です。
にほんりょうりではぼくのこうぶつがすしです。
Nihon ryouri de wa boku no koubutsu ga sushi desu.
Among Japanese foods, my favorite is sushi.


Im presuming that de wa means 'among' or to do with a selection and koubutsu means 'favourite'. Am i correct? :0

I just can't get my head around when you use the particle 'ga'.
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