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How many of you are studying to go into a scientific or mathematically based industry?
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47 / F / Mid-Atlantic
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Posted 12/1/12

antx0r wrote:

I have a degree in electrical engineering, and it's definitely a lot easier to get a well paying job with a tech degree, even if it's not directly related to your major. It seems almost any job to do with developing new technology, you need at least a master's degree or PhD and several years of experience in the field. Otherwise it's mostly just running, testing and/or fixing existing technology.

Unfortunately there aren't too many people who pursue technical degrees, because of the amount of time and work it takes. People want to party in college and have fun, and it seems that most people prioritize their fun more than their studies, not to mention high schools in the US are woefully poor at preparing people for college level studies.


Thank you precisely the type of feedback I'm looking for.
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Posted 12/1/12

mechajoe wrote:

Bachelor's degree in Computer Science here. Trying my hand at being an indie game developer at the moment. About to release my first game but if that flops, will probably take the first software development job I find.


Cross my fingers for you!!! My favorite game right now is Tokyo Jungle, also a first attempt game and the creator was only a manga artist or writer. Let us know the title when/if you release!
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22 / M / San Francisco Bay...
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Posted 12/1/12
Well, academia isn't an industry per se, so I guess no.

That said, I am studying to become a researcher one day (researching physics), but my studies are still young so who knows what will happen.
MrOhNo 
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Posted 12/2/12

Boganis wrote:


antx0r wrote:

I have a degree in electrical engineering, and it's definitely a lot easier to get a well paying job with a tech degree, even if it's not directly related to your major. It seems almost any job to do with developing new technology, you need at least a master's degree or PhD and several years of experience in the field. Otherwise it's mostly just running, testing and/or fixing existing technology.

Unfortunately there aren't too many people who pursue technical degrees, because of the amount of time and work it takes. People want to party in college and have fun, and it seems that most people prioritize their fun more than their studies, not to mention high schools in the US are woefully poor at preparing people for college level studies.


Thank you precisely the type of feedback I'm looking for.


I disagree to a certain extent with this post. In PA we have some of the best engineering schools in the country. The amount of students entering scientific fields in the state has been increasing for several years. I just don't think such a broad generalization should be made about the amount of students entering the field. I would agree that the number of students seeking to enter a scientific field with a two year degree is increasing as well. And the reason are the amount of time and work it takes to earn a four year degree.
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25 / M / Sydney, Australia
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Posted 12/2/12 , edited 12/2/12
Diagnostic ultrasound is definitely part of science. Science is responsible for all the technology and equipment in hospitals.

I already have a Bachelor of Science in Microbiology. I've been teaching Biology in High School.

But this Christmas, I'm looking forward to working in a Casual Position in a Children's Hospital in the scientific area. So I'm excited.

It was actually hard for me to get into the scientific position, because they expect you to know more than just Biology. You needed to know Clinical Chemistry, Biochemistry, Immunology and Haematology on top of Microbiology.

I'll be working in a position that's not even related to Microbiology. :/
It's more related to Respiratory Science.

The thing is, with a science degree, you can potentially work in any scientific field as long as you have the 1-2 years experience.
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23 / Canada
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Posted 12/2/12
computer engineering has math
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25 / F / Seattle
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Posted 12/3/12
I'm majoring in chemistry, but I'd love to work in stuff that hybridizes science and media. (ie educational material)

I don't know if that counts as a "science industry."
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25 / M / Bakersfield
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Posted 12/3/12
I have dreams of going into synthetic biology. If that doesn't work I would like to go into the philosophy of science
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47 / F / Mid-Atlantic
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Posted 12/7/12 , edited 12/7/12

MrOhNo wrote:


Boganis wrote:


antx0r wrote:

I have a degree in electrical engineering, and it's definitely a lot easier to get a well paying job with a tech degree, even if it's not directly related to your major. It seems almost any job to do with developing new technology, you need at least a master's degree or PhD and several years of experience in the field. Otherwise it's mostly just running, testing and/or fixing existing technology.

Unfortunately there aren't too many people who pursue technical degrees, because of the amount of time and work it takes. People want to party in college and have fun, and it seems that most people prioritize their fun more than their studies, not to mention high schools in the US are woefully poor at preparing people for college level studies.


Thank you precisely the type of feedback I'm looking for.


I disagree to a certain extent with this post. In PA we have some of the best engineering schools in the country. The amount of students entering scientific fields in the state has been increasing for several years. I just don't think such a broad generalization should be made about the amount of students entering the field. I would agree that the number of students seeking to enter a scientific field with a two year degree is increasing as well. And the reason are the amount of time and work it takes to earn a four year degree.


I didn't propose this post as a forum to criticize the U.S. educational system, and I apologize if that was your take. I just stated the fact that the U.S. workforce would require at least a 1/4 of a million scientists/mathematicians (ex. engineers, medical/dental professionals, etc...) to enter the job market within the next five years. When compared to the number of students entering those fields of study in China, Korea, Russia, and India we are falling behind, and I would blame our primary/secondary schools not the universities (although I do have complaints with the universities, they are only responsible for accepting students who really aren't interested in an education).
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20 / M / Canada
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Posted 12/8/12
Currently in First Year and studying Computer Engineering. Its tough but gotta get through it.
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20 / F / L.A.
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Posted 12/8/12
Currently a freshman in college majoring in Biotechnology!
It's still quite early for me to do anything with it I think.
Any tips on what I should start doing now would help!

Also I personally I find college to be quite boring.
There's nothing for me to do cept study!
Plus I don't party, I'd prefer to watch anime instead.
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25 / M / Sydney, Australia
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Posted 12/8/12

kawaiicelia wrote:

Currently a freshman in college majoring in Biotechnology!
It's still quite early for me to do anything with it I think.
Any tips on what I should start doing now would help!

Also I personally I find college to be quite boring.
There's nothing for me to do cept study!
Plus I don't party, I'd prefer to watch anime instead.


Well, in your second year, you should start looking for part time jobs in laboratories related to Biotechnology.

There are companies who look for undergraduate people so they will understand that you need to attend classes and they will be flexible when it comes to that.

The salary will be low of course, but by the time you finish your degree, they might hire you for a better position and it's easier to find a job.
Posted 12/8/12
noo not me am programmer animator cgi artist / architect guess some maths there xd so maybe
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27 / F / California
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Posted 12/8/12
I have my bachelor's degree in biological science (was going to minor in chemistry but had an unfortunate circumstance that prohibited me from taking the final class to receive it as my minor) and right now I'm currently working on getting my MD degree. Hoping to be a pediatrician or possibly go into family medicine...we'll see.
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Posted 5/19/13
Spring forum cleaning! To keep the forums neat and tidy we only keep 6 months worth of threads since its May 19, 2013 [5/19/13] we will keep only keep posts open from December 19, 2012 [12/19/12]. Please feel free to recreate any thread closed, as long as someone else didn't open another similar one before you.
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