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97969 cr points
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26 / F / With Edward and I...
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Posted 12/8/12

sky_maverick wrote:

Art


The Olmec culture was first defined as an art style, and this continues to be the hallmark of the culture.[25] Wrought in a large number of media – jade, clay, basalt, and greenstone among others – much Olmec art, such as The Wrestler, is surprisingly naturalistic. Other art expresses fantastic anthropomorphic creatures, often highly stylized, using an iconography reflective of a religious meaning.[26] Common motifs include downturned mouths and a cleft head, both of which are seen in representations of were-jaguars.[25]

In addition to making human and human-like subjects, Olmec artisans were adept at animal portrayals, for example, the fish vessel to the right or the bird vessel in the gallery below.

While Olmec figurines are found abundantly in sites throughout the Formative Period, the stone monuments such as the colossal heads are the most recognizable feature of Olmec culture.[27] These monuments can be divided into four classes:[28]

Colossal heads;
Rectangular "altars" (more likely thrones) such as Altar 5 shown below;
Free-standing in-the-round sculpture, such as the twins from El Azuzul or San Martin Pajapan Monument 1; and
Stelae, such as La Venta Monument 19 above. The stelae form was generally introduced later than the colossal heads, altars, or free-standing sculptures. Over time, the stelae changed from simple representation of figures, such as Monument 19 or La Venta Stela 1, toward representations of historical events, particularly acts legitimizing rulers. This trend would culminate in post-Olmec monuments such as La Mojarra Stela 1, which combines images of rulers with script and calendar dates.[29]



Why art ?
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Posted 12/8/12

EdwardCullen-BellaCullen wrote:


sky_maverick wrote:

Art


The Olmec culture was first defined as an art style, and this continues to be the hallmark of the culture.[25] Wrought in a large number of media – jade, clay, basalt, and greenstone among others – much Olmec art, such as The Wrestler, is surprisingly naturalistic. Other art expresses fantastic anthropomorphic creatures, often highly stylized, using an iconography reflective of a religious meaning.[26] Common motifs include downturned mouths and a cleft head, both of which are seen in representations of were-jaguars.[25]

In addition to making human and human-like subjects, Olmec artisans were adept at animal portrayals, for example, the fish vessel to the right or the bird vessel in the gallery below.

While Olmec figurines are found abundantly in sites throughout the Formative Period, the stone monuments such as the colossal heads are the most recognizable feature of Olmec culture.[27] These monuments can be divided into four classes:[28]

Colossal heads;
Rectangular "altars" (more likely thrones) such as Altar 5 shown below;
Free-standing in-the-round sculpture, such as the twins from El Azuzul or San Martin Pajapan Monument 1; and
Stelae, such as La Venta Monument 19 above. The stelae form was generally introduced later than the colossal heads, altars, or free-standing sculptures. Over time, the stelae changed from simple representation of figures, such as Monument 19 or La Venta Stela 1, toward representations of historical events, particularly acts legitimizing rulers. This trend would culminate in post-Olmec monuments such as La Mojarra Stela 1, which combines images of rulers with script and calendar dates.[29]



Why art ?


"to answer your question, Ms. Cullen, the Olmecs were very skilled at art and their artwork that they left behind is the main reason we know that this people existed. During this period in history, things like war, social life, and religion were expressed by these peoples by means of things like their stone carvings, wall paintings, jewelry, and so forth. In other words, its one of the most well preserved ways of studying the culture itself."

Creator
97969 cr points
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26 / F / With Edward and I...
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Posted 12/8/12

sky_maverick wrote:


EdwardCullen-BellaCullen wrote:


sky_maverick wrote:

Art


The Olmec culture was first defined as an art style, and this continues to be the hallmark of the culture.[25] Wrought in a large number of media – jade, clay, basalt, and greenstone among others – much Olmec art, such as The Wrestler, is surprisingly naturalistic. Other art expresses fantastic anthropomorphic creatures, often highly stylized, using an iconography reflective of a religious meaning.[26] Common motifs include downturned mouths and a cleft head, both of which are seen in representations of were-jaguars.[25]

In addition to making human and human-like subjects, Olmec artisans were adept at animal portrayals, for example, the fish vessel to the right or the bird vessel in the gallery below.

While Olmec figurines are found abundantly in sites throughout the Formative Period, the stone monuments such as the colossal heads are the most recognizable feature of Olmec culture.[27] These monuments can be divided into four classes:[28]

Colossal heads;
Rectangular "altars" (more likely thrones) such as Altar 5 shown below;
Free-standing in-the-round sculpture, such as the twins from El Azuzul or San Martin Pajapan Monument 1; and
Stelae, such as La Venta Monument 19 above. The stelae form was generally introduced later than the colossal heads, altars, or free-standing sculptures. Over time, the stelae changed from simple representation of figures, such as Monument 19 or La Venta Stela 1, toward representations of historical events, particularly acts legitimizing rulers. This trend would culminate in post-Olmec monuments such as La Mojarra Stela 1, which combines images of rulers with script and calendar dates.[29]



Why art ?


"to answer your question, Ms. Cullen, the Olmecs were very skilled at art and their artwork that they left behind is the main reason we know that this people existed. During this period in history, things like war, social life, and religion were expressed by these peoples by means of things like their stone carvings, wall paintings, jewelry, and so forth. In other words, its one of the most well preserved ways of studying the culture itself."



thank you
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