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Is lying by Omission the same as telling an outright lie?
Posted 12/16/12
Nyaaaaaaaaaaan
Posted 12/16/12 , edited 12/16/12
Trolling is such an overly used term by dumb people. This is how I am, embrace it.
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25 / M / California
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Posted 12/16/12
I personally don't believe that they are the same. True, they are both dishonest if you use them consciously to avoid telling the truth, but not saying something does not mean you are lying. It means you did not want someone to know something, so you said nothing.

Saying something wrong does not necessarily mean you are lying. Not saying anything at all is not necessarily dishonest. It's all about intent.

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25 / M / Kansas, USA
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Posted 12/16/12
Ah. A basement dweller. Gotcha. Thanks.
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29 / M / england
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Posted 12/16/12
Well you've sort of answered your own question by your use of the word "lying", otherwise it would just be omission. So if someone is trying to decieve someone then it is pretty much the same.
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44 / M / Memphis, TN
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Posted 12/16/12
Absolutely not! Omission has nothing whatsoever to do with lying--two different animals. Dishonesty might come into play, but not lying (again, two different animals).
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32 / M / So Cal
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Posted 12/16/12

GayAsianBoy wrote:

It must be, because according to some legal courts proceedings, if you omit a piece of information on purpose, you get the same punishment for lying about something.


Except in cases where the 5th applies. So it mustn't be.
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40 / M
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Posted 12/16/12
I was always taught that 'If you can't say something nice, don't say anything at all'.
I won't lie when asked a direct question, but I see no need to bring up a topic if it will only cause pain.

And in the case in point, I wouldn't have brought it up either. People never appreciate being told their wife is a cheater, especially when true.
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35 / M / Northern California
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Posted 12/16/12

RandeKnight wrote:

I was always taught that 'If you can't say something nice, don't say anything at all'.
I won't lie when asked a direct question, but I see no need to bring up a topic if it will only cause pain.

And in the case in point, I wouldn't have brought it up either. People never appreciate being told their wife is a cheater, especially when true.


You have a point, there. I wouldn't have been happy learning about it, but in hindsight, I also would have been much more sure of myself in allowing things to eventually end with my ex.

It seems to be only after someone's gone from your life that all of the things people wanted to say, but refrained from saying about them come out of the woodwork. Usually, it's justified under something along the lines of "We didn't want to cause you any more drama." or "You seemed happy and willing to make things work." Perfectly valid reasons, depending on how one looks at them. On the other hand, knowing about the issues my ex caused back then would have led to the same result, just a bit sooner, and with a different set of stresses involved.
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32 / M / So Cal
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Posted 12/17/12
For anyone who thinks it's the same, here's a great example for you:

Wife: "Does this make me look fat?" (In this case it does)

Husband: "Are you kidding? You look beautiful." (Omission)
or
Husband: "Yes, but I still think you're beautiful." (Non-omission)

The second answer could take sex that night off the table and hurt her self-confidence.
Posted 12/17/12 , edited 12/17/12
If it's eating you, you might as well voice the lie
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18 / M / Ultimate Super Se...
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Posted 12/17/12
no...that is all
Posted 12/17/12 , edited 12/17/12
A lie is a lie is a lie regardless how it's accomplished.




BearSol wrote:

For anyone who thinks it's the same, here's a great example for you:

Wife: "Does this make me look fat?" (In this case it does)

Husband: "Are you kidding? You look beautiful." (Omission)
or
Husband: "Yes, but I still think you're beautiful." (Non-omission)

The second answer could take sex that night off the table and hurt her self-confidence.


The first one is really more of a dodge than a lie by omission, since you aren't actually omitting anything, you're just being vague.
Depending on the intonation when deliver the line, "Are you kidding?" could be taken as a less explicit denial, which would make
it an outright lie.

The second isn't even a lie.
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22 / M / Colorado
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Posted 12/17/12
Strictly definition wise, omitting information is not lying because lying is intentionally giving false information.
Posted 12/17/12 , edited 12/17/12


Is lying by Omission the same as telling an outright lie?


The subject is pretty explicit that lying is involved.


If it just said omission I'd have to agree, people omit details
all the time. Just imagine how annoying and time consuming
it would be talking to people if we didn't omit anything...
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