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Career Competition x-x
Dragon Mod
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35 / M / OK, USA
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Posted 12/19/12
Be sure to aim for an internship at some point during your last few semesters at school. You can likely get school credit for it, as well as get your name/foot in the door at a local legal group. Even if you're just fetching coffee, that's still more familiarity with the company than a new, random name on a resume pile. I've known a few legal majors who did the internship thing in years past, and all of them ended up with the companies that the interned for, amazingly enough. No guarantee, by any means, of course.
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30 / M
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Posted 12/27/12
Talent always shines through and if you know you are good at something and enjoy it, then have confidence in your skills and yourself.
I'm not in Law but I believe the following applies to all areas:
- build your Network, get into internships and volunteering to meet employers within your field and make sure you introduce yourself and make a positive impact. After which ensure to keep those relationships going. For example see if they will become your mentor. If a role presents itself and your on their contact list you might get contacted about it.
- Get a mentor within the field, for all the best wishes that University Lecturers have they are not always aware of the industry trends. Having a mentor that is currently working within a role you are aiming for will help you gain skills in specific areas where they are lacking in Law, this will help set you aside from the rest of the bunch.

I hope this help and best of luck with your studies!
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18 / M / Cloud Nine
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Posted 12/27/12
If studying law is what you really want to do, then your mind is already made up. No point dropping your passion because another option seems more viable, it will only pain you in the future.
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32 / M / MN
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Posted 12/27/12
As was posted earlier, you should do what you enjoy doing. Make sure that you fully understand what that is. If it changes over the next 8 years of schooling go with your heart (unless it's in the last year, then stick it out).

I would recommended getting a bachelors in something besides or in addition to Pre law. If for whatever reason you can not or choose not to finish you JD (law school degree) you have an actual degree to put on a resume.

A JD will open a lot of doors for you in the business world. Yes there are many people out there with JDs but it's an advanced degree and businesses like to employ people with advanced degrees at good pay (here in MN at least). I've been job hunting and have seen many job postings that would like an MBA or a JD, that are not in the law field.


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Posted 12/27/12 , edited 12/27/12
In reply to coowings "whose to say you will experience the same fate? If you love what you're doing, you must be good at doing it...and being good, how can you not get a job?"

I wish that were true but more times than not, it is not going to be that way. For example i graduated advanced tractor trailer driving school one year ago, and because of my age i have not found a single job that will hire me. I graduated top of my class got my class A CDL and i have a very clean driving record. Their always seems to be a catch with getting any job that requires trade, or college education. I love driving tractor trailers, and i try my hardest to get a job, but until i turn 21 it looks like i will not have a chance at it. What i am trying to say is, its wrong to tell someone that if they love what they do theirs no chance they will not get a job in there field.

My advice is to go to trade school first so you have a career to fall back on if law school does not work out. If you are over 21 i would recommend doing what i did and go for your Class A CDL. After learning to drive one of those nerve racking rigs through a cramped city like pittsburg or any major city, doing law school will seem like a cake walk XD. I was going to college while i was in trade school and at first i would have taken a 50 page paper on any subject as opposed to driving in the city! I am happy though that i stuck with the tractor trailer driving, once i got use to it it felt great to be able to do what use to stress and scare me so much!
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34 / M / ICQ: 114629959
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Posted 12/27/12
The career market has cycles like any other market. So today there might be to many laywers and bakers are missing.
As a logical response many people start a training to become baker. Nearly no one start education to become laywer.
Inferential, after some years we have to many bakers and laywers are missing.

Quintessence: Act anti-cyclic. It may work, or not ^.^
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28 / M
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Posted 12/27/12

SecondLife wrote:

If studying law is what you really want to do, then your mind is already made up. No point dropping your passion because another option seems more viable, it will only pain you in the future.


Disagree.

Well, only if by "more viable" you meant "more likely to maintain a full wallet". Goals and dreams are great, but they don't matter when you're hungry. Fill your wallet first, other things later.
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22 / M / San Francisco Bay...
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Posted 12/27/12 , edited 12/27/12

Koyu wrote:
The only problem is my history professor said that in 2012 there has been an extreme amount of law school graduates, nearly more than jobs available in the United States. With that being said, I know I still have a lot of time before I even think about graduating, but with numbers like that my chances of getting a good career with a law degree are slim to none, do you guys think I should reconsider my major, or just push through and hope for the best?


My brother graduated from Law School (one of the top 5 in the state, actually) and that is the exact problem he is facing. The fact is, law school is so many people's back-up plan, that there are way more lawyers than jobs. It's difficult to break into the field, since law firms want to hire people with work experience, but you can only get work experience if you're hired by law firms (creating a big Catch-22).

Truth be told, nearly every law school graduated has a resounding consensus that law school was a bad idea (racks up a lot of student debt that isn't off-set by the amount of earnings you get with a J.D.). Obviously, it's up to you to make your own decisions, but your history teacher is doing you a favor by informing you that the legal job market is a nightmare right now. However, that begs the question of reconsidering to what? Engineering is by far the only degree I've heard that basically guarantees you a job upon graduation, and computer science to a similar extent. So unless either of those float your boat, then whether or not you should worry about your major is a bigger concern.

Edit: Something else I forgot to mention, a degree does NOT NOT NOT determine your earnings in life. Interneships, networking, volunteer work--anything that provides any sort of skill can be integral to entering the workforce. Too many people feel like a college degree provides them with all those skills, when in reality it's just an avenue to gaining those skills as well as a prerequisite to be certified. The fact a law degree is required to even be a lawyer in the first place makes it already unspectacular by itself--so interships, past relevant job experience, networks, and any other avenue of experience are what you are going to need to rely on to make yourself stand out. This applies for far more than the legal market, and arguably, anywhere you end up.
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32 / M / MN
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Posted 12/27/12

Zoraprime wrote:

Edit: Something else I forgot to mention, a degree does NOT NOT NOT determine your earnings in life. Interneships, networking, volunteer work--anything that provides any sort of skill can be integral to entering the workforce. Too many people feel like a college degree provides them with all those skills, when in reality it's just an avenue to gaining those skills as well as a prerequisite to be certified. The fact a law degree is required to even be a lawyer in the first place makes it already unspectacular by itself--so interships, past relevant job experience, networks, and any other avenue of experience are what you are going to need to rely on to make yourself stand out. This applies for far more than the legal market, and arguably, anywhere you end up.


+1 big time. A degree will open doors for you, but you still have to prove your worth to get ahead.
Sailor Candy Moderator
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Posted 5/29/13
Spring forum cleaning! To keep the forums neat and tidy we only keep 6 months worth of threads since its May 29, 2013 [5/29/13] we will keep only keep posts open from December 29, 2012 [12/29/12]. Please feel free to recreate any thread closed, as long as someone else didn't open another similar one before you.
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