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What is the world view on canadians?
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Posted 1/6/13
They like Hockey way too much, and they say "Eh?" and "Abooot" a lot.
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Posted 1/6/13

papagolfwhiskey wrote:


aurora-chanxx wrote:

Sorry. I just learned that! That's totally cool! I'm West coast. We have cartons here. I think it's super awesome that even though one can live in Canada, depending on where, it's almost like a different country! I've never been to that side, so I was speaking out of total ignorance. My bad :)


No need to apologise. I thought everyone drank out of bags. just because I did. So we are the same.

So.. the real question: Labbat's or Molson's

or do you drink REAL beer?

and. Are you a Canucks fan. or are you rarity? (Myself I'm a Montreal Fan in Toronto... yeesh!)




Coors light hahaha! But Molson is my second!!! And Flames all the way!!! Canucks, blech!
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Posted 1/6/13 , edited 1/6/13

aurora-chanxx wrote:



Coors light hahaha! But Molson is my second!!! And Flames all the way!!! Canucks, blech!


Mmmm.. Coors light. AKA sex in a canoe.

the Flames. Where are they now? Calgary still have them?

I remember when they were an Atlanta team. (hence the Flames. From the burning there of during the American Civil War)


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19 / F / amissum
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Posted 1/6/13
I went to visit Canada--and minus the select few people who were extremely rude to me because I didn't know French during my stay in Montreal, it was lovely. Other people were quite kind. Their direction-giving was superb?
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Posted 1/7/13

EnoughToHurt wrote:

I went to visit Canada--and minus the select few people who were extremely rude to me because I didn't know French during my stay in Montreal, it was lovely. Other people were quite kind. Their direction-giving was superb?


Just out of curiosity, what age where the 'rude' people?



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Posted 1/7/13 , edited 1/7/13

papagolfwhiskey wrote:


EnoughToHurt wrote:

I went to visit Canada--and minus the select few people who were extremely rude to me because I didn't know French during my stay in Montreal, it was lovely. Other people were quite kind. Their direction-giving was superb?


Just out of curiosity, what age where the 'rude' people?





They couldn't have been younger than 35. I was trying to ask for directions. They spoke English, but they asked me repeatedly why I was in Montreal if I couldn't speak French, rather than actually give me directions. But the other couple I met was quite nice. Wonderful directions. Kind. So I mean, I wasn't really speaking against Canadians in general. (':
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Posted 1/7/13

EnoughToHurt wrote:


papagolfwhiskey wrote:


EnoughToHurt wrote:

I went to visit Canada--and minus the select few people who were extremely rude to me because I didn't know French during my stay in Montreal, it was lovely. Other people were quite kind. Their direction-giving was superb?


Just out of curiosity, what age where the 'rude' people?





They couldn't have been younger than 35. I was trying to ask for directions. They spoke English, but they asked me repeatedly why I was in Montreal if I couldn't speak French, rather than actually give me directions. But the other couple I met was quite nice. Wonderful directions. Kind. So I mean, I wasn't really speaking against Canadians in general. (':


About what I guessed.

You have to understand. Quebeccers in the 1960s and 70s compared themselves with SOME justice to the contemporary blacks of the Deep South. Maudit Anglais, (Cursed English) controlled all the jobs, much of the education systems etc. and thought they were perfectly justified in treating Francophones as a 'conquered people' a full 200+ years after General Montcalm's defeat on the Plains of Abraham.

Their 'Quiet Revolution' turned that situation on it's ear, So much so, that modern Quebeccers don't feal like second class citizens any more and feel as if they have control of their province's destiny. They used to complain that they weren't "Maitre chez Nous" (Masters of our own house) but that has been no longer true for nearly a generation.

Still some Quebeccers my age and older have a chip on their shoulder. It's not nice, and it's unfair to you an innocent tourist. but it's also understandable.


An old Joke from Quebec.

What do you call a Canadian who speaks three languages? Trilingual

What do you call a Canadian who speaks two languages? Bilingual

What do you call a Canadian who speaks only one Language? English.


The other change in the last 30 years or so is that we are on the whole, especially in our big cities. (like Montreal) a much more culturally diverse and cosmopolitan populace than we used to be. The victim card doesn't play well with immigrants from say... Haiti. And it's hard to point fingers at 'the English' when so much of the rest of Canada patently ... Isn't.
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Posted 1/7/13

_Jurnee_ wrote:

Jeez, I'm Canadian and I've never heard of bagged milk...I keep thinking of breasts.
But anyway...it's cool here. Hah


This is the first time I have heard about bagged milk myself! Guess it's not country wide? lol
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Posted 1/7/13
Wondering how far it does spread. So far it's in Ontario and Quebec. What about the east coast?

we know also that it doesn't extend as far west as Alberta, nor leap frog to BC.

Is it in Manitoba? Saskatchewan? Inquiring minds want to know.
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Posted 1/7/13 , edited 1/7/13

BeeSlab wrote:


_Jurnee_ wrote:

Jeez, I'm Canadian and I've never heard of bagged milk...I keep thinking of breasts.
But anyway...it's cool here. Hah


This is the first time I have heard about bagged milk myself! Guess it's not country wide? lol


Bagged milk used be sold along side cartons and jugs in Western Canada but it went away sometimes in the 1990s. I used to see it in stores as a kid. I grew up in BC to be specific. I remember my grandparents in Alberta used to get bottled milk from a milk man then too o.o
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23 / M / Pluto
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Posted 1/7/13
you can transfer your canadian drivers license to a japanese drivers license ...nuff said
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24 / M / Guess
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Posted 1/7/13 , edited 1/7/13

papagolfwhiskey wrote:


Party discipline is all that keeps a government in power. However we have regional forces at work. Most of Canada (population wise) is clustered around the shores of the St. Laurence Seaway and Lake Ontario. Which means the rest of Canada is stuck with whatever Montreal and Toronto agree on. (which fortunately isn't much) This leads to Western Alienation.

Quebec tends to vote as a Block. and strategic voting is the norm. It's commonly asked in Quebec "Did you win your vote" meaning did you vote for whomever got into government. Quebec also has it's own issues with federal provincial relations and it's own history that make it's status with the rest of Canada .. Distinct...



So, if I understand you correctly, Quebec usually vote en masse for a party to represent their regional interest on a national level, such as promoting French, protecting Quebecois culture, but, doesn't Quebec have its own National Assembly to take care of Regional Issues, with a certain amount of devolution, as with Westminster and Holyrood?



The Current conservative party is ... can be viewed as.... an usurpation of the ancient Tory brand by a regional right wing party that finally got it's way after 10 years of efforts to 'unite the right'. It's economic policies are attributed to think tanks out of the universities in Alberta and is still seen by some as the old Reform Party in new clothes.

The Liberal party of Canada has been the traditional government party more often than not ever since the fallout from the Riel Rebelions in 1885 alienated Quebec against the government party of the time (conservatives). It's a centrist party that steals planks freely from our conservatives and social democrats alike. There have been times thanks to Western Alienation that it hasn't held a seat west of Winnipeg. However, it's relevance may be in question. Our Government is right wing. Our opposition is Social Democrat and the Liberal party is neither for the first time in... forever. A consequence of a series of weak party leaders selected more for their lack of offensiveness to the party's internal Kingmakers than any ability to lead. In itself a consequence of Liberal Party arrogance bred of nearly a century of being the Government with brief interludes of Official Opposition status.


Forgive me for putting this in American perspective, but the Conservative Party and the Liberal Party seem to me analogous with the Republican Party and Democratic Party here respectively, in this manner: The Conservative Party is a national party usurped by a regional interest, just as our Republican Party is a national party that overwhelmingly reflects American Southern and Midwestern interest- zeal in Jesus, anti-Gay marriage, guns, overt or covert racism. etc. and the Democratic Party is like the Liberal Party in that it is a centrist-right party that is not afraid to steal their platform and affect the same zeal in Jesus, ride on the same anti-Gay, pro-gun frevor of their Republican brothers, the only difference being that the Liberal Party is the dominant party of Canada while Democrats spend most of their time out of power, and, when in power, bickering amongst each other, stabbing each other in the back, and then falling out of grace and power again.



The New Democratic Party, are our social democrats, They too interestingly enough, came out of the west in the 1930s. This is the first time they've been anything other than a voice in the wilderness. The 'third party' that can spoil plans and keep governments honest but never really a contender in it's own right. They have traditionally crippled by the fact that the Parti Quebequois and it's federal affiliate the Bloc Quecbequois are also social democrats and tend to suck up all the Quebec votes that might go to the NDP. (Although they made inroads in the last election)

The Bloc Quebequois is a true regional party. Formed (like Reform) in the meltdown of the Progressive Conservatives after a really unpopular conservative prime minister in the 80's. They go to parliament to make sure Quebec's interests are served and command a respectable number of seats.


So.. yes... Regional differences are a HUGE part of federal politics.




The Bloc Québécois seems more or less the Parti Québécois, only that it commands seats on a national level, much like the SNP in Scotland, which commands a respectable number of seats in Holyrood, but not so many in Westminster- but, to the point, am I wrong to summarise the situation in Canada so:

The parties are national, and usually tend to have strong party discipline, these parties represent regional interest (The Progressive Conservative Western Interests and the Bloc Québécois the interest of Quebec), and so, uses the power of their party, gained from a National Election, to grant favours to their respective regions and interests.
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longfenglim wrote:

.



longfenglim wrote:
So, if I understand you correctly, Quebec usually vote en masse for a party to represent their regional interest on a national level, such as promoting French, protecting Quebecois culture, but, doesn't Quebec have its own National Assembly to take care of Regional Issues, with a certain amount of devolution, as with Westminster and Holyrood?


The Provincial parliament has a lot of power. (or the 'national assembly' as it is called in Quebec) and Each province can run it's own affairs on a lot of issues. Prior to the 1980's Quebec tended to vote universally Liberal which meant the PCs only got into power whenever EVERYONE but Quebec voted for the Tories. Usually to their regret. (the Last Time it happened was under Diefenbaker)

In the 1980s the Progressive Conservatives (so named due to a merger between the old conservatives and the progressive party) put forward a leader who was charming in both official languages had a reasonably handsome face and deep voice and who could lead. They trounced the Liberals who were floundering after Pierre Trudeau retired (another famous charismatic leader) and who were still in bad graces with the west for imposing a 'national energy policy' that scuttled some important deals in the nascent Tar Sands and made Alberta's oil, Canada's resource. Thanks to Mulrooney (the New PC leader) being even more charismatic in French than he was in English they made HUGE inroads into Quebec.

And managed within 8 years to completely alienate the entire country and make former PM Brian Mulroney one of the most hated men in Canada for that generation.

my memory is a little fuzzy here but the PC were reduced over the next two elections to so few seats they risked losing their official party status. The hard Core Alberta for Albertans within the party broke off and became part of the nucleous of the Reform Party. Which swept in with all sorts of populist planks like an elected senate and the ability to recall your member of parliament. But in the end it was a more right wing version of the party than ever.

The Disaffected Quebeccers from the collapsing PCs did a number of things. One of which was form the Bloc Quebeqois a party which abandons all pretense of being anything other than a party supporting the naked self interests of Quebec. while often Allied with the PQ it's NOT NECESSARILY a socialist party. Many of it's members (at first at least) were former conservatives.

One of many leaders the PCs cycled through didn't join the Bloc and instead ended up being the leader of the Quebec provincial Liberal Party and was the Premier of Quebec until the last provincial election.

Reform meanwhile made into Official opposition a couple of times but could never muster enough seats to challenge about 12 years of Liberal Majority governments under one of Trudeau's former Cabinet ministers. (In essence we've been living under the shadow of Trudeau since the 1960's and now is son is making a bid for the Liberal Leadership)

Efforts to 'unite the right' caused reform to basically rename itself a couple of times. (My favourite was the Conservative Reform Alliance Party- C.R.A.P. -- this was actually on the ballot during one of their televised conventions until some back bencher put his hand and said 'uh.. Guys?) Finally it became the Alliance party under the man who would become our current PM. He basically staged a hostile takeover of the rump of the PCs renamed the new party simply the Conservative Pary, allienated or marginalised all the 'Red Tories' and other centrists within his party and basically set Canada down the road towards a polarized two party system. (fortunately we haven't hit the end of that road)


longfenglim wrote:
Forgive me for putting this in American perspective, but the Conservative Party and the Liberal Party seem to me analogous with the Republican Party and Democratic Party here respectively, in this manner: The Conservative Party is a national party usurped by a regional interest, just as our Republican Party is a national party that overwhelmingly reflects American Southern and Midwestern interest- zeal in Jesus, anti-Gay marriage, guns, overt or covert racism. etc. and the Democratic Party is like the Liberal Party in that it is a centrist-right party that is not afraid to steal their platform and affect the same zeal in Jesus, ride on the same anti-Gay, pro-gun frevor of their Republican brothers, the only difference being that the Liberal Party is the dominant party of Canada while Democrats spend most of their time out of power, and, when in power, bickering amongst each other, stabbing each other in the back, and then falling out of grace and power again.


As far as it goes and relative to Canadian politics yes it is a good analogy. You must remember though that our PCs were more like conservative Democrats and while Current PM and conservative leader Steven Harper is big admiring of the Republicans he's had to soft pedal some of his social agenda and work from the margins. so much so that somethimes his 'base' complains that he has sold out. (I don't think so myself. I think Harper is a 'true believer' and find the current conservatives to be actively undermining our democratic rights and institutions)

The Liberals do their share of infighting too. oh boy do they ever. it's one of the reasons they're in such a pickle now. Chretien (Trudeau's disciple) was actively ousted by Martin, who was in turn scuttled by easter egg scandals left by Chretien. Martin was followed by a series of weak leaders whom I believe were selected more for the lack of offense they represented to the factionalised kingmakers of the party rather than any attempt to find someone they could rally behind and win with. They were too used to being the party in power. this is an historic government for them Neither the Government NOR the Opposition. However they aren't bible thumping or anti-gay. mind you ... our biggest non catholic christian denomination (The United Church of Canada) campaigned in FAVOUR of our gay marriage and divorce legislation back when we settled that debate at least a decade ago. The liberals were even considering decriminalizing marjuana .. until the US leaned on us. They are our centrist party but they are probably to the LEFT of most Democrats.

Also. There has almost always been a multiparty dynamic in Canada. Yes we still have two parties that claim the inheritance and nicknames of Tories and Grits (Conservative and Liberal) but we've had third fourth and fifth parties with seats in the Commons and real coalition power for most of the last 2 decades and off and on throughout our history. So it's a fair analogy.. but only so far.


longfenglim wrote:

The Bloc Québécois seems more or less the Parti Québécois, only that it commands seats on a national level, much like the SNP in Scotland, which commands a respectable number of seats in Holyrood, but not so many in Westminster- but, to the point, am I wrong to summarise the situation in Canada so:

The parties are national, and usually tend to have strong party discipline, these parties represent regional interest (The Progressive Conservative Western Interests and the Bloc Québécois the interest of Quebec), and so, uses the power of their party, gained from a National Election, to grant favours to their respective regions and interests
.


Ummm again .. yes an no. the Conservatives are national and derived from a regional interest. but you can't have a majority government (which the conservative have) without appealing to more than a regional base.

The BQ and the PQ are allied but not always necessarily on the same page vis a vis. Right or left. however Quebec is one of our most Left wing provinces on a lot of issues. BQ contenders no which side of their bread has the butter. Also the BQ and the PQ are not necessarily in power at the same time. and sometimes (should the provincial Liberals control the Assembly) they find themselves in bed with the Quebec Liberals when asserting Quebec's .. rights.. and opposing them when discussing national policies that have less to do with Quebec sovereignty and more to do with standard party planks. Just like right now. The PQ are in power but with a minority. Which is a message that Quebec is fed up with the Liberals (former incumbents) but doesn't want another referendum on separation either.

Where philosphy ends and regional interests begin is difficult to determine at times. Harper and his conservatives are pro business. and pro oil sands. (This does make them popular in Alberta but...) Is Gutting our ecological watchdogs a regional move or a conservative move?











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21 / F / philippines
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Posted 1/7/13
I used to think of canadians that they have red hair, eye glasses and have kind of curly/wavy hair. I dunno maybe because I havent seen a canadian yet? I also imagine Canada from Hetalia.
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Most of the canadians I've met seem very relaxed
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