First  Prev  1  2  3  Next  Last
Request for ketchup on a Philly cheesesteak, leads to fight in Subway shop
keekk1 
21182 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
16 / F / Florida
Offline
Posted 1/3/13
I've ordered a Philly cheese steak before, and asked for it with no cheese. I afterwords put ketchup on it. I realize it defeated the purpose of a "cheese" steak, but it tasted good.
Posted 1/3/13
Clearly both of them are having a bad day which it might not gotten that way if one of them chose to just let it slide.
Most fights nowadays are caused by just a misunderstanding and stressful aggressive response so sad.
As a employee in a food establishment i think he should just respected the customer.

42361 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
26 / M / Alaska
Offline
Posted 1/4/13 , edited 1/4/13
I used to work as a cashier at a small gas station. The corporate policy basically said customer is king, kiss their ass.
The store manager however, held another view point. If anybody started giving lip, and became irrational and would not calm down, tell them to leave. They start being wise asses? Tell them to leave. If they disrespect you? Tell them to leave.

One instance, I had this young man, probably late teens early 20's come into the store. There was 1 customer at the register, 2 others behind that person. Man becomes the third in line. I am doing stocking, cleaning, the basic day to day stuff. Kid starts hollering at me to get at the register to help out my co-worker, I told him he isn't going to wait long, and I don't go to assist unless there is at least 5 people in line (keep in mind, gas station lines don't last long, usually about 10-15 seconds long for cash gas purchases. 30 -1 min for for CC purchases. )

This kid starts scoffing and starting up a whine fest. 2 more customers come in, and get in Line, so I go to the register and and specifically call the kid over, instead of next person in line. At this point, I was still going to process his purchase, but as he was walking to the register, going "Finally!" and made a smart ass remark. Started taking his items while he was checking out the lighter rack, then when he looked back and tossed the light on a now empty counter, I picked up the lighter and told him the store is refusing to make a sale to him and he needs to leave. The look on his face was like shock, and a little bit of whiney face going on. As he left the 3 men that were in front of him just busted out laughing. The 2 new customers where going like, "Wtf did I just walk into?"

The store lost of lot of assholes, but at the same time we gained lots of regulars because word spread, respect is given as taken.
The corporate guys hated is and made demands that we start following the policy. But the boss man, he always stood firm about the whole respect deal. With sales increasing due to the higher regulars, he kept his job.
16193 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
20 / M / Norway, Oslo
Offline
Posted 1/4/13
Well if the weirdo wants ketchup then no one should stop him.
5028 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
29 / M / So Cal
Offline
Posted 1/4/13
Putting ketchup on a Philly cheesesteak is a sin in some places. The customer should've been arrested.
40416 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
23 / M
Offline
Posted 1/4/13 , edited 1/4/13
Haha, Subway doesn't carry Ketchup. It's not like the employee was refusing to put ketchup on because of taste or something. SUBWAY JUST DOESN'T HAVE ANY KETCHUP. In order to comply with the request, the employee would need to go to the grocery store, pick up some ketchup, and then come back, which is ridiculous for a minimum wage employee, and ridiculous as a business strategy. If Subway bought ketchup, IT WOULD GO BAD BEFORE IT COULD BE USED. They lose money by carrying it, because almost nobody wants to put ketchup on a fucking turkey sandwich.

The employee probably didn't know how to explain this to the guy, and the guy took it as a personal insult, possibly thinking that he was denied ketchup out of spite. I dislike people that think the customer is always right, especially customers that think the customer is always right. I've found that with most people though, if you just explain to them the reason that they're wrong, they either understand and accept it, or they get pissed off and leave. In the extreme cases, we have a customer that gets into a fight over ketchup.

To the OP, this has nothing to do with freedom, as the customer is free to go elsewhere if he is infuriated by a lack of ketchup. Remember that businesses are free to offer whatever condiments they want if they can stay in business. If you want ketchup at Subway, either get your own, or start a campaign to promote ketchup on philly-cheesesteak sandwiches. Subway does just fine -- even better than fine -- without offering ketchup.
40416 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
23 / M
Offline
Posted 1/4/13 , edited 1/4/13


It is the company's policy to not offer ketchup. Subway does not consider ketchup within reason, so they don't carry it. The article you posted verifies that. The employee was acting in accordance with the company policy of not offering ketchup. The employee was right in this respect, although perhaps he was wrong to reciprocate the customer's (probably) irrational behavior. See my above post for further reasons that you are wrong.
50588 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
26 / M / Sydney, Australia
Offline
Posted 1/4/13 , edited 1/4/13
I just find a lot of retail/food services incompetent. That's why whenever I'm at a supermarket, I use the self-checkout machines. I hate interacting with people and I want to interact with them as minimal as possible.


Like one time, I walked into this inn, and the boss yelled, "What do you want?"... what kind of... language is that? Instead of asking, "How can I help you?"... it's "WHAT DO YOU WANT?"

I've never worked in hospitality, but I know that how you approach a customer can make or break the business.


I'm very sensitive to people's tone/behaviour, if I feel even a bit of hostility, I just leave the premise and go somewhere else where I can feel comfortable.
4536 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
21 / M / Missouri
Offline
Posted 1/4/13
Ketchup? ON a Philly Cheesesteak?

OH HELL NO!

Justice was served.
137308 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
25 / F / Georgia
Offline
Posted 1/4/13
Hmm, I don't think Subway has ever carried ketchup. But then again, I have not step foot in one in a very long time. According to the story, little is told about who started the argument, but the employee is mainly at fault if he really made death threats. My first thought was who argues over some condiment? How ignorant can you be dude?

I would have told the customer that we don't have any ketchup, but I can make you the sandwich and you can put some on when you buy it from inside the Wal-Mart. People make things so complicated, sheesh.
MrOhNo 
20153 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
26 / M / Philly Suburbs
Offline
Posted 1/4/13

Should not our choices also be free?


Our choices are free. We have the freedom to choose what businesses we support and which one we don't. In a free market the business is also free to determine what goods it offers. Subway does not have a monopoly in the food service industry. The customer easily could have gone to another establishment.

In this case the employee should have been fired, regardless of who was right in the argument. This is because he was clearly creating a hostile environment for customers and coworkers; which no one has the right to do. The employee also had no right to prevent the customer from leaving. He should have been arrested for unlawfully detaining the customer.
28133 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
28 / M / Toledo
Offline
Posted 1/4/13
After looking into it more, and I have no idea why I did, the subway franchisee is the one who decides if ketchup is carried or not and so some subways will have it and some won't. This one clearly didn't but the whole thing has a lot of holes in information and logic. It seems both people were having a bad day to even get into the argument. On top of that the article says that the subway worker felt there was a gun threat and so he moved out from behind the counter to block the customer from leaving. I don't know about anyone else but it doesn't make sense to me to get in the way of a person you feel threatened by and that you believe has a gun. Blocking the customer even without any kind of threats being made doesn't even make sense though. Since it was also the customer who had to call 911 it seems the employee was even more to blame for things going as badly as they did but there is way too little information to really tell at this point.
5311 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
40 / M
Offline
Posted 1/4/13
They could have asked for A1 and the problem could have been resolved.
15276 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
28 / M / Bay Area CA
Offline
Posted 1/4/13
"Would you like ketchup with your Italian BMT sub sir?"

"Why yes I would thank you!"

Things never heard in Subway ever.
20399 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
34 / M
Offline
Posted 1/4/13

justanotherguy_2005 wrote:
On top of that the article says that the subway worker felt there was a gun threat and so he moved out from behind the counter to block the customer from leaving. I don't know about anyone else but it doesn't make sense to me to get in the way of a person you feel threatened by and that you believe has a gun. Blocking the customer even without any kind of threats being made doesn't even make sense though.
The only thing I can think of is maybe the customer made some vague threat and headed for his car, and the employee thought he was going to get a gun from his car. From what I gather about Florida laws you can legally carry firearms in your vehicle.

First  Prev  1  2  3  Next  Last
You must be logged in to post.