First  Prev  64  65  66  67  68  69  70  71  72  73  74  75  76  77  78  79  80  Next  Last
Post Reply Chihayafuru 2 Discussions
33717 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
24 / M / on your lap, purring
Offline
Posted 12/8/13 , edited 12/9/13
I've just received a small booklet that is fairly easy to follow for English speakers. It even has a small section in moderately well translated English that explains Karuta quite nicely. The best thing about it is that it has pictures of all shimo-no-ku (the 2nd halves of the poems that the players lay out on the field) on a page, and then on the reverse side of the page it has the kami-no-ku (the first half that the reader speaks out loud). For the kami-no-ku it also has the kamariji highlighted in red so you know which syllables make a card unique.

Here's an example:
Front of page shimo-no-ku



Back of page kami-no-ku


And for anyone who knows Japanese characters very well, I do have a question. In the kami-no-ku link the two poems that start with "AWARE" and "AWAZI", their second hiragana character for the "WA" looks like the character for "HA" instead. Is this some sort of exceptional case or something?

BTW: This is the vendor I bought the booklet from (http://www.ebay.com/itm/Hyakunin-Isshu-Kyogi-Karuta-Japanese-Kimariji-memorization-for-English-200015-/231106827097?pt=Vintage_Antique_Toys_US&hash=item35cf0a5359)



If anyone has found any other useful materials such as this then please post them! I've seen this CR news topic http://www.crunchyroll.com/anime-news/2013/11/06/video-learn-to-play-karuta-with-chihayafuru-cards

Does anyone know where you can get this yet?




36365 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
42 / F / USA
Offline
Posted 12/8/13

sweetfireflower wrote:

Printable copies of the 100 grabbing cards. I'll probably write the decisive syllables on them like "chiha" on the chihayaburu card to practice xD And laminate them.
http://www.karuta.org/data/image.html
And I found a pdf that lists all poems in romanji organized by deciding syllable and a picture of the corresponding card.
http://www.karuta.ca/stream/image/readingcardslist.pdf


I am reposting this since the one set I use is the last one (reading card set). I have to print the translations since that's the only thing that's missing from the reading list.. but I LOVE how that one pdf file is written. It has the pauses and where the 2nd verse starts (and which you ultimately have to pick up. I.. keep it around when I'm watching the show.
53209 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
42 / M / Canada
Offline
Posted 12/9/13

meygaera wrote:

I've just received a small booklet that is fairly easy to follow for English speakers. It even has a small section in moderately well translated English that explains Karuta quite nicely. The best thing about it is that it has pictures of all shimo-no-ku (the 2nd halves of the poems that the players lay out on the field) on a page, and then on the reverse side of the page it has the kami-no-ku (the first half that the reader speaks out loud). For the kami-no-ku it also has the kamariji highlighted in red so you know which syllables make a card unique.

Here's an example:
Front of page shimo-no-ku (http://img1.ak.crunchyroll.com/i/spire4/206812db9881f05b928d08f52929a5591386557996_full.png)
Back of page kami-no-ku (http://img1.ak.crunchyroll.com/i/spire1/4f2120176b84dc6be8beb07bd3a0255b1386557999_full.png)

And for anyone who knows Japanese characters very well, I do have a question. In the kami-no-ku link the two poems that start with "AWARE" and "AWAZI", their second hiragana character for the "WA" looks like the character for "HA" instead. Is this some sort of exceptional case or something?

BTW: This is the vendor I bought the booklet from (http://www.ebay.com/itm/Hyakunin-Isshu-Kyogi-Karuta-Japanese-Kimariji-memorization-for-English-200015-/231106827097?pt=Vintage_Antique_Toys_US&hash=item35cf0a5359)

If anyone has found any other useful materials such as this then please post them! I've seen this CR news topic http://www.crunchyroll.com/anime-news/2013/11/06/video-learn-to-play-karuta-with-chihayafuru-cards

Does anyone know where you can get this yet?
Wa and Ha in romaji are one of the reasons why Japanese learners should really learn hiragana first IMO. The pronunciation is correct in romaji but the spelling in hiragana.

It is the particle WA which is written は but pronounced WA always. In words, は is pronounced HA, never like わ WA. The pronunciation change without a spelling change is one of the quirks of Japanese. But it means that it is difficult to blindly recite a string of hiragana. Unless you know Japanese enough to know words from particles, you will pronounce it incorrectly.

Normally, romaji is spaced like English so you can artificially see the word boundaries. Japanese has no such spacing.

I have not yet seen the new Chihayafuru card set for sale anywhere even though the release date is Friday.
33717 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
24 / M / on your lap, purring
Offline
Posted 12/13/13
Just arrived.
36365 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
42 / F / USA
Offline
Posted 12/13/13
Oh. the cards aren't numbered.. I'd be totally screwed
88146 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
23 / M / This Dying World
Offline
Posted 12/13/13

meygaera wrote:

Just arrived.


what are the card materials made of?

I'd assume it is a hard polymer?
53209 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
42 / M / Canada
Offline
Posted 12/13/13
I love the volume 23 cover!


And volume 4 of the middle school novel!
7098 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
18 / M
Offline
Posted 12/13/13
I find it interesting that the romanised versions of the hiragana cards are wrong in many instances.

This is from reading the hiragana myself.

eg. Shima has been romanised as sima and the fu character being never romanised right.

Many other mistakes are also there.

53209 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
42 / M / Canada
Offline
Posted 12/13/13

Jacktenstar wrote:

I find it interesting that the romanised versions of the hiragana cards are wrong in many instances.

This is from reading the hiragana myself.

eg. Shima has been romanised as sima and the fu character being never romanised right.

Many other mistakes are also there.
Romaji is no good really... though sima or shima, and fu or hu is a bit academic. しま、ふ much simpler... no way to get them wrong in hiragana.
36365 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
42 / F / USA
Offline
Posted 12/13/13

hpulley wrote:


Jacktenstar wrote:

I find it interesting that the romanised versions of the hiragana cards are wrong in many instances.

This is from reading the hiragana myself.

eg. Shima has been romanised as sima and the fu character being never romanised right.

Many other mistakes are also there.
Romaji is no good really... though sima or shima, and fu or hu is a bit academic. しま、ふ much simpler... no way to get them wrong in hiragana.


I'm permanently screwed because I look at the numbers and look for 17 whenever I hear Chiha..
53209 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
42 / M / Canada
Offline
Posted 12/14/13

Arsenette wrote:


hpulley wrote:


Jacktenstar wrote:

I find it interesting that the romanised versions of the hiragana cards are wrong in many instances.

This is from reading the hiragana myself.

eg. Shima has been romanised as sima and the fu character being never romanised right.

Many other mistakes are also there.
Romaji is no good really... though sima or shima, and fu or hu is a bit academic. しま、ふ much simpler... no way to get them wrong in hiragana.


I'm permanently screwed because I look at the numbers and look for 17 whenever I hear Chiha..

Why permanently? Retrain.... When you hear ちはやぶる you need to look for からくれな. That's all... Hiragana is the best, it is what will always be there in a real set of karuta cards. Not numbers! And not romaji...
36365 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
42 / F / USA
Offline
Posted 12/14/13 , edited 12/14/13

hpulley wrote:
Why permanently? Retrain.... When you hear ちはやぶる you need to look for からくれな. That's all... Hiragana is the best, it is what will always be there in a real set of karuta cards. Not numbers! And not romaji...


They still look like squiggly lines to me..
53209 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
42 / M / Canada
Offline
Posted 12/14/13 , edited 12/14/13
EDIT: 淡路 is indeed あわじ and it is a special case for karuta that it is written あはじ。 Normally it is written あわじ. This is not the exception I mentioned above where WATASHI WA is normally written わたしは because the は is a particle which is pronounced わ. This is a special case of karuta Japanese being very old. Confirmed by listening to the CD that comes with the Chihayaburu set, it is pronounced AWAJI, not AHAJI. The 'mistake' is the old way of writing the hiragana for it but the kanji on the reader's card is correct, the furigana shows the old way of writing it. Japanese is fun...


Arsenette wrote:


hpulley wrote:
Why permanently? Retrain.... When you hear ちはやぶる you need to look for からくれな. That's all... Hiragana is the best, it is what will always be there in a real set of karuta cards. Not numbers! And not romaji...


They still look like squiggly lines to me..
Memorize and use the 48 characters of the hiragana set and you will no longer see squiggly lines and will be on your way to reading karuta cards. But I suppose it is not for everyone. I found hiragana very easy and quick to pick up:
33717 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
24 / M / on your lap, purring
Offline
Posted 12/14/13 , edited 12/14/13
I"ve started to learn most of them so far. I usually test myself by picking up a japanese manga and see how far I can get before running into some weird Kanji. In some mangas that won't be for a few pages, others it will happen in every word bubble. What I don't get so far is how the grammar works. And also, even if I can read a word, I don't necessarily know what it means.

I agree with hpulley, that learning the hiragana first will help so much in memorizing which poems go with which cards. You don't need to memorize the entire poems. At first I did try to memorize every combination like "Ok this sound goes with the card that has these squigly lines on them and this sound that sounds really similar goes with this card that has some funky U shape with a dash on it". That requires a lot more memorization and it is difficult for the brain to convert that into muscle memory than already familiarizing oneself with the characters. Both ways do take time but in the end you at least know hiragana.



AnimeKami wrote:

what are the card materials made of?

I'd assume it is a hard polymer?


Pretty much, they also look a lot smaller in person.
53209 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
42 / M / Canada
Offline
Posted 12/14/13 , edited 12/14/13

meygaera wrote:

I"ve started to learn most of them so far. I usually test myself by picking up a japanese manga and see how far I can get before running into some weird Kanji. In some mangas that won't be for a few pages, others it will happen in every word bubble. What I don't get so far is how the grammar works. And also, even if I can read a word, I don't necessarily know what it means.

I agree with hpulley, that learning the hiragana first will help so much in memorizing which poems go with which cards. You don't need to memorize the entire poems. At first I did try to memorize every combination like "Ok this sound goes with the card that has these squigly lines on them and this sound that sounds really similar goes with this card that has some funky U shape with a dash on it". That requires a lot more memorization and it is difficult for the brain to convert that into muscle memory than already familiarizing oneself with the characters. Both ways do take time but in the end you at least know hiragana.

...
Pretty much, they also look a lot smaller in person.
Yes, the cards are actually quite small.

----

You need to learn the grammar too. Kanji is not enough, individual words are not enough. Take the card example we're discussing...

淡路島かよふ千鳥鳴く声に
幾夜寝覚めぬ須磨の関森 <- I made a mistake here, left in for teaching purposes, see below...

あわじしま か よ ふ ちどり なく こえ に
いくよ ね さめ ぬ すま の せき もり

awajishima ka yo fu chidori naku koe ni
ikuyo nesame nu suma no seki mori

The grammar is backward to English. This literally says:

Awaji island plovers singing
How many nights awake at Suma no Sekimori

And it means more into English, "How many nights have I laid awake listening to the plovers from Awaji island singing in Suma no Sekimori shrine?" Both that shrine and island are in Hyogo Prefecture, and you can see here that Awaji island is off the coast from there:
https://maps.google.com/maps?q=%E9%A0%88%E7%A3%A8%E3%81%AE%E9%96%A2%E5%AE%88&ie=UTF-8&hq=&hnear=0x600084fff05e999d:0x5bcee61b64bdb841,Sekimoricho,+Suma+Ward,+Kobe,+Hyogo+Prefecture,+Japan&ei=jYKsUp_FBofP2QW564HACQ&sqi=2&ved=0CJsBELYDMAo

But being Karuta and the 100 poets this is probably about love and 'laid' has the same double meaning in Japanese as English and 'awake' can also mean 'come to my senses' so it can mean listening to the plovers sing while contemplating the number of nights I've laid with someone while in Suma no Sekimori shrine...

Which is my own interpretation. Anyone know an interpretation of that card on the web somewhere? Edit, found one:

Guard of Suma Gate,
From your sleep, how many nights
Have you awakened

At the cries of sanderlings,
Flying from Awaji Island?

It is fairly close to my version aside from the Guard part, very cool for such old Japanese. Not sure where they got Guard from. From: http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/japanese/hyakunin/frames/hyakuframes.html

Oh, I found my booboo. Wrong sekimori. 関守 is indeed guard of the gate... my mistake.

But again you can take "guard of the gate" with a double meaning while contemplating getting laid, if someone is a virgin...
First  Prev  64  65  66  67  68  69  70  71  72  73  74  75  76  77  78  79  80  Next  Last
You must be logged in to post.