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Do you think that the anime industry is dying?
The Wise Wizard
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Posted 1/22/13

Arsenette wrote:

The way I see it I check how many companies existed only for anime in the past and what exists now. That alone gives perspective as to what exactly is going on in the industry. As for the USA side.. it's down to what.. 2 companies still from.. how many?

I assume the two companies you are referring to are Funimation and Sentai, but given that both have a few live action releases, do they qualify as "existed only for anime" any more or less than other companies such as Aniplex of America, NIS America, or Nozomi Entertainment?
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24 / M / unkown
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Posted 1/22/13
Where the Hell is the Yuri thats what I want to know.....
There Needs To Be More Yuri Anime like Strawberry panic, thats what we need right now, not a lot of harem Anime's but More Yuri Anime 's
Thats what we need, THAT"S WHAT I WANT!!!!
I WANT MORE YURI ANIME!!!!! I NEED MORE YURI ANIME!!!!!!!!!!
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27 / F / Oak Park, MI USA
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Posted 1/22/13
I don't think anime is dying per say. I think that buying physical copies ( DVD, BLU-RAY) and dubbing are starting to die down. I mean with places like Netflix, HULU, and CR offering the anime on their programs(sites) it's just making people buy less and less dvd's, blu-ray's. Then you have set boxs like Roku who also offer these programs on your boxes. Most people complain about subbed anime but to me subbed anime is like reading a moving manga so I don't have a problem with it. I think most people got use to dubbed, but the thing that kills me with dubbed is it takes so long to come out in the states. If you're someone like me you don't want to wait that long so you just go ahead and search for sites like CR to finish it up. Plus another thing that bothers me about dubbed is that they use the same voice actors for every anime.
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23 / M / BAYSIDE,NY
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Posted 1/22/13
it is dying because they don't know what to create now everything they're doing its pretty much the same shit...they lack on imagination...
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41 / M / smurf village
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Posted 1/22/13 , edited 1/22/13

LadiSiren wrote:

I don't think anime is dying per say. I think that buying physical copies ( DVD, BLU-RAY) and dubbing are starting to die down. I mean with places like Netflix, HULU, and CR offering the anime on their programs(sites) it's just making people buy less and less dvd's, blu-ray's. Then you have set boxs like Roku who also offer these programs on your boxes. Most people complain about subbed anime but to me subbed anime is like reading a moving manga so I don't have a problem with it. I think most people got use to dubbed, but the thing that kills me with dubbed is it takes so long to come out in the states. If you're someone like me you don't want to wait that long so you just go ahead and search for sites like CR to finish it up. Plus another thing that bothers me about dubbed is that they use the same voice actors for every anime.


The average american does not have the money to spend 30 to 40 bucks a pop on single disc volumes. i personally watch on my ROKU and if i truly enjoy i will buy regardless of price ( I had to save my money forever in the days of VHS)

I also agree you about the dubbing. go back and look into the US releases from the late 90s early 2000s. the voice actors were using aliases to get the work (union issues) but these are the same actors still doing the dubbing today to give one example Steven Blum - David Lucas from Cowboy Bebop. my daughter after seeing a series from 2000 decided she wanted to go into voice acting, She wants to do the dub thing. she did not realize it at the time but she had met the main voice actress of her fave series. She was sad when she found out because the actress name was different.

I prefer subtitles to dubs. Just because for so many years the Dubbing sucked. either the timing was off or there was no emotion. at least with the original audio you can feel the original emotional content intent. in the states it is the hardcore fans that are keeping the industry alive. we do not want to have to resort to the days of the backyard convention/bootleg parties of the 80s. (illegal downloading).

I watch on CR and then go and show my support for my favorite anime by using my purchasing power. i can't afford it so i save my money sometimes it takes a long time sometimes it does not, but i love my physical copies. I will continue to show my support for in this fashion.

LONG LIVE ANIME LONG LIVE CRUNCHYROLL!

umm i apologize if i got off topic.
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25 / M / Sydney, Australia
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Posted 1/22/13 , edited 1/22/13
I don't think anime is dying (got people who buy collector's stuffs worldwide to keep it going, I'm one of them), but creativity is dying.

Some months ago, I got so bored of watching cheesy action shows, that I craved parody animes and my wish came true... 2013, I got three parody animes to watch; Gintama, Cuticle Detective Inaba and Ixion Saga DT.
The Wise Wizard
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Posted 1/22/13

LadiSiren wrote:

I don't think anime is dying per say. I think that buying physical copies ( DVD, BLU-RAY) and dubbing are starting to die down. I mean with places like Netflix, HULU, and CR offering the anime on their programs(sites) it's just making people buy less and less dvd's, blu-ray's. Then you have set boxs like Roku who also offer these programs on your boxes. Most people complain about subbed anime but to me subbed anime is like reading a moving manga so I don't have a problem with it. I think most people got use to dubbed, but the thing that kills me with dubbed is it takes so long to come out in the states. If you're someone like me you don't want to wait that long so you just go ahead and search for sites like CR to finish it up. Plus another thing that bothers me about dubbed is that they use the same voice actors for every anime.

While I expect dubbing as percentage of titles released has decreased, I suspect if you compared 2012 to say 2002, the number of dubbed titles released wouldn't be that different.

Your statement of "...but to me subbed anime is like reading a moving manga..." is a good explanation, which also agrees with why I prefer to watch dubbed when possible, as I'm not a manga reader.

Regarding using the same voice actors, I'm always amused how people call this out, but overlook how often companies in Japan do the very same thing. The reasons may be different (US = limited pool of experienced anime voice actors, Japan = name recognition), but the result is the same.
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53 / M / Northeast Ohio, USA
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Posted 1/23/13 , edited 1/23/13

LadiSiren wrote: Most people complain about subbed anime but to me subbed anime is like reading a moving manga so I don't have a problem with it. ...

I am not a big manga reader, but for me, subbed anime is like subbed live action movies, which I had watched quite a bit at different times, well before I got into anime.

For me, the difference is that the voice acting tends to be more convincing in the original studio dub in Japanese than in the US dub. In my opinion, that's because they record the Japanese dub in a studio with all of the voice actors there stepping up to the microphone when its time for their lines, radio theater style, while in the English dub its done with an actor by themselves recording one of their lines after the other to a three beep count.

When the dub works well, as in Cowboy Bebop, I'm, happy to watch it, but more often than not if I start a series that is available dub-only, I don't finish it.


rebuild_eva01 wrote: My post says "released", I did not say "produced" anywhere, maybe that's where you're getting confused. The stats I provided were for the number of releases, not length of time. An anime that is a movie or 24 episodes is still a single anime release. Therefore, more anime was released in 2012 than any other year.


But you are using them as EVIDENCE for an ARGUMENT. My point is that the number of releases in 2012 and 2006 gives a deceptive picture of the amount of WORK that the anime studios are doing. The amount of WORK being done clearly dropped between 2006 and 2012, because the average amount of work "per release" is more than the 2.3% increase in number of releases between 2006 and 2012.

If in ten years there were 150 3min short TV/web-only series, 10 full length series, 20 movies and 30 digital OAV one-shot episodes as bonuses for people subscribing to digital manga, that would be 200 releases, but well under half the work as 150 full length series, 30 movies, 20 short series and 10 digital OAV one-shots. So the number of releases can be misleading, when the types of releases are ignored.

Total number of minutes animated would also be misleading, since movies and OVA's likely get more work per minute, shorts less work per minute, and flash shorts even less, but it would be closer than the number of releases as a statistic to see how much work the industry is getting financed.
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25 / M / The heart of Linc...
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Posted 1/23/13
Personally, I don't see a decrease in the anime industry worldwide. UK on the other hand, fewer animes are being released with even less bluray versions, dates pushed back and prices going up.
Not to mention that there is virtually none on itunes with the few on there in the lowest quality for the highest price.

I hope there's a restructure in that we get far more available and at better prices. Or even more selection on itunes if they can't make the disks.

If anything, major hollywood companies now see that anime isn't a small market, especially after studio ghibli and summer wars.
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21 / M / San Diego, USA
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Posted 1/23/13

thepeaguy wrote:

It's dying because people are self-entitled pricks (usually American - that's where most of the Western fans are) who'd rather get it for free.

Sites like Netflix and CR are the perfect middle ground for me. I don't waste loads of cash on dvds for one.


Ow, my self-entitled prick of an American heart.
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the South Bay
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Posted 1/23/13 , edited 1/23/13
Thats what I keep hearing about UK, who are the distributors there. I know the one in Australia distributes their stuff there too but that was in the mid 2000.

Its like they have to buy a region free dvd player or region free dvd rom bluray pc player and then buy the dvd from from Japan or US.




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31 / M / Denver
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Posted 1/23/13 , edited 1/23/13

agila61 wrote:


rebuild_eva01 wrote: My post says "released", I did not say "produced" anywhere, maybe that's where you're getting confused. The stats I provided were for the number of releases, not length of time. An anime that is a movie or 24 episodes is still a single anime release. Therefore, more anime was released in 2012 than any other year.


But you are using them as EVIDENCE for an ARGUMENT. My point is that the number of releases in 2012 and 2006 gives a deceptive picture of the amount of WORK that the anime studios are doing. The amount of WORK being done clearly dropped between 2006 and 2012, because the average amount of work "per release" is more than the 2.3% increase in number of releases between 2006 and 2012.

If in ten years there were 150 3min short TV/web-only series, 10 full length series, 20 movies and 30 digital OAV one-shot episodes as bonuses for people subscribing to digital manga, that would be 200 releases, but well under half the work as 150 full length series, 30 movies, 20 short series and 10 digital OAV one-shots. So the number of releases can be misleading, when the types of releases are ignored.

Total number of minutes animated would also be misleading, since movies and OVA's likely get more work per minute, shorts less work per minute, and flash shorts even less, but it would be closer than the number of releases as a statistic to see how much work the industry is getting financed.


Jeez! You're beating a dead horse! You're arguing that more work was committed in 2006 than 2012 based on the FORMAT of anime released, which has NOTHING to do with the overall number of anime released. There were a total of 217 anime releases in 2012, while 2006 had 212 releases. That means in 2012, audiences had 217 anime releases to choose from, whereas in 2006, audiences had 212 anime releases to choose from, REGARDLESS of the format. I don't know why you're twisting the statistics into being about format supremacy and saying I'm the one being deceptive. If you can't comprehend that I listed the total number of anime releases for the last six years, disregarding the amount of work one format requires over another, then we need to just disagree to agree because you're comparing apples to oranges and trolling my facts with your assumptions.
a619ko 
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Posted 1/23/13
Bad anime is dying....

Good anime like SAO is thriving.
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20 / M / Delaware
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Posted 1/23/13

a619ko wrote:

Bad anime is dying....

Good anime like SAO is thriving.


WAIT, GOOD ANIME LIKE SAO!?!?

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M / Where you are.
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Posted 1/23/13
I dont think its dying. I just think things are starting to get repetitive. Like, We have genres but, you start to see the same ol same ol every season. Lets see at SAO for example. We seen this type before from Tower Of Druaga.
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