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Would you rather live in Japan or where you live now? If so why?
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Posted 2/21/13
I for sure want to live there too! My reason for wanting to:
Be a fresh start, get to experience the culture, the fashion, the great Food, cars/drifting, easier for me to get anime and manga!
antx0r 
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Posted 2/22/13

crownhaha wrote:


Shrapnel893 wrote:


antx0r wrote:

I have a friend who lives in Japan. He grew up in Southern California (where I grew up), he speaks fluent Japanese and has a pretty decent job with Google. At first he loved it there, but after a few months, he said it got really boring. The people there are like robots, they are too set in certain routines and many aren't very adventurous, which he thinks stems from their extreme prejudice, which they try very hard to hide, but that just makes it worse. He says that the Japanese (for the most part) live to work, rather than work to live. Also, everything is super expensive. Things are convenient, clean and efficient, but there's very little real variety. For example, a Mexican restaurant, an Italian restaurant and an American style diner have food that look different, but taste exactly the same - bland.

He says it's a great place to visit, but a terrible place to live, but the Japanese believe they live in the greatest country in the world. Yes, many in the people in the US believe the same, but for all the faults and problems the US has, at least Americans are willing to admit their problems and so eventually fixing them. The Japanese seem to have a harder time coming to terms with their problems. In Japan it's 600 times harder to sue someone, which may seem like a good thing, but ironically, it creates an environment where people get screwed all the time, very politely too. In the US, people may not be so polite, but you get screwed less, for the simple fear of not wanting to get sued. He wants to move back to the US.

So basically, even if you had the advantage of knowing the language and having a good job there, apparently, it isn't a very nice place to live...


That's exactly how I imagined it. Huh, interesting. Regardless, like you said, it is a lovely place to visit - but not necessarily to live in. Is that why whenever, say for example, a Japanese teenager transfers overseas to an American school they are usually all over the place after a few days or weeks, compared to when they first arrive. No wait, that could just be the whole adapting to a new environment thing, and also it depends on their personality..


Seriously, you can't really conclude about how living at a certain place would be like from someone elses opinion. You would have to go there yourself. I've read lots on the internet about peopel visiting/studying in Japan and wether or not it would be nice living there and whatnot. And guess what, some love it, some don't. As an example I read on a blog who's owner had studied Japanese in Japan and he really enjoyed it, and most of what he wrote really deviates from what the guy you quoted did. I would really like for some of the people here to read it but it's in my mothertounge (Swedish) and google translate would probably ruin the experience. However. Don't judge something based on what others say, experience it yourself.


Obviously individual experiences will vary. Not everyone can afford to just uproot and go live in Japan, and so the experiences of others are important in determining whether such a venture is worth the cost and commitment. The problem with some of the experiences of others is that most people only really VISIT Japan. Going there to study for a few months, I think is still considered visiting, because the people that go to Japan to "study" implicitly or explicitly intent to return. From what my friend tells me, that intent to return or not really does change your experience. My friend actually went there to live, that is, he went with no intention to return. Quote: "things really changed when I went from saying 'that's how THEY live' to 'that's how WE live.'"

My friend's biggest complaint about Japan is that it gets really boring. He's the type that doesn't like to do the same things over and over again. Not a big fan of routine. He told me that the ramen in Japan is amazing, that any ramen place in Japan will blow away any ramen place in the US hands down. Problem is, every single ramen shop tastes the same. The ramen is awesome, but there is no variety. He dislikes going out after work with his co-workers because they go to the same bar, have the same drinks and talk about the same things every day. Everyone is polite to each other, nobody talks shit or gets into fights, not even heated verbal arguments. He says that the Japanese are so emotionally repressed that it's no wonder they're so perverted.

I actually plan to go visit him next time I get some time off. He's very excited for when I get there, because he knows we'll probably go on some rampage lol. Both of us have almost gotten arrested several times when we used to hang out back when he still lived in the US for shenanigans we used to pull, especially when we got drunk. Fun times.
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Posted 2/22/13 , edited 2/22/13

antx0r wrote:


crownhaha wrote:


Shrapnel893 wrote:


antx0r wrote:

I have a friend who lives in Japan. He grew up in Southern California (where I grew up), he speaks fluent Japanese and has a pretty decent job with Google. At first he loved it there, but after a few months, he said it got really boring. The people there are like robots, they are too set in certain routines and many aren't very adventurous, which he thinks stems from their extreme prejudice, which they try very hard to hide, but that just makes it worse. He says that the Japanese (for the most part) live to work, rather than work to live. Also, everything is super expensive. Things are convenient, clean and efficient, but there's very little real variety. For example, a Mexican restaurant, an Italian restaurant and an American style diner have food that look different, but taste exactly the same - bland.

He says it's a great place to visit, but a terrible place to live, but the Japanese believe they live in the greatest country in the world. Yes, many in the people in the US believe the same, but for all the faults and problems the US has, at least Americans are willing to admit their problems and so eventually fixing them. The Japanese seem to have a harder time coming to terms with their problems. In Japan it's 600 times harder to sue someone, which may seem like a good thing, but ironically, it creates an environment where people get screwed all the time, very politely too. In the US, people may not be so polite, but you get screwed less, for the simple fear of not wanting to get sued. He wants to move back to the US.

So basically, even if you had the advantage of knowing the language and having a good job there, apparently, it isn't a very nice place to live...


That's exactly how I imagined it. Huh, interesting. Regardless, like you said, it is a lovely place to visit - but not necessarily to live in. Is that why whenever, say for example, a Japanese teenager transfers overseas to an American school they are usually all over the place after a few days or weeks, compared to when they first arrive. No wait, that could just be the whole adapting to a new environment thing, and also it depends on their personality..


Seriously, you can't really conclude about how living at a certain place would be like from someone elses opinion. You would have to go there yourself. I've read lots on the internet about peopel visiting/studying in Japan and wether or not it would be nice living there and whatnot. And guess what, some love it, some don't. As an example I read on a blog who's owner had studied Japanese in Japan and he really enjoyed it, and most of what he wrote really deviates from what the guy you quoted did. I would really like for some of the people here to read it but it's in my mothertounge (Swedish) and google translate would probably ruin the experience. However. Don't judge something based on what others say, experience it yourself.


Obviously individual experiences will vary. Not everyone can afford to just uproot and go live in Japan, and so the experiences of others are important in determining whether such a venture is worth the cost and commitment. The problem with some of the experiences of others is that most people only really VISIT Japan. Going there to study for a few months, I think is still considered visiting, because the people that go to Japan to "study" implicitly or explicitly intent to return. From what my friend tells me, that intent to return or not really does change your experience. My friend actually went there to live, that is, he went with no intention to return. Quote: "things really changed when I went from saying 'that's how THEY live' to 'that's how WE live.'"

My friend's biggest complaint about Japan is that it gets really boring. He's the type that doesn't like to do the same things over and over again. Not a big fan of routine. He told me that the ramen in Japan is amazing, that any ramen place in Japan will blow away any ramen place in the US hands down. Problem is, every single ramen shop tastes the same. The ramen is awesome, but there is no variety. He dislikes going out after work with his co-workers because they go to the same bar, have the same drinks and talk about the same things every day. Everyone is polite to each other, nobody talks shit or gets into fights, not even heated verbal arguments. He says that the Japanese are so emotionally repressed that it's no wonder they're so perverted.

I actually plan to go visit him next time I get some time off. He's very excited for when I get there, because he knows we'll probably go on some rampage lol. Both of us have almost gotten arrested several times when we used to hang out back when he still lived in the US for shenanigans we used to pull, especially when we got drunk. Fun times.



I heard it is extremely expensive down there now but even more the reason to go there. I go there solely because I wish for it myself.
I already made a vow with myself Christmas 2012. That wont change. Take the time it must to come to that point. I will at least try.
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Posted 2/22/13
Honestly, I'd rather live in Japan. Ever since I returned from Taiwan, the US doesn't feel like home anymore. Japan would be closer to Taiwan and it wouldn't feel so foreign.
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Posted 2/22/13

antx0r wrote:


crownhaha wrote:


Shrapnel893 wrote:


antx0r wrote:

I have a friend who lives in Japan. He grew up in Southern California (where I grew up), he speaks fluent Japanese and has a pretty decent job with Google. At first he loved it there, but after a few months, he said it got really boring. The people there are like robots, they are too set in certain routines and many aren't very adventurous, which he thinks stems from their extreme prejudice, which they try very hard to hide, but that just makes it worse. He says that the Japanese (for the most part) live to work, rather than work to live. Also, everything is super expensive. Things are convenient, clean and efficient, but there's very little real variety. For example, a Mexican restaurant, an Italian restaurant and an American style diner have food that look different, but taste exactly the same - bland.

He says it's a great place to visit, but a terrible place to live, but the Japanese believe they live in the greatest country in the world. Yes, many in the people in the US believe the same, but for all the faults and problems the US has, at least Americans are willing to admit their problems and so eventually fixing them. The Japanese seem to have a harder time coming to terms with their problems. In Japan it's 600 times harder to sue someone, which may seem like a good thing, but ironically, it creates an environment where people get screwed all the time, very politely too. In the US, people may not be so polite, but you get screwed less, for the simple fear of not wanting to get sued. He wants to move back to the US.

So basically, even if you had the advantage of knowing the language and having a good job there, apparently, it isn't a very nice place to live...


That's exactly how I imagined it. Huh, interesting. Regardless, like you said, it is a lovely place to visit - but not necessarily to live in. Is that why whenever, say for example, a Japanese teenager transfers overseas to an American school they are usually all over the place after a few days or weeks, compared to when they first arrive. No wait, that could just be the whole adapting to a new environment thing, and also it depends on their personality..



Seriously, you can't really conclude about how living at a certain place would be like from someone elses opinion. You would have to go there yourself. I've read lots on the internet about peopel visiting/studying in Japan and wether or not it would be nice living there and whatnot. And guess what, some love it, some don't. As an example I read on a blog who's owner had studied Japanese in Japan and he really enjoyed it, and most of what he wrote really deviates from what the guy you quoted did. I would really like for some of the people here to read it but it's in my mothertounge (Swedish) and google translate would probably ruin the experience. However. Don't judge something based on what others say, experience it yourself.


Obviously individual experiences will vary. Not everyone can afford to just uproot and go live in Japan, and so the experiences of others are important in determining whether such a venture is worth the cost and commitment. The problem with some of the experiences of others is that most people only really VISIT Japan. Going there to study for a few months, I think is still considered visiting, because the people that go to Japan to "study" implicitly or explicitly intent to return. From what my friend tells me, that intent to return or not really does change your experience. My friend actually went there to live, that is, he went with no intention to return. Quote: "things really changed when I went from saying 'that's how THEY live' to 'that's how WE live.'"

My friend's biggest complaint about Japan is that it gets really boring. He's the type that doesn't like to do the same things over and over again. Not a big fan of routine. He told me that the ramen in Japan is amazing, that any ramen place in Japan will blow away any ramen place in the US hands down. Problem is, every single ramen shop tastes the same. The ramen is awesome, but there is no variety. He dislikes going out after work with his co-workers because they go to the same bar, have the same drinks and talk about the same things every day. Everyone is polite to each other, nobody talks shit or gets into fights, not even heated verbal arguments. He says that the Japanese are so emotionally repressed that it's no wonder they're so perverted.

I actually plan to go visit him next time I get some time off. He's very excited for when I get there, because he knows we'll probably go on some rampage lol. Both of us have almost gotten arrested several times when we used to hang out back when he still lived in the US for shenanigans we used to pull, especially when we got drunk. Fun times.



As I said, reading about other peoples experience isn't bad, but remember to keep an open mind, that's all. Cause no matter what it always boils down to personal preference and whatnot. I see now that maybe I should've explained a bit more about the whole studying part. These "months" I was talking about is only the introduction, where you learn enough Japanese to find yourself a part-time job on your own and then you continue from there. The goal is to study for 2 years and learn enough Japanese to be able to get yourself into the university or something of the like. So this is really preparing to be able to live by yourself in Japan, not just visiting for a few months.

About your friend, he put himself in that place, why is he restraining himself? What is keeping him from exploring Japan a bit more? Did he just move there and then settle down immediatly? Cause if so, then he only got himself to blame really, if you ask me atleast.
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Posted 2/22/13 , edited 2/22/13
I like Japan, but I wouldn't move there for an extended period of time. They don't like us foreigners. Plus the novelty would run out fast. At the most, I'd stay there for a month tops.

I would rather like to live somewhere outside of Australia. The only thing I really like about Australia is our sense of humour, laid back attitude, and the fact that we show our friendship by casually calling out mates c*nts. However I'd prefer something like England or the US. Or maybe I could go back to my roots and live in Ireland. But Japan? Nah. Not on your life.
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Posted 2/22/13
i would have to say japan. they have a nicer culture than the us from what i have seen. plus they help eachother out more and, lets face it. anime is better than us cartoons like spongebob.
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Posted 2/23/13
If I could speak and write fluent Japanese, I would move and live there the second I had the chance.
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Posted 2/23/13
I've lived there for years before and I would move back.
Most of the stuff I love to do was around the area where I lived which was nice.
Lannae 
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Posted 2/23/13
Go live in Japan just for the sake of my hobby? No thanks. I'd rather stay where I am, where I have a good job with a good income, great friends, and of course, family near me.
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Posted 2/23/13

Would you rather live in Japan or where you live now? If so why?


Asking if I'd rather run away??

ARE YOU SURE YOU WANT TO ASK THAT??
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Posted 2/23/13
Just being alive is good enough for me. Geography is optional.

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Posted 2/23/13
If the US collapses and glorious end comes, I would either move to Canada or Japan. Safe and stable countries. If they fail, I'd try for Norway. Very nice lifestyle there.
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Posted 2/24/13
I've lived in Japan before, and I would sure as hell go back if I had the chance. I'm done with America.
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Posted 2/24/13
food, culture, and lower crime rates... although there are a few different countries i'd move to for those same reasons, not just japan.
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