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The fact that alot of animes dosn't get finished
The Wise Wizard
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Posted 1/27/13

tehstud wrote:

It's a shame really.

Seems nowadays an anime is doomed unless it can get a rise out of the audience's crotch.

Counter-exhibit one:
Natsume Yuujinchou (4 series)

Posted 1/28/13

aidenraine wrote:

I think ruroni kenshin is a bit of a 'pimp slap', too. the reason the anime was canceled was because of poor ratings caused by filler arcs. the series is still really popular, though. they really should do a reboot, especially since they won't have to deal with the filler issues anymore.


Yeah, that was a weird series for me. I mean I really enjoyed it, but after I finished the Kyoto arc I never watched the rest of the series. I had heard the rest of the series was fillers and there were like 30 episodes left so I just said "heck no". I always wondered if I should've just finished it.

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Posted 1/28/13
I know how you feel. The manga is like 300 chapter long, then they release 12 episodes in the anime and cover only 1 or 2 arcs. Still i guess its just something we have to come to terms with. Continue to enjoy the manga, and curse the company for making the anime.
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35 / M / Northern California
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Posted 1/28/13
It stands to reason this has happened to some series because the original creator passes away. Even if there is enough existing material to continue, the way copyright law is handled in Japan is still very finicky. Basically, if the creator (or their estate, if deceased) disagrees with the way the project is going, it can halt any further production. This is why School Rumble's third season never happened, as one of many examples (though the story was finished in print, with School Rumble Z.) It's often budget issues that can kill a series, but often disagreements with the holder of the intellectual property are just as fatal.
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24 / M / The heart of Linc...
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Posted 1/28/13
Sadly it's the case with a lot of shows, not just anime. Invasion, the 4400, sonic Satam, Reboot and so many others too have met this fate.

It's mind boggling that something that has a fan base, where fans in the thousands want it, willingly buy it yet they refuse. I can understand if the creator/s fall out with the company making it. Difference of opinions for media results in either rushing things where key elements of the story are lost or the story is stretched out to the point where it becomes retcon so that they can stories that have no relation to the plot but just to consume time. Fillers can be interesting ideas in their own but only if they make sense and become key to the plot. I.E the bleach fillers at 1st offered an explanation to other powers/creatures that fit in the story as well as explain the time jumps. What I hate were the later fillers which go back to a previous arc where current characters/powers happen and then they forget or ignore the huge paradox they made.

I just wish they'd give the shows the endings they deserve. I understand that it's not always possible with rights and distributions, but if something is really popular, why not give it a conclusion then on a cliffhanger or a abrupt end with no resolution.
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Posted 1/28/13
I've been watching a lot of anime again lately, and I too have noticed that sometimes the series just gets cut short for one reason or another, although its usually financially-related. Which is totally understandable, you can't keep making the show if its not bringing any money in.

Birdy the Mighty is one example. I heard it didn't fare very well, but it did well enough to get a second season. But I think the second season didn't do very well either (having a much darker story line may have had something to do with it I think, but I did like the Birdy character development).

Other times they may end up butting heads with the original creator of the source material. For example, I heard Infinite Stratos sold very well, but they can't make any more at the moment due to a disagreement between the author of the light novels and the producers of the anime show (again, probably financially related). Which kind of sucks because I was hoping to get more of that show.

Other times they get caught up to the source material story-wise, and have to wait for more to come out, or else they risk doing filler episodes consisting largely of recycled footage, or veering off in a patch radically different from the original story. High School of the Dead is suffering from this, as the manga is coming out very slowly, so I think they don't want to make another season until there's more chapters of the manga (it may be poor sales too, but I don't have the figures on me to verify).

Another weird case is where they just go in their own direction in the anime version. Rosario + Vampire is MUCH darker in the manga vs. the anime. Characters get killed or at least seriously injured, the story line is much bleaker (imagine the last arc from the first season, and then imagine if they stuck with that for season 2), and there isn't as much blatant fanservice like in the anime version. The anime diverged so much from the manga that you'd have to pretty much reboot it if you wanted the anime to stick to the manga source more closely.

An interesting look at how some of these things are done can be seen in episode 8 of Oreimo. Kirino wants the anime team to do all sorts of interesting things that she believes would make her anime adaptation awesome, such as certain voice actors and making a new opening song for every episode (which incidentally they do for the endings to this show). Then the dev team tells her they can't do almost any of it due to financial or time constraints, and you can just see Kirino's enthusiasm being sapped away as they continually shoot her ideas down.

http://www.crunchyroll.com/oreimo

Bottom line is that a show has to be financially successful to warrant any more of it being produced. But as you can see here, sometimes other things happen which kind of block the show from being made.
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Posted 1/28/13
Yeah, I'm annoyed too, I prefer unfinished endings, rather than the anime directors making up an alternative crappy ending because they wouldn't do season 2 later.

If I get curious about the anime's true ending, I just follow the manga.
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Posted 1/28/13

GayAsianBoy wrote:

Yeah, I'm annoyed too, I prefer unfinished endings, rather than the anime directors making up an alternative crappy ending because they wouldn't do season 2 later.

If I get curious about the anime's true ending, I just follow the manga.


Provided it was adapted from a manga. The ending to Chrono Crusade was different in the anime than in the manga and both were great, then again that was a full show.
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24 / M / i wont say
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Posted 1/28/13
i really hate it too. honestly, i dont get how anime like naruto thrive when it really is just filler and some annoying scenes where as anime like air gear has a great story that went unfinished. as online is the only place i could even get manga, anime is my only option. and crunchyroll fits the bill for most of them
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53 / M / Northeast Ohio, USA
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Posted 1/28/13

Waterst1 wrote: Sometimes, it's because the source materials are still ongoing and they don't have enough materials to continue.

Often, it all boils down to financing. For a series to be green-lit and made, you'll need investors. As an investor, would you finance a 2nd series for something that hasn't done very well or would you look for something more promising? I'm sure majority of the people will choose the latter.

Yes. Its most often DVD/BD sales in Japan, especially for the late night anime. Its just a fact of life that a manga can survive on an audience paying $4 for a weekly serial and $10 for a tankoboun. However, since the collapse of DVD/BD rentals and after over a decade of falling TV ratings, most anime depends upon a small group of Japanese otaku willing to pay $100's for a series in order to survive.

However, it can also be merchandise sales, sales of the original content for anima based on manga, light novels and visual novels, or commercial tie-ins. So Chihaya Furu had disappointing DVD/BD sales, and people looking at the sale charts expected it wouldn't get a sequel ~ but it must have helped sell back issues of the original content, since it came back for what looks like a one season sequel.

The first Maria-sama ga Miteru anime based on the light novel series did fairly well for a late night anime, so they ordered a second one and put it on morning (before school) TV. But the second one disappointed, so the third set they made was an OVA and lots of people expected that was that. But then Pizza Hut decided that it was a good fit for them, and did a tie in that allowed the "fourth" series to be made.


"Maybe if I pretend to read this Pizza Hut billboard, they won't realize I'm stalking them."


The funniest abrupt ending I've heard about was an early Maid show ~ they had technical difficulties, and weren't doing well enough to get enough extra funding to finish the season. So at the end of the last episode, they had their klutzy / tech skilled maid get excited about recording a TV show, and put in a VHS cassette with a label on it that indicated it was the next week' episode.

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Posted 1/28/13
Yeah annoys me with anime that is either completely unfinished or it feels like the last episode was rushed and ends abruptly
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20 / M / Sweden
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Posted 1/28/13
It seems the fault is the way the anime business work, that they mostly depend on a small fanbase to keep paying outrageous prices to keep their favourite anime alive.

But i always belived that Anime/Manga was really big in Japan? That pretty much everyone was involved in it in one way or another. But if they were, wouldn't more anime "survive"?

I haven't really noticed if there are any ads in Anime, but i personally wouldn't mind if they were like drinking Coca Cola in the anime.
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Posted 1/29/13

dacan13 wrote: It seems the fault is the way the anime business work, that they mostly depend on a small fanbase to keep paying outrageous prices to keep their favourite anime alive.

Yes ~ not by choice, of course, but because that source of income developed as the other sources of income they had declined.

That's a reason why its important for us to support the industry. If they can get 1/5 of their net revenue as license income from overseas, it means that some productions can survive that wouldn't be able to survive on the Japanese market alone. Overseas customers cannot replace having Japanese markets, but we can supplement them.


But i always belived that Anime/Manga was really big in Japan? That pretty much everyone was involved in it in one way or another. But if they were, wouldn't more anime "survive"?

Remember that Manga is bigger than Anime in Japan. Manga is mass market ~ weekly, biweekly, monthly and quarterly serials printed on cheap paper going for under $5, people tossing them in the trash bin at the train station when they are done with them, while tankoboun for series fans are widely available for under $10. Manga reading cafes where you can read all the manga you like "for free" ~ but pay a little extra for the food and drink. Light Novels are also the kind of thing sold at newsagents at train stations for commuter to read to pass the time on their commute.

And lots of people watching a bit of anime at some time in their life doesn't automatically mean a big audience for all anime. One reason we see more anime movies, both compilations and remakes, is that with the aging of the population, its easier to get people into the movie theater to see a reboot of Neon Genesis Evangelian than it is to get them to get them to tune in every week at 1am Thursday night.

And merchandise rights tends to be heavily biased toward the biggest hits: notebook covers and pencil pads and cellphone charms are more likely to be One Piece and Neon Genesis than the average anime of the season. A hit of a season may get up into that league, but most productions in a season are more niche markets.


I haven't really noticed if there are any ads in Anime, but i personally wouldn't mind if they were like drinking Coca Cola in the anime.


The product placement in Maria-sama ga Miteru weren't ads as such, it was things like having pizza when the gang gets together for New Years, but it was supported by the characters used in print advertising and appearing on Pizza Boxes.

The biggest brand placement in recent years was of course Tiger and Bunny, where they make a series based on the idea of superheros being sponsored by companies, and instead of using make-believe brands, they bid out the sponsorship to actual companies and actual brands.
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Posted 1/29/13 , edited 1/29/13





Ahh i see, thank you for taking the time to reply!
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