First  Prev  1  2  3  4  Next  Last
What genre allows an anime to be most successful?
8104 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
24 / M / Canada
Offline
Posted 1/29/13
I think ecchi , romance , and slice of life allows anime to be successful. Oh yeah i forgot. Drama.
20587 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
15 / F / Texas
Offline
Posted 1/29/13
I'm guessing romance , ecchi , comedy , and drama. Those are the kind i watch anyways.
Posted 1/29/13
Echii and hentai.
17024 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
24 / M / Middle of Nowhere...
Offline
Posted 1/29/13
boobs, guns & zombies
53311 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
43 / M / Canada
Online
Posted 1/30/13 , edited 1/30/13
Everyone is guessing here? How about some data... what, real data is no fun? Sure it is!

Best sellers since 2000:

http://www.mania.com/aodvb/showthread.php?p=2010468#post2010468

The list is longer but here is a top 15:



001) *78,671 31,831 ¥3,558m 15 (*6) 2009 Shaft___________ Aniplex______ Bakemonogatari
002) *71,057 --,--- ¥3,069m 12 (*6) 2011 Shaft___________ Aniplex______ Mahou Shoujo Madoka Magica
003) *68,734 10,392 ¥5,629m 50 (13) 2004 Sunrise_________ Bandai_______ Kidou Senshi Gundam SEED Destiny
004) *60,580 --,--- ¥2,244m 11 (*5) 2012 Shaft___________ Aniplex______ Nisemonogatari
005) *58,589 24,736 ¥4,798m 50 (13) 2002 Sunrise_________ Bandai_______ Kidou Senshi Gundam SEED
006) *52,133 --,--- ¥2,080m 25 (*1) 2011 ufotable________ Aniplex______ Fate/Zero
007) *46,146 --,--- ¥2,705m 25 (*9) 2008 Satelight_______ Bandai_______ Macross Frontier
008) *45,804 --,--- ¥1,635m 12 (*1) 2012 ufotable________ Aniplex______ Fate/Zero Second Season
009) *45,366 *9,765 ¥2,375m 25 (*9) 2006 Sunrise_________ Bandai_______ Code Geass: Hangyaku no Lelouch (see note below)
010) *43,883 --,--- ¥2,309m 14 (*7) 2009 Kyoto Animation_ Pony Canyon__ K-ON!
011) *42,690 *4,566 ¥2,370m 25 (*9) 2008 Sunrise_________ Bandai_______ Code Geass: Hangyaku no Lelouch R2
012) *41,037 34,000 ¥2,091m 14 (*8) 2006 Kyoto Animation_ Kadokawa_____ Suzumiya Haruhi no Yuuutsu
013) *39,385 --,--- ¥2,888m 27 (*9) 2010 Kyoto Animation_ Pony Canyon__ K-ON!!
014) *39,352 *5,184 ¥1,658m 25 (*7) 2007 Sunrise_________ Bandai_______ Kidou Senshi Gundam 00
015) *37,313 --,--- ¥1,145m 25 (*9) 2012 A1 Pictures_____ Aniplex______ Sword Art Online ★(4 vol)


So we have mecha, magical girls, ecchi, supernatural, SAO, K-ON!, Haruhi, VN adaptations, light novel adaptations, originals...

More recent data. Best selling in 2012:
http://www.mania.com/aodvb/showthread.php?p=2010464#post2010464

Hits, over 10000 sales in 2012:


10,000+
60,580 - Nisemonogatari (Winter, 5 vols) 8,586 DVD (15%) / 51,995 BD (86%)
45,804 - Fate/Zero Second Season (Spring, 1 vols)
37,313 - Sword Art Online (Summer, 9 vols) 7,141 DVD (20%) / 30,173 BD (81%)
23,029 - Girls und Panzer (Fall, 6 vols) DVD (0%) / 23,029 BD (100%)
23,011 - Kuroko no Basuke (Spring, 9 vols) 12,691 DVD (56%) / 10,320 BD (45%)
21,019 - Kyoukai Senjou no Horizon II (Summer, 7 vols)
15,820 - Chuunibyou Demo Koi ga Shitai! (Fall, 7 vols) 1,842 DVD (12%) / 13,979 BD (89%)
12,674 - To Love-Ru Darkness (Fall, 6 vols) 1,928 DVD (16%) / 10,746 BD (85%)
11,723 - Gintama' Enchousen (Fall, 3 vols)
11,609 - Little Busters! (Fall, 9 vols) 1,757 DVD (16%) / 9,852 BD (85%)
10,622 - Inu x Boku SS (Winter, 7 vols) 5,246 DVD (50%) / 5,376 BD (51%)


SAO is game / battle royale genre.

Fate is VN adaptation, fighting?

Little Busters is VN adaptation, slice.

Nisemonogatari is ecchi light novel adaptation.

Girls Und Panzer and Kuroko no Basuke are sports anime.

Again not sure any one thing sells but I don't see any zombies selling. Not a lot of ecchi selling, To Love-Ru being the exception. Unless you count tentacles on Asuna in SAO... Guess there is a fair amount of bouncing in Horizon and Chuunibyou.

Side note: All of the Top 6 and 10/12 top sellers overall aired on Crunchyroll, good job guys! The other two were on TAN/AOD. Funimation shut out of the big hits...
63251 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
47 / M / KC
Offline
Posted 1/30/13
By itself, I'd say genre isn't the deciding factor. A show is successful based on how well it is made and how it caters to its audience.

On the other hand, genre can make success easier because of the "built-in" audience. Certain genres are very popular. So, if you were to create an anime for one of those genres then you'd have some assurance that your show would get watched initially.

That's really *all* the genre will do for you. Get you initial viewers. If you make a bad show or don't connect with that audience, your show will fail.
22480 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
18 / M / Area 11
Offline
Posted 1/30/13
Recently Moe/Slice of Life has been the most successful, however things change evers few years. In the 80's and early 90's Mecha was at it's prime, and in late 90's and early 2000's, Shonen action ended up being huge. So I really don't think there is any solid anime genre that will always be popular or easily sell-able.
1141 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
F / United States
Offline
Posted 1/30/13
I think Comedy and Action mostly, because I find it more interesting to watch.
15778 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
Offline
Posted 1/30/13 , edited 1/30/13
Romance. I guarantee in every new season of anime, romance will be in 70% of them. Many animes focus on this, some will use it as a side-genre, and some may just portray subtle hints.

Just goes to show that most of the viewers of anime have a "craving" for romance, which is why this is an archetype in most animes.

Therefore companies exploit that fact and add romance as a genre to most of the up-coming animes.

Why? Because they make more money doing so.
2373 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
24 / M
Offline
Posted 1/31/13 , edited 1/31/13
The trouble we're having here is the definition of "success". What is success? Popularity? Money? Duration in the market? Without definite answers to those questions, we're shooting in the dark.
Ah, but that's fun... especially with machine guns and bazookas... okay, sorry for the sarcasm.

From a writer's perspective, I'd say popularity is success, but more specifically, there's two kinds of popularity that I might call a "success":
1) Instant widespread popularity. This is the kind of thing people look back at and go "I remember when X was popular". A great number of people knew and talked about it, and of course, everyone went to go see it.
Then there's...
2) Reception and fan-base formation. Most everyone here I'm sure has at least heard of Naruto and Touhou. Even if you don't care for either one, undoubtedly there is a fan-base. An artist should know not to expect that everyone will like their work, but I'm sure they'd consider their work a success if they knew it had a following / a crowd that liked it. This sort of thing creates legacies that aren't artificial and it sets up a sphere of influence where the artist / writer is revered.

From a business perspective...
Yeah, it's about the money. They need to stay in business, so they need the money. The stats were already given above.

From a personal perspective...
it's a very personal (and therefore VERY bias) opinion. "Do I like this show?" If not, you probably wouldn't qualify it as a success unless you are judging it on the basis of certain criteria. For instance, you might rate it on it's artistic qualities rather than it's appeal to the human emotions. Case in point: I think Shakespeare was a probably a great writer, but I could care less about anything he wrote. Was his work a success? Well... it wasn't a hit with me.
53311 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
43 / M / Canada
Online
Posted 1/31/13
Successful and popular are different things. So is culturally important. This is a business mostly so I think you need to make money to be successful but the above numbers are just one source of income so it doesn't paint the entire picture.

Some might say they succeeded if they made a lasting impact, regardless of the money but I'm not sure you can really do one without the other. I would say that successful, popular works will generally leave an impression for a long time. I didn't include the before 2000 list above but I can't think of too many popular anime, or ones which made a lasting impression without also being successful in sales and therefore being on the list.

Shakespeare wasn't trying to write great plays, to make a lasting impression. He was trying to sell tickets, bottom line. He never would have imagined students struggling through his works hundreds of years later.
34152 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
M / Where you are.
Online
Posted 1/31/13
It seems like Action is where a lot of people are paying attention too. Bleach, One Piece, Naruto. Those are all large hits w/ Action. Im a huge fan of Romance Harem anime but it seems more people like Action.
137 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
27 / M / Florida
Offline
Posted 1/31/13
It depends on what you mean by successful.

If you're talking about in terms of sales I'd say hpully's answer was a fairly good one, though the data set starts 2000 so the actual answer might vary a bit.

If you're talking about in terms of a shows sustainability then I'd say http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_anime_series_by_episode_count is a good list to look at for your answer.

Finally if you're talking about in terms of popularity http://myanimelist.net/topanime.php?type=bypopularity would be a good place to look at to get you're answer. Though normally with popularity it's a mix of finding a story people enjoy and dumb luck that people will actually find it...
63251 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
47 / M / KC
Offline
Posted 1/31/13

hpulley wrote:
Shakespeare wasn't trying to write great plays, to make a lasting impression. He was trying to sell tickets, bottom line. He never would have imagined students struggling through his works hundreds of years later.


There's a lot of truth to this. Now, he knew he was good, so he'd want to make great plays He certainly spent a lot of time competing with his contemporary playwrights, so he wasn't afraid of adding high brow material to his plays. But he knew he had to make money. Getting people in the seats was really important so he also had to cater to the masses. That's why you'll often find puns, bad jokes, romance, fighting, and lots of blood in most of his plays.

The same is true today. The majority of classics that we enjoy today were not only good but commercially successful. We don't remember flops.
40758 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
39 / M / Utah
Offline
Posted 1/31/13
I've never heard of a magical girl show that failed.

First  Prev  1  2  3  4  Next  Last
You must be logged in to post.