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Korean High School and looking pretty
Posted 2/5/13 , edited 2/5/13
So i cam across this student documentary about school in Korea and its kinda like over bored with the studding and there's like nothing to do out side of school apparently

but whats bugs me is they have e lesson on what it miens to be good looking

so in shot most people wont to kill them self because studding stupid hours

and being told your ugly at school by the teachers and friends

http://vimeo.com/26833191#

i all so only found out about Eye glue because this and dont look safe XD

so whats your opinion on this



In sixty short years, South Korea went from being one of the poorest countries in Asia to having the world's 13th largest economy. Korean students have some of the highest test scores in the world, and a higher rate of acceptance into American Ivy Leagues than any other foreign country. But Korea also leads the world in two not quite so stunning ways- the highest rate of plastic surgery per capita, and a higher suicide rate than any other developed nation.
So. What's life like for a Korean student? In one of the most competitive societies in the world, how does one find their place? What does it take to achieve your aspirations and goals? Our documentary will take a look at the lives of five Korean teenagers on the verge of either reaching- or losing- their dreams. The film will follow the students during the most stressful time of their lives- their last year of high school. After studying for roughly sixteen hours each day, their futures boil down to one last exam. On November 10th, 2011, thousands of high school seniors will take a nine hour test that for many, will determine their economic and social status for the rest of their lives.




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20 / M / Seattle
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Posted 2/5/13
It's exactly one of the reasons why I'm a little grateful for going to an American school. Of course our schools are far from perfect (in fact, we have some pretty low test scores compared to other developed countries), but there isn't a strong fear of failing here.
Posted 2/5/13
I can smell the Anarchism from here.
Posted 2/5/13
yep you can power driven place's
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Posted 2/5/13
American students are stupid and lazy. Many enter college without understanding elementary math or how to write a complete sentence. I know this because I taught introductory chemistry and general biology for a year at a state college, and some of my adult students functioned about as well as my eight year old does now. The fact that they were able to graduate from public high school and will likely earn a college degree is both mysterious and depressing.

American students also can't tolerate criticism, even when it is helpfully made and they could learn a lot from it. I've seen college students literally run out of the room crying because they were told to re-write their incorrect answer. So pathetic.

Koreans may have taken high school to the extreme, but there is a lot of value in learning discipline and perseverance at an early age. As to the suicide rate, I wonder how it compares to the suicide rate of American LGBT teens. I don't get the reasoning behind the appearance classes, but there is a lot of stuff I don't understand.

The eye glue I totally get. I think it is a great idea! It looks like it's just the same kind of latex glue used for fake eyelashes, so it's non-toxic (unless you have a latex allergy) and peels off. I like how you can get different eye shapes by using different patterns of glue. I also wonder how long it will actually stick like that and whether I could use a similar strategy on my (non-asian) eyes to open them up and make them look bigger. I suspect that I'll just make a gluey sticky mess.
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25 / M / i wont say
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Posted 2/5/13
americans are taught to not question authority. and we must not believe everything we see and hear on the internet but we must always believe those in power and our teachers in the schools.....
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24 / M / Maryland
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Posted 2/5/13
Sounds rough in Korea. As an American college student I can say we really don't have to work nearly as hard or long as Korean high school students. Glad I live here as I hate math and science, though I'm not terrible at them, but really why do I need calculas for most jobs
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Posted 2/5/13

mhibicke wrote:

American students are stupid and lazy. Many enter college without understanding elementary math or how to write a complete sentence. I know this because I taught introductory chemistry and general biology for a year at a state college, and some of my adult students functioned about as well as my eight year old does now. The fact that they were able to graduate from public high school and will likely earn a college degree is both mysterious and depressing.

American students also can't tolerate criticism, even when it is helpfully made and they could learn a lot from it. I've seen college students literally run out of the room crying because they were told to re-write their incorrect answer. So pathetic.

Koreans may have taken high school to the extreme, but there is a lot of value in learning discipline and perseverance at an early age. As to the suicide rate, I wonder how it compares to the suicide rate of American LGBT teens. I don't get the reasoning behind the appearance classes, but there is a lot of stuff I don't understand.

The eye glue I totally get. I think it is a great idea! It looks like it's just the same kind of latex glue used for fake eyelashes, so it's non-toxic (unless you have a latex allergy) and peels off. I like how you can get different eye shapes by using different patterns of glue. I also wonder how long it will actually stick like that and whether I could use a similar strategy on my (non-asian) eyes to open them up and make them look bigger. I suspect that I'll just make a gluey sticky mess.


What the hell? All American students aren't stupid and lazy. I can form a complete sentence, and I can tolerate criticism. Just because you had certain experience doesn't mean you can generalize Americans or anyone. My parents and friends can take criticism and most of the people I've met in the US and Americans can. This statement...just no. It's rude and offensive.
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Posted 2/5/13

Goomoonryong wrote:
Sounds rough in Korea. As an American college student I can say we really don't have to work nearly as hard or long as Korean high school students. Glad I live here as I hate math and science, though I'm not terrible at them, but really why do I need calculas for most jobs

You would be surprised how many jobs become easier when you know calculus. But that aside, even if you never use calculus, trigonometry, chemistry, physics, geology, or practically any math or science in your future career, the act of learning math and science trains your brain to solve problems linearly and rationally. The problem-solving skills and disciplined thought are useful in every part of your life, forever. Also, the discipline of forcing yourself to learn things that are uncomfortable and challenging teaches you perseverance and adds grit to your character. Think of it like mental cross training - it's good for you even when it hurts.
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Posted 2/5/13

ShiverGirl wrote:
What the hell? All American students aren't stupid and lazy. I can form a complete sentence, and I can tolerate criticism. Just because you had certain experience doesn't mean you can generalize Americans or anyone. My parents and friends can take criticism and most of the people I've met in the US and Americans can. This statement...just no. It's rude and offensive.

I'm glad you can write a complete sentence, but your self-evaluation needs some work. I was rude, but you took offense. There are reasons why American students do so poorly on standardized tests, and one of them is their tendency to be offended when they are told that they are inadequate. If you can't handle a complete stranger criticizing "American students", then how do you expect to defend a dissertation?
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24 / M / Maryland
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Posted 2/5/13

mhibicke wrote:


Goomoonryong wrote:
Sounds rough in Korea. As an American college student I can say we really don't have to work nearly as hard or long as Korean high school students. Glad I live here as I hate math and science, though I'm not terrible at them, but really why do I need calculas for most jobs

You would be surprised how many jobs become easier when you know calculus. But that aside, even if you never use calculus, trigonometry, chemistry, physics, geology, or practically any math or science in your future career, the act of learning math and science trains your brain to solve problems linearly and rationally. The problem-solving skills and disciplined thought are useful in every part of your life, forever. Also, the discipline of forcing yourself to learn things that are uncomfortable and challenging teaches you perseverance and adds grit to your character. Think of it like mental cross training - it's good for you even when it hurts.


Don't get me wrong I think calculus is very useful! Its just that none of the careers that interest me require it. I do find physics, biology, chem, and other basic sciences are useful in day to day life. I use physics in martial arts as it helps one understand why throws work and other moves. So I agree that subjects are useful to know even if my job doesn't need them but I wouldn't want to take a graded college course in them either.
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F / Urban South
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Posted 2/5/13

Goomoonryong wrote:
Don't get me wrong I think calculus is very useful! Its just that none of the careers that interest me require it. I do find physics, biology, chem, and other basic sciences are useful in day to day life. I use physics in martial arts as it helps one understand why throws work and other moves. So I agree that subjects are useful to know even if my job doesn't need them but I wouldn't want to take a graded college course in them either.

It's not for everyone, for sure. Personally, I wouldn't be able to tolerate too much exposure to the humanities or the social sciences, but that is a personality problem rather than an academic one.
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Posted 2/5/13

dartfield111 wrote:

americans are taught to not question authority.
and we must not believe everything we see and hear on the internet but we must always believe those in power and our teachers in the schools.....


I see and that is true.


Ihateyou1234 wrote:

1 year ago.....
A bit late?


So? Good information is good information no matter where and when it comes from.

Posted 2/5/13
no mater how old the info is as long as its true its still not old
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20 / M / UK
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Posted 2/5/13

ShiverGirl wrote:
What the hell? All American students aren't stupid and lazy. I can form a complete sentence, and I can tolerate criticism. Just because you had certain experience doesn't mean you can generalize Americans or anyone.

I agree.
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