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Korean High School and looking pretty
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F / Urban South
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Posted 2/5/13
Gotcha. I will stop conflict-seeking.
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30 / M / New York City
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Posted 2/5/13 , edited 2/5/13
What ever problems they have in school being pretty being expected to get high test scores. It's their fault for putting stress on themselves. Who says they have to follow the norms of that society to fit in. What ever happened to just working hard to the best of your abilities, the only label I want is the label i make for myself. I feel sad when I hear people commit suicide because of expectations this just shows they don't care about themselves.
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Posted 2/5/13 , edited 2/5/13
As a Korean who went to school in Korea before moving to America, I think that it is pretty much correct. Life for a Korean teenager is indeed much harder than that of a person in the U.S. (only, of course, if you compare the average American with the average Korean). However, if the parents, like mine, are well-educated and know how to raise a child, the stereotypes and exaggerations sometimes seem to be untrue.

Korean education is more demanding in many ways:
1.) First, there is a huge amount of competition between your peers and yourself.
2.) Lots, and oh good gosh, so much homework.
3.) Requires lots of critical thinking in class.
4.) Tests, in my opinion, are on average more difficult than those given in the U.S.
5.) Etc.

However, the train of thought that goes along the lines of "Even the smartest American kids would have a tough time if they went to Korea" is very, very wrong. I've met many brilliant people in the United States who could easily breeze through South-Korean level education and succeed. Yes, there are far more uneducated and uniformed kids in the U.S., but the top-notch kids in America should not be underestimated for any reason. Korean education is VERY overrated in the minds of Americans and to the other countries in the world. I've faced situations in the U.S. where any Korean student would also struggle. Also, Korea is so small, so what do you expect? The country would obviously create more land or expand magically if they could. The answer to why America's average scores are lower is pretty obvious, and it is that America is so big and Korea is so small. If Korea was as big as the U.S., I'm sure the average scores would be far lower than what they are now because it would not be a compact and overcrowded area. And if the U.S. was as small as Korea (haha), I'm sure that education standards would go up as well.

Also, AsakoNatsume is quite wrong when it comes to the facts that school is too difficult and there is nothing to do outside of it. Maybe if you're a delinquent who has to make-up a lot of homework? Yeah, that life is possible. But the typical Korean kid who gives enough effort to finish his or her work diligently has a lot of free time. Maybe they don't have as much free time as the average American, but they do have plenty of it.

Unfortunately, I've also seen many smart Korean kids who would have had a great future in America (given that they had the same amount of work ethic) commit suicide because they didn't score high enough or they couldn't find a job even with high scores in high school. And again, I put up the point again that Korea is too small. If there is a huge amount of competition in high school, there's bound to be lots of it to find even a lower middle class job. Even if a Korean kid aces high school, there's always a possibility of another overachieving teenager in another school who will take away his or her future. Although these reasons aren't sufficient enough to describe all of Korea's suicides, the inability to find jobs and not meeting parents' expectations are indeed some causes.

To wrap this rather lengthy comment up (thank goodness I have 204 wpm for this kind of stuff), parenting is everything for a young Korean. I did well in Korea, came to America, transitioned easily, and got accepted to a prestigious college - United States Military Academy/ West Point because of my parents. Of course ALL the credit does not go to them, but they knew how to raise a child even within a competitive atmosphere like Korea. I honestly think that the concept of Korean parents who viciously beat their kids ever since they were very young is a pretty stupid way to help a kid learn to live in life. No, I don't think that all hitting is unnecessary because children do need to be disciplined, but the typical and stereotyped Korean parent who expects so much from their children and works them like child labor victims need parenting lessons. Most Koreans that I've seen who have those types of parents did not do well in Korea.

P.S.
In regards to the plastic surgery, well.. meh. I think KPOP and a bunch of insecure kids explains it all.
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30 / M / New York City
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Posted 2/5/13


I agree with you about the education the 5 points you gave are also true where i came from. Back in the Caribbean we are expected show prowess in everything we did our work, coming to school dressing professionally etc, a wrong step would lead to harsh punishment. Missing home works, constantly doing bad on your work, coming to school with a bad appearance would result in detention where they work you like a slave lol I'm not sure in korea if teachers have the right to beat kids but they did where I came from. In worse case scenarios they do that for bad behavior and for constantly doing badly in your subjects.

I was so surprised how easy school here was compared to back home i think we were at a much higher level. I was also surprised how rude the kids here were to teachers while they didn't nothing about it.
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22 / M / Delaware
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Posted 2/5/13
>_>
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Posted 2/5/13
In theory, beauty is subjective but over the past years the media is trying to make it objective. So I think we all are to blame, because this not only happens in korea.

It seems that life is a bit more difficult for Koreans, but i don't think they don't have much free time. Considering the Korean stereotype, is it not one of his characteristics to be a geek? or gamers? that takes a lot of free time.
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F / In The Meawdow of...
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Posted 2/6/13 , edited 2/6/13

mhibicke wrote:


ShiverGirl wrote:
What the hell? All American students aren't stupid and lazy. I can form a complete sentence, and I can tolerate criticism. Just because you had certain experience doesn't mean you can generalize Americans or anyone. My parents and friends can take criticism and most of the people I've met in the US and Americans can. This statement...just no. It's rude and offensive.

I'm glad you can write a complete sentence, but your self-evaluation needs some work. I was rude, but you took offense. There are reasons why American students do so poorly on standardized tests, and one of them is their tendency to be offended when they are told that they are inadequate. If you can't handle a complete stranger criticizing "American students", then how do you expect to defend a dissertation?


It's normal for people to take offense when you make a rude statement. What if, I just went saying all Muslims are terrorists? People will take offense. Some people handle it well than others, and I know for a fact America is way better than other countries. In Nigeria, if you even insult a person they will FIGHT you, not even civil words for peace will be considered. I'm quite find at handling criticism, but I hate when people make generalizations like they know everything and everyone. Calling ALL American students stupid and lazy is pretty uncalled for.

Though I do admit, the American education system is pretty average and easy, compared what I have gone through. They never really give homework to their students and compared to other countries, Americans have it easy. So I'm not too surprised at people calling some of them stupid and lazy. In fact sometimes my friends say it too. Though not all of them are dumb or lazy.

No, I don't think I should reply to you again. I'd rather stay ignorant about the rude thoughts going around in your head.
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21 / F / Vancouver,British...
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Posted 2/6/13
That documentary was AMAZING... ii loved it (:
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25 / M / Nova Scotia, Canada
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Posted 2/6/13
I wrote a philosophy entry about this, once. Beauty, that is. My conclusion was that beauty is whatever visual stimuli - always visual, in the case of beauty - is capable of bringing that sense to it's fullest condition of proper function. Or something to that effect. Which means beauty is literally in the eye of the beholder.

I came to understand that old saying, at that point.

The media, your "buddies", - hell, even anime - if you allow them to control your perception of beauty, that just means you have bad taste. Such outer influences are inescapable corrupting agents, however. I still hunt them down within myself, to this day. I shudder to think of those who allow it to progress ...

I guess that makes it all subjective opinion, in the end, doesn't it? Let the high school girls believe what they wish to believe about their appearance. The truth could bludgeon them half to death and they still wouldn't believe they have their own unique brand of beauty to bring forth.
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19 / M / Canada
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Posted 2/6/13
This happens in Korea and China. I'm lucky that I moved to Canada. School here is just easy as hell.
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34 / F / room of iniquity
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Posted 2/6/13 , edited 2/6/13

ShiverGirl wrote:


mhibicke wrote:


ShiverGirl wrote:
What the hell? All American students aren't stupid and lazy. I can form a complete sentence, and I can tolerate criticism. Just because you had certain experience doesn't mean you can generalize Americans or anyone. My parents and friends can take criticism and most of the people I've met in the US and Americans can. This statement...just no. It's rude and offensive.

I'm glad you can write a complete sentence, but your self-evaluation needs some work. I was rude, but you took offense. There are reasons why American students do so poorly on standardized tests, and one of them is their tendency to be offended when they are told that they are inadequate. If you can't handle a complete stranger criticizing "American students", then how do you expect to defend a dissertation?


It's normal for people to take offense when you make a rude statement. What if, I just went saying all Muslims are terrorists? People will take offense. Some people handle it well than others, and I know for a fact America is way better than other countries. In Nigeria, if you even insult a person they will FIGHT you, not even civil words for peace will be considered. I'm quite find at handling criticism, but I hate when people make generalizations like they know everything and everyone. Calling ALL American students stupid and lazy is pretty uncalled for.

Though I do admit, the American education system is pretty average and easy, compared what I have gone through. They never really give homework to their students and compared to other countries, Americans have it easy. So I'm not too surprised at people calling some of them stupid and lazy. In fact sometimes my friends say it too. Though not all of them are dumb or lazy.

No, I don't think I should reply to you again. I'd rather stay ignorant about the rude thoughts going around in your head.


all of you make very valid points and i must agree with "gay asian boy" on several levels
but mhibickel is stating a very serious issue here in the states
the way the system is set up is by how many graduate
out of a class of 32 you might have 70 percent that graduate (this is high school u.s. public high school)
teachers pass kids along stretching grades making a D student into a C+ student and so on and so forth that by the time that child arrives at college he or she is woefully unprepared
where as the flip side of that
the school with the high scores gets the money
where as teachers must they lie/ cheat for that 30 percent so they can get the tools they need to better the 70

and that 70 percent are fine with that B they didn't earn so why should they challenge themselves
that is the lazy he means (i hope... i mean he is an educator. he wont stay one for long if he doesn't believe in what he does)
but the children are not stupid (misguided stubborn products of their environment) but not stupid.... lazy yes
and don't say students aren't lazy 'cause if they weren't they'd beg for more homework
but if you couldn't get a car without a high school diploma
couldn't get a job without a high school diploma
couldn't buy certain items with out a high school diploma
were not allowed in certain places with out a high school diploma
maybe just maybe students would take it more seriously
but for now the youth is wasted on the young (at lease 30 percent
kruz 
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Posted 2/6/13

mhibicke wrote:

American students are stupid and lazy. Many enter college without understanding elementary math or how to write a complete sentence. I know this because I taught introductory chemistry and general biology for a year at a state college, and some of my adult students functioned about as well as my eight year old does now. The fact that they were able to graduate from public high school and will likely earn a college degree is both mysterious and depressing.

American students also can't tolerate criticism, even when it is helpfully made and they could learn a lot from it. I've seen college students literally run out of the room crying because they were told to re-write their incorrect answer. So pathetic.

Koreans may have taken high school to the extreme, but there is a lot of value in learning discipline and perseverance at an early age. As to the suicide rate, I wonder how it compares to the suicide rate of American LGBT teens. I don't get the reasoning behind the appearance classes, but there is a lot of stuff I don't understand.

The eye glue I totally get. I think it is a great idea! It looks like it's just the same kind of latex glue used for fake eyelashes, so it's non-toxic (unless you have a latex allergy) and peels off. I like how you can get different eye shapes by using different patterns of glue. I also wonder how long it will actually stick like that and whether I could use a similar strategy on my (non-asian) eyes to open them up and make them look bigger. I suspect that I'll just make a gluey sticky mess.


This
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Posted 2/6/13 , edited 2/6/13

Teung wrote:

It's exactly one of the reasons why I'm a little grateful for going to an American school. Of course our schools are far from perfect (in fact, we have some pretty low test scores compared to other developed countries), but there isn't a strong fear of failing here.


Yeah haha, an F is nothing. (To commit suicide over or go on a shooting rampage in campus)
I mean that piece of paper will not destroy your future, you can do other things...
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24 / M / U.S.
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Posted 2/9/13
This is very true. I remember watching some old Korean movies 10 years ago and they went through this kind of hardship meaning, death / suicide, drop outs, trying to get financially supported.
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28 / F / Heaven
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Posted 2/26/13
OP nuked.

Feel free to recreate.

~Locked
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