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こんばん!
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24 / M / Oklahoma
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Posted 3/15/13
私はならう日本語です!

てつだう ;__;

As you can tell, I've been learning some Japanese (From class and on my own)

What I want you guys to do it help me with my Kanji :c I'm going to Japan in give or take one and a half years, I need to know what Kanji would help me be there just generally, I'll be there for two weeks some Kanji I have picked up

駅 ー Station
水 ー Water
左 ー Left
右 ー Right
入りロ ー Entrance
出ロ ー Exit

I need halp D:

ありがとございます!!
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24 / F / aTsu qU mu kEni,,...
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Posted 3/15/13
r u from japan??? or ur a filipino??
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24 / M / Oklahoma
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Posted 3/15/13
I'm actually American ^_^
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24 / F / aTsu qU mu kEni,,...
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Posted 3/15/13 , edited 3/15/13
okei. from wat country??
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24 / M / Oklahoma
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Posted 3/15/13
I'm guessing you mean state Ha, I'm from Oklahoma
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24 / F / aTsu qU mu kEni,,...
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Posted 3/15/13
haha.. sorry.. i mean state.. oh okei.. how young r you??
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24 / M / Oklahoma
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Posted 3/15/13
I'm 16 (*≧m≦*)
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27 / M / ロンドン、カナダ
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Posted 3/15/13 , edited 3/15/13

Bofangle wrote:

私はならう日本語です!

てつだう ;__;

As you can tell, I've been learning some Japanese (From class and on my own)


私はならう日本語です is wrong on many, many levels. You're missing particles, the sentence construction is wrong, you have the verbs up at the start of the sentence instead of the end, you have verb-tense issues...

Additionally, the title of your thread is off. こんばん means "This Evening". Presumably you meant to say こんばんは.
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24 / M / Oklahoma
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Posted 3/15/13
Oh, well dang ha >___< Thanks for pointing it out or I would have never known well until I have gotten more knowledge on sentence structure
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43 / M / Reno, NV, USA
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Posted 3/16/13
You've got a year and a half to go, so you've some time left before your trip. I'd definitely suggest you not get too far ahead of yourself, and take the time to learn proper Japanese properly. You'll be much better off in the end. Kanji familiarity will certainly be useful in Japan, but it can wait a bit. I'd suggest concentrating on learning the basic grammar and just how to express yourself properly in Japanese first. As Mono-no-Aware basically said, 私はならう日本語です...てつだう is grammatical disaster. (Other than 私は at the beginning, andです at the end, it looks like you've just mapped one-for-one Japanese words onto an English sentence without regard for tenses.) A native Japanese confronted with this would likely be confused, amused, or possibly even insulted. :-) Good luck!
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27 / M / ロンドン、カナダ
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Posted 3/16/13
^ Definitely listen to this guy's advice. I think it's common for a lot of new Japanese learners to try and take on too much too quickly--the end result is that you learn a lot of random pieces of information, but don't really have the foundation to use them properly.

It'd be good to start with the kana (hiragana/katakana), and then get yourself some decent textbooks (I recommend Japanese for Busy People) and then, if it is possible, find a local tutor who can help you work through the units each week. It's important not to rush through information-heavy textbooks. Thankfully, JFBP also has a variety of exercises and quizzes throughout to routinely test your comprehension.

With a year or so of solid work you can have a decent enough foundation to express yourself in Japanese in short, basic and understandable sentences. But learning a language takes a great deal of work, and many years to get to even an intermediate level, so there's really no effective method apart from consistent work and dedication.

Best of luck!


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25 / M / Tokyo, Japan
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Posted 3/18/13
女 - woman
女達 - women
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F / R'lyeh
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Posted 3/22/13 , edited 3/22/13
Well, you're definitely not going to want to start off with kanji. It's just as Sushipath said.

With that in mind, I suppose there are some basic words and phrases you'd like to get to know, and I will gladly give you a little push:

Asking Where Something Is
______ はと゛こて゛すか

______ wa doko desu ka

The は is a subject marker. と゛こ is "where", て゛す is "am/is/are", and か is a spoken question mark. So translated literally, the statement is Romanized as more or less literally:

"____ where is?"

Here are some useful nouns for you to plug into that blank:

Bathroom ---> おてあらい -----> otearai (oh-tay-ah-rye)
Hotel ---> ホテル -----> hoteru
Bus Stop ----> ハ゛ステイ ----> basutei (pronounced sort of like "bus stay", drop that "u" in the middle)
Restaurant ----> レストラン -----> resutoran (drop the "u" in the middle)
House ------> うち -----> uchi (oo-chee)

Forming a Japanese Sentence

You saw how something called "particles" was mentioned before, right? And how you were told your verb was in the wrong place? I'll help you figure out what all that means right here.

Japanese sentence structure, apart from demanding that verbs come at the end of a sentence, is pretty fluid. You can put the subject, the location of the action, just about anything wherever you darn well please. As you can imagine, that would get pretty confusing unless there were something to clearly mark what part of the sentence serves what purpose. That's where particles come in.

A "particle" is a marker. It tells you which part of the sentence, from the subject, to the location of the action, to the direction of the action, to whatever, was just said. Let me show you some in action so you can see what I mean:

わたしたなかさんのうちて゛すしたへ゛ますo
"Watashi wa Tanaka-san no uchi de sushi wo tabemasu."
"I am eating sushi at Tanaka-san's house."

In this example sentence there is a total of three particles, all highlighted in blue. The first, は, is a subject marker. Next comes て゛, a location marker. て゛ tells us where the action is happening. Finally, there's わ, the verb marker. The verb has to stay at the end, but provided the other parts of the sentence keep their particles in the right places, it doesn't matter if you rearrange the subject and the location. So the sentence could also be written as:

たなかさんのうちて゛わたしすしたへ゛ますo
"Tanaka-san no uchi de watashi wa sushi wo tabemasu."
"I am eating sushi at Tanaka-san's house."

Either one is grammatically valid, and you'll be understood if you say either one because the particles will tell the listener which part of the sentence was just said. A listener will be looking for particles as you speak, so it's very important to always use the right one and to put it in the right place every time. There are a lot of other particles besides the ones I just used, though. You should look up what each and every one does so you know where to put them.
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M / 七十七 / ミシガン
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Posted 3/22/13 , edited 3/22/13

BlueOni wrote:
わたしたなかさんのうちて゛すしたへ゛ますo
"Watashi wa Tanaka-san no uchi de sushi wo tabemasu."
"I am eating sushi at Tanaka-san's house."

Finally, there's わ, the verb marker.

たなかさんのうちて゛わたしすしたへ゛ますo
"Tanaka-san no uchi de watashi wa sushi wo tabemasu."
"I am eating sushi at Tanaka-san's house."

Hmm, I think u made a mistake in both examples above (but they seem to be the same mistake). Your すしわ should be すしを. Also, I think a better way of explaining を as a particle might be to say that it's the Direct Object marker (at least that's the way I learned it ).

In any case, thx for putting in the time to explain some helpful things for beginners!
ism3rd 
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20 / M / Chiba / Japan
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Posted 3/23/13
Hello everyone.
I'm japanese. and I leaning English.

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