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Post Reply Why Non-Japanese Otakus should NEVER visit Japan
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29 / M / 3º world! Chile T...
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Posted 4/4/13
its a shame that you stop doing stuff because the perception of a third person about something. You are still young so it's normal that you get influence by others, but you should be aware that the things that your friend told you are not fact just the perception of one person.

Anyway about the WWII nuke, its not about being "pretty pissed off about it". Atomic bombs are not joke, you should learn about their effects. To be honest I'm still upset with US and I'm a Chilean without any connections to JP, and pls don't even dare to compare it with sep 11. One was the decision of a nation with a negative impact in the life of generations, the other ... I really don't need to explain the differences right? ¬¬
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Posted 4/4/13
I got stared at in Tokyo one day because of what I wore. It was
B R I G H T Blue. Black Reebok Realflex with bright blue laces and blue soles, blue stylish cut jeans, and a blue button shirt. I stood out because no one really wore anything bright.
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29 / M / 3º world! Chile T...
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Posted 4/4/13

GodWhomIsMike wrote:

I got stared at in Tokyo one day because of what I wore. It was
B R I G H T Blue. Black Reebok Realflex with bright blue laces and blue soles, blue stylish cut jeans, and a blue button shirt. I stood out because no one really wore anything bright.


that certainly only happens in japan, other society doesn't stare ay ppl that wear different clothes or are different.
Posted 4/4/13 , edited 4/4/13
Like that we're ever you go the outsider thing xd

But I have lots Japanese Friends and am dating some one from Japan well engaged so it probably depends on how rude you are am not no like tourist I just stroll about mentally get exited but don't show it because that says tourist xd


But like we're I live in small town in UK we get loots Chinese and Viennese and Japanese tourist because it's old Roman Tudor town that still has. Loot old listed buildings what not and sand stone castle and let's say they like to randomly stop dead in front of you take images of every think like dam it next you be taking image of the floor not going lie I seen loot people do it but the thing is like the stop dead take images out blue like dam it and they won't move because they don't under stand you like but gets to point that were there from they take images of any one and any thing and not respect the rules because I made some tourist dale the image of my disabled bro to some time one because made my bro feel like a animals at a zoo because they never seen 15 year old boy in weal chair

So depends how much you stick out but your going get nasty remarks any were you go


But most anger is in older people and WW2 XD
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Posted 4/4/13

Nobodycl wrote:


GodWhomIsMike wrote:

I got stared at in Tokyo one day because of what I wore. It was
B R I G H T Blue. Black Reebok Realflex with bright blue laces and blue soles, blue stylish cut jeans, and a blue button shirt. I stood out because no one really wore anything bright.


that certainly only happens in japan, other society doesn't stare ay ppl that wear different clothes or are different.



BLUE!!!!!!!!



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Posted 4/5/13


You weren't stared at because of your lack of fashion sense.
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Posted 4/5/13

haikinka
You weren't stared at because of your lack of fashion sense.


What he said.
As a non-Asian foreigner you will be stared at regardless of what you are wearing.

When going to Japan though I usually have a few t-shirts made with witty sentences in Japanese to provoke Japanese people into staring.
Don't worry, it's nothing rude and it usually results in people laughing, asking me if I know what the text on the shirt sais and where they can buy one.

One of the shirts that provoked the most laughs, sneaky cell phone pictures and even provoked people into chatter with me was the one that said
"!DANGER! Large Foreigner!"

Except in Osaka, there my Hanshin Tigers shirt catches the eyes and cheers of many Kansaijin.
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Posted 4/5/13
Look as long as you don't act like this person in this video in Japan you should be fine.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eaMxy6FF4Lk
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Posted 4/5/13 , edited 4/5/13
Wow, disregarding the links below on other, very extreme stuff these people have done, even the behaviour in the train warants a ticket home with a stamp in their passport and the tourist administration saying "You'll only be welcomed back in Japan when you grow the f*ck up"
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Posted 4/6/13
I'm gonna completely ignore the incredibly rude posts on this thread and give an update of my stance on this issue:

I believe it is possible for non-japanese people to visit Japan and not be CONSTANTLY beaten down socially, but you will face a small amount of unequal treatment and can never get away from that, no matter how much you know about/practice Japanese culture. I've watched videos on YouTube of foreigners who have actually BEEN to Japan and i've deduced from all of these videos a general mapping of what to face as a foreigner in Japan.

Because I havn't studied enough, for the following segment, I am simply going to give typical reactions to a young, white male from America. If you are NOT matching that description, not all of this may apply. Some entirely different reactions may apply instead.

The harshest amount of judgement you can expect to receive is from older Japanese men, who have lived through WWII. I don't have a specific list of what to expect, but they might ask you some unpleasant questions such as "When are you leaving?" or "What are you doing here?". The reason for this, as one of the videos I watched pointed out, is that to them, you look like an American soldier much like the ones that they used to fight or observed Japanese soldiers fighting during the war.

Married couples or Japanese people in that general age range are pretty neutral when it comes to foreigners. They tend not to interact with you unless they have to or if you initiate a conversation. However, conversations with these kinds of Japanese people are often short-lived, unless you do something to impress them, which we will talk about later

Teenagers and young kids, especially schoolgirls, will give you the most attention. Foreigners' reactions to this attention differ. Some feel very badgered and annoyed by this, others feel like rock stars. These teens will approach you and ask you a load of questions because they don't have many opportunities to interact with foreigners. Keep in mind, however, that this attention isn't because of any personal interest towards you as an individual, but rather attributed to the fact that you are a foreigner. Many teens will ask you to give them English lessons, but if you don't feel up to this, you can apologize and decline the offer.

However, Japanese people of ALL ages WILL stare at you EVERYWHERE you go. The most important thing to keep in mind though is that this staring isn't because they are secretly hating you inside and are pissed off that you are there, but because you are a rarity. This is just like an American would stare at someone wearing a banana suit on the bus. It's simply something you don't see that often.

Knowing the most you can about Japanese culture and customs really helps your credibility. If you are able to even say the SLIGHTEST fragment of correct Japanese to an native Japanese person, it will shock them and they will say "Your Japanese is very good!". The more you know, the better you will be treated. Of course, there are some things like Japanese body language that may be just too hard to study. Things like these can ONLY be learned by actually VISITING Japan for a lengthy amount of time. You will pick up on these quickly, though. Also, it helps to leave your American stereotypes at the airport. Don't be loud. Don't be obnoxious. Don't be rude. Don't be pushy of your beliefs, likes, and customs on people. You are in THEIR country. The more you can prove you are NOT like the stereotypes that Japanese people have about Americans, the better off you'll be. There have been cases where Japanese businesses don't serve foreign customers, but finding those are very rare...and if you do, it's probably not because YOU are a foreigner, but because of trouble that the business has had with stupid, loud, obnoxious foreigners in the past who weren't smart about being in Japan and scared away business with their ignorant shenanigans.

One of the most common things said in all the videos I've watched is that the Japanese are a polite people and believe in being nice to others, so don't expect too harsh of a social exclusion in Japan. You will NEVER fit in with the crowd, and will be reminded everyday for as long as you are in Japan that you are a foreigner and won't be treated as an equal to a native Japanese person, but at the same time, IT DOESN'T HAVE TO SUCK! You can be treated nicely in Japan if you respect the culture and the people and be knowledgeable about it. So go on! Learn all you can (not just stuff in Anime/Manga but literally EVERYTHING about Japanese culture) and take a trip down there. You will find it's not as bad as you think.

Hopefully, this update will get some of this thread's haters off my back as well

See ya, Crunchyrollers!
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27 / M / ロンドン、カナダ
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Posted 4/7/13

rukialuvr93 wrote:

I've watched videos on YouTube of foreigners who have actually BEEN to Japan and i've deduced from all of these videos a general mapping of what to face as a foreigner in Japan.


Well, who am I going to believe...my friends, both Japanese and non-Japanese, who have lived in Japan for countless years, or a 19 year old from MA who is basing his argument on youtube videos.
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24 / M / Yuki-shi Japan
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Posted 4/8/13
I live in Japan right now and it is pretty nice. Granted you have to be a bit more mature like not going too crazy for anime and manga. Even Japanese people that do this are looked down upon. You can do that at Akihabara since its expected. Most Japanese people really don't care if your a foreigner as long as you are not causing trouble. If anything if you are providing a service that benefits the community then they would love you. More and more people is moving to Japan and they welcome it unless you are a total freak. The whole "experience" in japan is based on situation. Some people had a bad time and made youtube vids while others that had a great time made youtube vids or just didn't say anything.
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Posted 4/11/13 , edited 4/11/13
I have a friend who lived in Japan and studied at the famed Nihon Ki-in. He wasn't an Otaku and he had never seen Hikaru No Go. He became a bit of a Henshin addict while there really enjoying Japanese Tokusatsu. But even in an extremely venerated cultural institution he was greatly welcomed.

If I ever travel to Japan I intend to go with him if possible and meet up with a friend in Tokyo who is a film maker. I have had friends who have filmed documentaries in Japan and have had great enjoyment and even been granted access to locations not normally available to cameras like an interview with creators of Gundam in their animation studio.I also had a professor who was an associate professor in Android studies at Osaka University. So yeah...I can admit to being a mecha nerd as well as an Otaku. I actually started my local Anime community to extend beyond school based or library based clubs.

In my case its a selfish sentiment. I am a person with a disability that has a high probability of making me loose the ability to walk after forty. A Japanese company invented a robotic assisted limb. They called it H.A.L. and are named cyberdyne systems (these people are totally designing your robot overlords) I will likely make use of this technology and have had the opportunity to speak with scientists who work in such fields in the hopes of promoting public awareness of practical applications and I am interested in the psychological study of human robotic interaction in society. I intend to help advance this cause in whatever ways I can through my writing.

What hurts me is that I feel I don't know many people in Japan. I worry about objectifying Japanese culture as a commodity and crushing any chance of making meaningful friendship or cultural exchange. I only have one close friend who has lived in Japan and one or two acquanitences currently living there. What I worry about is my enjoyment of anime might be seen partly as cultural appropriation and that I might draw the wrong ideas about the culture from popular media. I hope just having this sentiment or being aware can help me to ameliorate it if I do get the opportunity to visit. What have your experiences been?
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24 / M / Yuki-shi Japan
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Posted 4/12/13

marmondesu wrote:

I have a friend who lived in Japan and studied at the famed Nihon Ki-in. He wasn't an Otaku and he had never seen Hikaru No Go. He became a bit of a Henshin addict while there really enjoying Japanese Tokusatsu. But even in an extremely venerated cultural institution he was greatly welcomed.

If I ever travel to Japan I intend to go with him if possible and meet up with a friend in Tokyo who is a film maker. I have had friends who have filmed documentaries in Japan and have had great enjoyment and even been granted access to locations not normally available to cameras like an interview with creators of Gundam in their animation studio.I also had a professor who was an associate professor in Android studies at Osaka University. So yeah...I can admit to being a mecha nerd as well as an Otaku. I actually started my local Anime community to extend beyond school based or library based clubs.

In my case its a selfish sentiment. I am a person with a disability that has a high probability of making me loose the ability to walk after forty. A Japanese company invented a robotic assisted limb. They called it H.A.L. and are named cyberdyne systems (these people are totally designing your robot overlords) I will likely make use of this technology and have had the opportunity to speak with scientists who work in such fields in the hopes of promoting public awareness of practical applications and I am interested in the psychological study of human robotic interaction in society. I intend to help advance this cause in whatever ways I can through my writing.

What hurts me is that I feel I don't know many people in Japan. I worry about objectifying Japanese culture as a commodity and crushing any chance of making meaningful friendship or cultural exchange. I only have one close friend who has lived in Japan and one or two acquanitences currently living there. What I worry about is my enjoyment of anime might be seen partly as cultural appropriation and that I might draw the wrong ideas about the culture from popular media. I hope just having this sentiment or being aware can help me to ameliorate it if I do get the opportunity to visit. What have your experiences been?


well from what I have seen, if you like anime then that's cool. The only cartoons for the most part that's main stream is anime. They just don't want to see people walking around in a typical town holding a full body pillow saying Waifu. I seen people do this in Akihabara so I guess its cool there but from this small mild size city, nope I never saw it.
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45 / M / ohayou
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Posted 4/12/13
Here's the best advice for when you travel ANYWHERE, Japan included.


Be friendly and open-minded. People will appreciate this and will treat you with the warmth and respect that you offer them. Outside the cities, Japan can be fairly insular, even to the point of cold to people who are not from the local area. That includes other Japanese, as well. Even in such areas, if you're friendly and understanding to people, it breaks the ice, and you will be accepted; perhaps not immediately, but soon enough.
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