First  Prev  1  2  3  Next  Last
Accents
Banned
33175 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
18 / M / Stoke, England
Offline
Posted 4/1/13

koji8123 wrote:


You've been a Member Since: Jul 31, 2010.
What are you talking about '08, kid?


This isn't my original account. That's probably incredibly obvious, if I claim to have joined in 2008 when my profile only says 2010.


MioxAzusa wrote:


Yes please do, I would like to have my ears bleed....


Ahaha, witty banter.

Minus the witty.
2637 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
20 / F / Wherever the wind...
Offline
Posted 4/1/13

PhyongHwa wrote:

I'm still wondering why when people sing they (on the most part) lose their accents......


Right? I also noticed that. Especially with Muse. Although there are some people who still retain their accent when they sing, and when I listen to their songs I just can't imagine it sung in another accent. Like that Engrish OP from Mirai Nikki. I sing it in Engrish btw 'cause it just sounds, um, better.

Reminds me of this one time I heard my classmate singing a Lily Allen song. It was kinda funny 'cause she sang it with the same Cockney accent Allen has. xD

6108 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
19 / M / Brisbane
Offline
Posted 4/1/13

PhyongHwa wrote:

I'm still wondering why when people sing they (on the most part) lose their accents......


When you sing its generally to a rythym, your words have to fit a time-frame of being pronounced. What usually ends up is quite wonderful where while singing you generally have people change accented letters based on the time/step that the song is based on.

As far as accents go, I have had my accent called many things (British, Canadian, German) but I like to think its unique because My first language was Croatian but I have grown up in Australia, yet still speak Croatian regularly. As such I don't generally have the slavic harshness in pronunciation.
4582 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
20 / F / ireland
Offline
Posted 4/2/13
Only one I do is typing shite instead of shit.

It just looks wrong with no 'e' since I'd never say it that way.
69616 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
Offline
Posted 4/2/13
Me no have accent, mai engwish purfect.
37266 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
23 / M
Offline
Posted 4/2/13 , edited 4/2/13
I only notice with certain words or spellings... wanker, math/maths, gas/petrol, color/colour. If I start to identify a poster with a certain accent, I've noticed that my mind starts to add it to the "voice" that I use to read the post.

For example,


CarboKill wrote:

Ahaha, witty banter.

This is pretty much what CarboKill sounds like in my head when I hear the word "banter":
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5rKYL0tW-Ek&t=0m25s
I should also note that this is how I picture most brits online. Yes, I am aware that Britain is not a Monty Python set. Nonetheless, I will continue to read british posts as though it were -- get over it. It makes for an enjoyable read.

A gun-crazed American sounds like this:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nUbIekD2PEQ&t=0m14s

And a moron (specifically, the type of person that says "utilize" rather than "use," or "I could care less," or anyone that is clearly an idiot and/or tool) sounds like this:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EMTbkfgT_jc&t=0m37s
255 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
Offline
Posted 4/2/13
I think it wood take too much effort for peepull to always write words in their own axe-ent. I am trying it now and it's pretty haard, becuz even the words that look normal are said differently to how you or someone else might say them.
I've no-tissed how authors of thee old often wrote words according to thee axe-ent of a character, which is cool becuz you get a better i-dear-ah of how a character sounds. They don't do that often these days.
Posted 4/2/13
I have a coonass Cajun accent.
35175 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
26 / M
Offline
Posted 4/2/13

haikinka wrote:

Me no have accent, mai engwish purfect.


Why I say dat rite there is purrfect engrish
17469 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
15 / F
Offline
Posted 4/2/13

theYchromosome wrote:

And a moron (specifically, the type of person that says "utilize" rather than "use," or "I could care less," or anyone that is clearly an idiot and/or tool) sounds like this:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EMTbkfgT_jc&t=0m37s

I can use these chopsticks to eat my ramen, or I can utilize them as the instrument of your death.

It’s just wrong to judge any word as being used only by morons trying to sound important. Also, "utilize" has valid uses in the scientific community. My English teacher rants on about his pet peeve words, and “utilize” is on the top of the list. I view his unhealthy obsessions on stuff like that as a sign of deeper issues and since I can’t vent my frustration at him, you’ll have to do.



32393 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
24 / M / SFC forums(under...
Offline
Posted 4/2/13

doctor_professor wrote:


TrueGoober wrote:

I wonder how bad people think my southern accent is...


i often wonder the same about myself sometimes.


Mine's fairly unnoticeable but when I say something specific it's usually......"OMG THERE IT IS!!'
85087 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
20 / M
Offline
Posted 4/2/13
I see a lot. Well, it's internet what do you expect. People will type any style that they wanted. Even me, i'm not really good with grammars. And I don't care. I'm done with English school.
37266 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
23 / M
Offline
Posted 4/3/13 , edited 4/3/13
trinkit -- A cultivation of utility, i.e. utilization, implies that something has fulfilled some purpose, even if that purpose is to cultivate utility. By definition, then, it has been used. Thus, "utilize" implies "use." Even if the words are defined differently, I will hold that barring an extremely unorthodox definition of either, the word "use" is logically implied by the word "utilize." However, the word "use" does not imply the word "utilize," since you can, in theory, have something for which the purpose is not to create utility. Case in point:


trinkit wrote:
Also, "utilize" has valid uses in the scientific community.


You are right to note that the word has a valid meaning, as I don't mean to claim that the word is worthless. Notice that, in my original post, my claim was that the type of person that says "utilize" rather than "use" is a moron. My claim is not that anyone that says "utilize" is a moron. That is, during those times when the word "utilize" and "use" can be used equivalently, saying "utilize," while technically valid, cheapens the word. They are attempting to use the word as an equivalent, rather than noting that they are not, indeed, the same word.

What these people are generally trying to call attention upon is the fact that the action or object that they are describing has a purpose, by which "use" more closely resembles their meaning. By using the word "utilize" the meaning is to single out the cultivation of utility as the primary purpose, and draw attention to this. Utilize does have valid use, but to claim that something has been utilized is a stronger condition than to claim that it has been used.


It’s just wrong to judge any word as being used only by morons trying to sound important.


I agree entirely. Again, I never said that anyone that uses the word "utilize" is a moron. I said that anyone that says "utilize" where the word "use" would have an otherwise equivalent meaning is a moron. In the same way that I might view someone that uses "could" and "couldn't" equivalently as a moron. If the words mean the same thing, then "utilize" is worthless. If they mean different things, then using them interchangeably is inaccurate. My problem is not certain words, but rather people ignoring the fact that words are meant to have some meaning attributed to them.

Alternatively, I'd make the claim that, with regards to people not knowing what the words they are saying mean, I'm not judging them as morons, so much as guessing that they're morons. Yeah, they might not be, but the information available to me at the moment suggests otherwise. A very similar situation is the use of "iPod" rather than "Portable Music Player," or "MP3 Player". When someone uses the word "iPod" to describe, say, a Zune or any other MP3 Player that is not, actually, an iPod, I get the same feeling. Yes it's possible that he thinks the word "iPod" is a word that describes all portable music players, but the chances are good that he's using words that disregard the specific meaning that he's trying do get across. I don't think he's a moron, I think he is probably a moron. Although, depending on the definition of judgement, perhaps I am judging him to be a moron, in which case I don't think it's a problem.



My English teacher rants on about his pet peeve words, and “utilize” is on the top of the list. I view his unhealthy obsessions on stuff like that as a sign of deeper issues and since I can’t vent my frustration at him, you’ll have to do.


Everyone has deeper issues, which means that worrying about it, in itself, might be a sign of deeper issues. In which case I'd say that I, probably, share your deeper issues (probably his too). I have no problem with someone that uses the word utilize, or any other word. I have a problem with nonsense. And while use/utilize isn't necessarily nonsense, it sure feels like nonsense for a great number of the times that it's used. The only saving grace is that I don't know for sure whether the person speaking actually knows what he's talking about.
18322 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
M / Dublin, Ireland (...
Offline
Posted 4/3/13
Aight, yer, Ah don't really tyup de way Oi tawk, plobably becuz ih doesn ma'er.

And a video heyur. Me voice is deepa now so... Yer.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CC3HV-lmk5A
27003 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
24 / M / your mind
Offline
Posted 4/3/13
I have been told that when I drink I begin to show a southern accent, not sure how that would translate into typing though
First  Prev  1  2  3  Next  Last
You must be logged in to post.