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Are Americans afraid of their combat veterans?
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22 / M / Los Angeles
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Posted 4/13/13 , edited 4/13/13
Personally I strongly respect veterans, my uncle being an old veteran (Korean War and Vietnam '64-'70) and several friends having enlisted (those @$$holes left me in this $hitty town). Do I fear them? Generally, not at all. The exceptions being 1) my uncle, an angry old man, whose inclination to violence as a solution ultimately makes a good series of stories to recount. 2) My friends, because they are friends and undoubtedly will have changed either for better or worse, then use what training they learned to make our social gatherings and escapades into something destructive.
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28 / M / United States
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Posted 4/13/13
Kandahar and helmand/Farah provinces
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30 / M / Empire of Walker
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Posted 4/13/13

Realtaliation wrote:

Personally I strongly respect veterans, my uncle being an old veteran (Korean War and Vietnam '64-'70) and several friends having enlisted (those @$$holes left me in this $hitty town). Do I fear them? Generally, not at all. The exceptions being 1) my uncle, an angry old man, whose inclination to violence as a solution ultimately makes a good series of stories to recount. 2) My friends, because they are friends and undoubtedly will have changed either for better or worse, then use what training they learned to make our social gatherings and escapades into something destructive.


Exactly, I don't want to be that guy.


Cheezymac wrote:

Kandahar and helmand/Farah provinces


Were you a 21B or 89D? Because I wouldn't get into a truck around there.
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30 / M / Empire of Walker
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Posted 4/13/13
What questions do people have?
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28 / M / United States
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Posted 4/13/13
I'm Air Force EOD so am 3E8, but thats the same as an 89D. Not the best area to be hitting the roads, no doubt. Yeah, those assholes would have a bomb in the middle of the road to be obvious, and then put a daisy chain right where we would pull up to maintain a safe distance. They started to get real tricky in the last couple years. I'm out now, but trash on the side of the road or suspicious looking curbs still freak me out haha.
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Posted 4/13/13
I've worked with some veterans who had PTSD...
My first job, the guy seemed normal, ofc, we all knew he was a vet and had ptsd...
One day, he picked up a pan, and started flailing it and hitting the fridge...
Honestly, I was kinda confused and scared, so I stayed away from him after that, and life continued.

Not fear, not intimidated, and I respect you guys, for putting up with the BS of our government.
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25 / M / California (Bay A...
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Posted 4/13/13
People shouldn't be afraid of you. You are a hero after all.
phanAn 
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63 / F / OP,FL
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Posted 4/13/13 , edited 4/13/13
You will get many answers some good ,some bad and some just plain stupid and sarcastic. But for me the answer is no . American's are not afraid of their sons and brothers and fathers who served their Country. We are however fearful of the anger issues and trauma that remain.

I personally want to know why your family didn't embrace your safe return.

One of my sons has gone not once but twice. An each time I was a nervous wreck.(Iraq and Afganistan)
I myself am Vietnam era vet. Most of my family has served and for those who gave me grief ..... well they were just Stoners with a terrible fashion sense(plaid pants with paisley print shirts) how could I take them seriously???

The thing is to get it together and live a good life. And by all means use that GI Bill get ahead of those fools.
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28 / M / United States
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Posted 4/13/13
Good advice I'm tryin to follow
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33 / M
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Posted 4/14/13
As the son of a veteran, I would like to thank you deeply for your service. It may not seem to mean much to the average American, but there are those who understand the horrors vets go through, and you have my deepest sympathy for the hell you must have witnessed and experienced in the field.

From my vantage point, the average American does in fact appreciate and sympathize with what our veterans have gone through. Thankfully, I mostly see that Americans realize our soldiers constantly face terrible tragedies during their service, and understand that our troops are inculpable for the too-often stupid directives our politicians give them. As such, we mostly view soldiers with thankfulness, knowing that they're willing to risk their lives on our behalfs.

That said, although Americans are generally grateful for the service our veterans have provided, they are also grossly unaware of how completely spiritually shattering fighting on the battlefield can be, and the extent to which it affects our soldiers once they come home. Unfortunately, Americans like to embrace the patriotic side of our military, but are too often discomfited at facing the tragedy that comes with it, and wind up turning a blind eye to the spiritual anguish our troops suffer. We embrace medical terms like "PTSD" to try and explain it away as just a medical condition that can be cured with medicines or psychotherapy, when fundamentally our soldiers have gone through horrific life-changing experiences that have wounded their hearts and souls. What our soldiers need is sympathetic social healing, to be understood and sincerely appreciated for the terrors they've endured, and to be helped in making peace with their traumatic experiences.

Considering some of your statements, you sound to have gone through a lot during your service. If you have a chance, I would recommend reading "War and the Soul" by Edward Tick, a book about combat veterans that has the potential to reframe your experiences in a way that can help you find peace with the realities you were exposed to as a soldier.
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42 / M / Milwaukee,Wiscons...
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Posted 4/14/13
Hating returning vets went out of style with Viet Nam. Lots of Vets do end up homeless, but it's nothing to do with hatred. Much more to do with how the military trains their members how to survive on a battlefield a lot better than they prepare them to survive afterwards.
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29 / M / with Ashy Larry r...
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Posted 4/14/13
I am a vet. Air Force, vehicle maintainer and frequent convoy ride-along. Got to spend time in some ...."interesting places". Kirkuk's F.O.B. being a repeat offender. I saw combat. My friends saw combat. The thing is upon leaving the military we got screwed. The American people shouldn't fear its combat veterans. There are some "establishments" that should not feel safe but I won't speak on that.
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28 / M / USA
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Posted 4/14/13
Am I afraid of veterans? Nope. I know plenty of people who are in the military. My father was in the military, he was an artillery operator.
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F / Urban South
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Posted 4/14/13

ghostwarrior88 wrote:
DADT was repealed, you follow ordered doctrine or you are not a soldier, if COC(chain of command) says a homo is covering your 6, a homo is covering your 6. Officer or enlisted, you follow orders and meet the standard, otherwise your a lame piece of shit whose getting wall-to-wall.

Rape is a problem everywhere, put a bunch of trained killers in one place, it's going to intensify.

Getting raped really sucks, and it hurts a lot. Being hurt by the people who you rely on to stay alive, that sucks also. It's not like being a homo makes getting raped less awful or more tolerable. This kind of thing is why our service members are the heroes of the LGBT community and we invest so much in supporting them.
Seriously though, what kind of idiot would rape someone who regularly walks behind him with a gun? The fact that the military tolerates servicemembers raping each other is good evidence of how we fail to care for our troops.

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31 / M
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Posted 4/14/13
I honestly think its america's way of keeping a level of control over the vets. While they serve tey have total control so they don't have to worry about them much, but vets are different. They have seen things and done things in their service that many don't wish them to speak about. I think that factor alone makes them "a risk" to the current government. you combine that factor with your field of expertice and practical application of that outside the military. I don't think it's that American's see what they learned as practical and more of a threat to society when you see the gun laden news nowadays. look at the current measures for gun control... totally unessary and wont cure the underlying problem at all. it is just gonna take another freedom away from the people. From this and the way I've seen vets treated in recent years its clear the government doesn't give a damn unless it can control you. So I guess what I'm trying to say summed up is I feel for you buddy and I totally agree with how your seeing things. now I'm not doing so how myself in today's world, but I'm learning and adapting. even still, I don't care if I don't have a pot to piss in, whenever I see the vets out doing a drive I always give what I can to help out because the vets deserve it! Someone who fights and survives is far more deserving then someone who sits around twiddling their thumbs in my opinion, and yet thumbs gets everything and vets get empty promises.

/endrant

sorry, I'm extreemly passionite about the subject. My brother came home and for years tried to get help from the VA. they generly ignored him till one day a few years ago and found out he had a desease that could kill him if unchecked. that he had for many years prior. We lost him to a ceasure just about a year ago. i wonder if I might be able to still talk to him if the VA actually did their job and got to him when he first tried to get help all those years ago. then my thoughts go to all the other vets who may or may not be treated the same as he was and i get infuriated that vets get the short end of the stick every time!
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