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Do you brush your teeth before you go to bed every night?
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Posted 7/2/13 , edited 7/2/13
Of course! Don't wanna get used to a bad taste in my mouth. How can you kiss people with that? Haha. >u<
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21 / M / 3D world
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Posted 7/2/13
Its how i keep my teeth white
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28 / Aincrad Floor 61
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Posted 7/2/13
Yes, and ya know what, as it's 11:41pm I'm going to brush them right now. G'night!
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26 / M / Pinellas Park, FL
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Posted 7/2/13
I'm going to be the oddball and just downright say NO. Never. Wasn't brought up to.

I naturally play with my teeth all day so in my 25+ years I have only had one because my wisdom teeth cracked the underside of the tooth. That doesn't mean that staining doesn't occur. If anything brushing before sleeping is good for that.

Also, the excessive brushing makes my teeth sensitive. Used to make eating a whole ordeal.

Flossing though helps against that tarter build-up and other gunk. I'll do that anytime of day, randomly.
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17 / M / Arizona
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Posted 7/3/13
Yeah, unless I fall asleep before I get to it
reziku 
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22 / M
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Posted 7/3/13
Gah reading these posts, half of you people piss me off. Most of the same half, I question where is your logic?!

Why brush your teeth before sleeping?
Well, why take a bath after rolling in the mud or washing your hands after sneezing into them? The reason is to brush off the bacteria and plaque as someone mentioned earlier. It is significantly better to brush at night than it is to brush in the morning.

Why?
Because you eat throughout the day, and if you dont wipe that S off, then you allow the bacteria to feast on the debris over a period of hours and simply cause more bacterial growth and harm to your oral cavity.

Why brush your teeth at night when you still end up with bad breath in the morning?
Well my friend, life simply hates you. 1) it can be genetic related, 2) you need to work on a better diet.

To the person that mentioned about saliva increasing bacterial growth... it is partially true. Yes the saliva can give bacteria food resources, but at the same time saliva has essential repair building blocks to remineralize the enamel. Nowadays people take a lot of medications to control systemic problems (high blood pressure, diabetes, heart conditions, etc), and a common side effect of these medications is "xerostomia", or "dry mouth" for the layman's term. Reducing the salivary flow in turn increases decay rate because less saliva = less remineralization.

"I don't brush my teeth and I don't have a single cavity"
Whoopedy F-ing do, lucky you. Go thank your parents for your lovely genetics, there are a few others like you as well but not everyone is lucky like you.



Source: I JUST graduated from a 3 year Dental Hygiene school.
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20 / M / San Antonio, TX,...
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Posted 7/3/13 , edited 7/3/13
Errrmmm.......it's a 50/50 chance that I usually brush at night but reading this is gonna make me wanna do do it more often. .-.

Update: I brushed my teeth just now....Happy? xD
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21 / F / United States
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Posted 7/3/13
Yes!
I can't sleep unless I do.
Posted 7/3/13

reziku wrote:

Gah reading these posts, half of you people piss me off. Most of the same half, I question where is your logic?!

Why brush your teeth before sleeping?
Well, why take a bath after rolling in the mud or washing your hands after sneezing into them? The reason is to brush off the bacteria and plaque as someone mentioned earlier. It is significantly better to brush at night than it is to brush in the morning.

Why?
Because you eat throughout the day, and if you dont wipe that S off, then you allow the bacteria to feast on the debris over a period of hours and simply cause more bacterial growth and harm to your oral cavity.

Why brush your teeth at night when you still end up with bad breath in the morning?
Well my friend, life simply hates you. 1) it can be genetic related, 2) you need to work on a better diet.

To the person that mentioned about saliva increasing bacterial growth... it is partially true. Yes the saliva can give bacteria food resources, but at the same time saliva has essential repair building blocks to remineralize the enamel. Nowadays people take a lot of medications to control systemic problems (high blood pressure, diabetes, heart conditions, etc), and a common side effect of these medications is "xerostomia", or "dry mouth" for the layman's term. Reducing the salivary flow in turn increases decay rate because less saliva = less remineralization.

"I don't brush my teeth and I don't have a single cavity"
Whoopedy F-ing do, lucky you. Go thank your parents for your lovely genetics, there are a few others like you as well but not everyone is lucky like you.



Source: I JUST graduated from a 3 year Dental Hygiene school.


You're my hero! If I don't brush my teeth before going to bed I just feel so nasty when I wake up!
Koyu 
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Posted 7/3/13
Yeahh I do. Honestly I dont mind the feeling of going to bed not brushing them. I havent done that in a long time but the reason I do it is just to keep my teeth healthy and hopefully get them even whiter x3
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14 / F / California
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Posted 7/3/13
Yes but mostly because I have braces and I'm scared of staining and to keep clean
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18 / M / Tiphares
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Posted 7/3/13 , edited 7/3/13

reziku wrote:

Gah reading these posts, half of you people piss me off. Most of the same half, I question where is your logic?!

Why brush your teeth before sleeping?
Well, why take a bath after rolling in the mud or washing your hands after sneezing into them? The reason is to brush off the bacteria and plaque as someone mentioned earlier. It is significantly better to brush at night than it is to brush in the morning.

Why?
Because you eat throughout the day, and if you dont wipe that S off, then you allow the bacteria to feast on the debris over a period of hours and simply cause more bacterial growth and harm to your oral cavity.

Why brush your teeth at night when you still end up with bad breath in the morning?
Well my friend, life simply hates you. 1) it can be genetic related, 2) you need to work on a better diet.

To the person that mentioned about saliva increasing bacterial growth... it is partially true. Yes the saliva can give bacteria food resources, but at the same time saliva has essential repair building blocks to remineralize the enamel. Nowadays people take a lot of medications to control systemic problems (high blood pressure, diabetes, heart conditions, etc), and a common side effect of these medications is "xerostomia", or "dry mouth" for the layman's term. Reducing the salivary flow in turn increases decay rate because less saliva = less remineralization.

"I don't brush my teeth and I don't have a single cavity"
Whoopedy F-ing do, lucky you. Go thank your parents for your lovely genetics, there are a few others like you as well but not everyone is lucky like you.



Source: I JUST graduated from a 3 year Dental Hygiene school.


Are your teeth pearly white? Do they sparkle? Your shiny teeth and you?
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18 / M / Pennsylvania
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Posted 7/3/13
Yeah, sometimes I even brush them three times a day instead of my usual two :p
Posted 7/3/13
No.
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21 / M
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Posted 7/3/13
Sometimes...4/7 days a week...

Eh, lazy...and it doesn't really matter for me, natural straight teeth and they somehow stay looking white without having to brush 2 times a day.
I think it has to do with my diet though, no soda/processed juice, no coffee, only water and natural juice w/out sugar.
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