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Student Speaking Against a Teacher in Class
19828 cr points
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19 / M
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Posted 5/10/13
This guy deserves a high five. Wish I could give him one, but then internet...
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26 / F / Seattle
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Posted 5/10/13
I.......was homeschooled
mipegg 
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22 / M / England
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Posted 5/11/13

technoducky wrote:

At uni we have a guy who takes every opportunity to argue with the lecturers, any time he puts his hand up you can tell everyone in the room wants to beat him with a blunt object.
Most of the time it is utterly useless vague questions that do not cover the course material and unless you specialise heavily in that field you probably could not answer off the top of your head.
He is not the most popular guy on our course.


You're at university, the very point of higher education is that you want to specialise heavily into that area and your lecturers will be highly specialised in their areas if you go to a good uni. Its far better than people who just shlum up, sit down, copy down everything the lecturer says and doesnt care at all who just wants their 2nd degree and then a paycheck. Those people are exactly the types who become lazy useless teachers because theres nothing else for them to do and they just dont care
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20 / M / UK
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Posted 5/11/13

mipegg wrote:


technoducky wrote:

At uni we have a guy who takes every opportunity to argue with the lecturers, any time he puts his hand up you can tell everyone in the room wants to beat him with a blunt object.
Most of the time it is utterly useless vague questions that do not cover the course material and unless you specialise heavily in that field you probably could not answer off the top of your head.
He is not the most popular guy on our course.


You're at university, the very point of higher education is that you want to specialise heavily into that area and your lecturers will be highly specialised in their areas if you go to a good uni. Its far better than people who just shlum up, sit down, copy down everything the lecturer says and doesnt care at all who just wants their 2nd degree and then a paycheck. Those people are exactly the types who become lazy useless teachers because theres nothing else for them to do and they just dont care


Actually when you have to assign two (sometimes just one) lecturer to teach an entire module then it is very difficult to get one which has an in depth knowledge of the entire module, example: we take a module in Java programming and have a single lecturer for it, there is not a single person on earth who can specialise in every aspect of that.

Plus you don't really specialise at Uni until your 3rd year, until then it is just hoop jumping.

Anyway, I think I'm happy being the person who either waits until the end of the lecture or emails the lecturer about any questions I have, doesn't try to make the lecturer look like an idiot, doesn't make myself look like idiot in the process, remains unhated by the majority of the course and still gets a first in the exams and 80% of the coursework. Everybody wins.
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20 / F / San Carlos city
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Posted 5/11/13
I wish I had the same courage.
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22 / F
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Posted 5/11/13 , edited 5/11/13
oh, a packet is a brief (took me awhile to figure that out)

Even in college your tutors have to explain the brief , how will we know what they want from you. (if they don't explain it i might as well be at home)

o____o There is nothing worse then having to listen to an infusasic speaker.




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18 / F / New zealand
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Posted 5/11/13
AGREED. Preach it man. Our generation is looking good for the future.
Posted 5/11/13
hehehe about time some one said something but then again not came across a teacher like this
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23 / M
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Posted 5/11/13 , edited 5/11/13
I always sort of treated High School as a bit of a joke anyway, so it's hard for me to take the guy seriously. But I think the biggest problem with both high school and undergraduate university (I don't yet have experience in graduate work) is that people don't go there to be educated. It's not a place for education, but for certification; I've found that most students treat it this way. When students talk about the course, it's "What grade did you get? How did you do on the test?" or even sometimes, "Did you do the homework? Let me copy." Rather than "What do you think about the material? Do you get this part?" Students aren't there to learn as much as they are to get certified for learning.

Probably my least favorite part of undergraduate courses and high school is that, if I spend the time that I'm in class studying instead of being in class, I'll very likely have learned more than if I had gone to class. The reason, I think, is that students often expect that the lecturer has the duty of teaching the material, so they just end up lecturing on the book. I can read a lot faster than they can talk, and I can take my time to think through things that I don't understand. So I don't see this as the best way to school. Believe it or not, I don't really think it's teachers' jobs to teach the material, but to clarify it. By and large, most material can be learned simply by reading a good textbook. When you start to hit a wall, then you ask someone that understands it already for clarification -- I've had a couple of classes that were pretty good at this (mostly at the higher-end courses) However, because most students primarily care about being certified, and only about learning as a way to that end, they spend much more time learning about the teachers' grading habits: what they look for, what's going to be on the test, and what they "should study." They only learn what they absolutely need to get whatever grade they desire -- anything additional seems a bit of a waste to them.

Of course, there are exceptions. Once I got into my upper level Math courses (my major), pretty much everyone that was there was trying to learn, and I've even had one class where the question "what's the test going to cover" was never even asked -- it's irrelevant when the concepts are what you care about. It's nice to be in a place where there's a collective understanding that getting a good grade doesn't mean shit when you don't know what you're talking about. I imagine things like upper-level chemistry, physics, biology, art, music, etc. is also pretty similar -- everyone that's there wants to learn. I imagine grad school to be pretty similar, but I thought in High School that college would be like that, and I was very much mistaken, so we'll see.

Anyway, my point is this -- if we want to fix education, then there's very little we can do by throwing money at the problem. As far as I can tell, it's a cultural issue. Politics, education, economics, science -- all of it results largely from the cultural tendencies of the demographic. This is why voting in most countries is regional, why war often results from ideological differences, and why my upper-level math courses are much more enjoyable to attend than ENG 101 (I got an A on every assignment, but ended up with a C in the course because I never showed up -- go figure) If you want students to learn more, then they've got to have value on learning, which probably means a cultural shift to a society that actually values knowledgeable people for their knowledge, rather than their ability to "produce" because they're knowledgeable (not that being productive isn't valuable -- it is).

Edit: Since I mentioned culture, maybe I should note that I've lived in an American culture my whole life, so to be fair, my first-hand data set is only really relevant for my country (although I expect it's the same in most places).
Posted 5/11/13
Absolute LEGEND HAHAAHAHHA !!!!!

This guy is awesome !!! He made a really REALLY good point !! And obviously the teacher cannot accept defeat so she tells him to get out because she knows he's completely right. Psssshhh teachers need this all the time LOL.
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Posted 6/28/13 , edited 6/28/13
The government is screwing up the school system. They threaten to split my school into two mini schools if they don't comply to the crappy Broad of Education standards. I know in New York City they are encouraging group activity, and the way they are doing sucks

You know what they are doing? They are assigning kids one task in each group......a teddy bear, a paint brush, glasses lol this shit makes me laugh. So basically if you have the "paint brush" role you draw what's related to the topic. The fuck? What if I spend the whole semester drawing????
Posted 6/28/13

magicuser360 wrote:

Some teachers need this.


That.
Posted 6/28/13

magicuser360 wrote:

Some teachers need this.


That.
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34 / M
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Posted 6/28/13
I'm seeing a lot of people putting their two cents in about what exactly a teacher's job entails. IMO, I would think that logically a teacher's job is to teach. Failing to teach is failing in their duties. Handing out packets and letting the students complete them independently could be used as a test of comprehension, but I do not think that it constitutes teaching. He clearly stated that she only provided packets and she did not correct that statement or indicate that it was wrong in any way. Regardless of how appropriate his outburst was, he is correct to say the teacher is not teaching.

There are many ways to teach. Debate, Socratic method, lecture, discussion, multimedia presentation, etc. We can argue the merits or appropriateness of various methods ad nauseum, but they all involve the educator interacting with the material and their class on some level. I wouldn't ask for every teacher to be amazing, but I would ask for every teacher to be competent and involved.

I have been both a student and a teacher. It is a student's responsibility to put in effort to learn, but it is also a teacher's responsibility to put in effort to teach. If you want to be paid do the work. If you want to be lazy and worthless, go home and let someone else earn that pay.
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21 / F / Quezon City, Phil...
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Posted 6/28/13
I always fighting with the teachers for good intention.
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