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Post Reply Student Speaking Against a Teacher in Class
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30 / mars
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Posted 6/29/13
its always a shaky thing going against those in power. right or wrong, to challenge those in power takes incredible guts. sometimes it pays off but sometimes it doesnt. what if this didnt go viral? she could just hit that kid with the banhammer and never let him back into class ruining his grades and his chance to pass that class for being a disruption. even if he was in the right, because the ones in power are corrupt, unless things are shown to the masses there is no help for the little man. especially if his views arent popular at the time. but i agree this kid deserves some praise. someone should start a kickstarter and send him to college. hes like thor of highschool
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24 / M
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Posted 6/29/13 , edited 6/29/13
I had five or six paragraphs typed up and stupidly lost it all when I opened dictionary.com in the same page through the quicksearch bar because I forgot to regularly make a copy of what I'd been typing... So, since I don't feel like typing it all again, nor can I remember it all, I'll keep this relatively short.

I definitely agree that his outburst was at least somewhat inappropriate, especially with the word "fricking" strewn throughout, he makes a solid point. Handing a student a work packet and telling them to do it, with no explanation of the subject it's covering is not teaching, and the teacher in the video sounded highly apathetic considering her only responses were: "yeah," "uh huh," and "go outside." I was lucky enough to never get a teacher like that, though when my mom was in highschool she had a math teacher that was just that, he would hand out packets with no explanation and if someone stated that they didn't understand a problem his only response would be, "just do it."

There are many ways to teach a class, whether you have everyone go over the textbook together and explain key points as well as anything someone doesn't understand, or create a presentation featuring what's going to be learned. My teacher for my Algebra 1 and Geometry classes in middle school would use an overhead projector to explain the topic, as well as show the current formula in use, generally with some kind of visual gimmick to help and during this time we were tasked to take notes on our own of what she was showing and explaining. Oftentimes she would also use a physical demonstration of the formula, if applicable, to help cement the idea. In this way she was able to explain things visually and auditorily, as well as the occasional hands on example. Because of this, there were few times that somebody didn't understand something, and if so they could ask questions with no pressure of feeling like they're wasting time, stupid, or not paying attention. Other days, especially after a big test at the end of a key point of the curriculum we would have a day off to play board games, or one time we had a class wide contest where we paired off in groups of two or three to see who could build the tallest, sturdiest tower of Legos in the given time frame. I can't remember a single time I needed my math textbook in that class, outside of times we were assigned homework contained within it. Though I'll admit that due to the way the class curriculums were created, at least here in California, there were parts of the textbook we didn't touch at all, and as such never learned, such as matrixes. Although I think that's decided by the state or the school board, but I'm not really sure.

As far as motivation goes, while I agree it's on the students to put effort into learning, it is definitely part of the teachers job to try and keep them motivated. While there will always be some kids with no motivation, there are different ways to try and keep the classes interesting; such as conducting various experiments in science classes, conducting contests in English classes between students on usage of what's being taught where the winner(s) are decided by the class as a whole, or as my middle school math teacher did, usage of physical examples and games. Sadly, the only example I can think of in terms of what my math teacher did was when we were learning about fractals she had us cut shapes out of paper and use them to build a fractal, then trace and color them.

One thing I wish schools would stop doing though, is forcing group activities, especially for worksheets; though for large projects that could take days or weeks I can understand the need. As an introvert I've always worked best by myself; though I always got along well with my classmates and was never opposed to discussing the topic with those near me, or helping those who asked. I hated getting paired up with people I didn't, or barely knew only to be told to "work together" when I could finish the worksheet faster by myself and with less hassle. Even once I was done, or in some cases especially because I was done, I could help people out afterwards more easily, and I always tried to not just give the answer, but explain why it was the answer.

At this point I've forgotten what else I previously had typed up so I'll leave it at this for now.

Edit: In reference to, and I suppose partly in defense of my rant about group work I'll link to a video that supports my opinion for those that care: http://www.ted.com/talks/susan_cain_the_power_of_introverts.html.
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30 / mars
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Posted 6/29/13
heres an example of a bad teacher. btw when i wasnt on mars, i went to school texas, like this kid. we would arrive in class. have a seat. there would be notes on the overhead projector. our only job was to copy the notes EXACTLY while the teacher read them aloud. every thursday we would have quiz. open notes. the next day the quizes are returned graded. every 4th friday we had a test, open notes open quiz.
the quizes would be over the notes, the test would be random questions from the quizes. at the end of every 6 weeks we would have a notecheck, and exams. the exams were open notes, open quizes and open tests. the exams were random questions from the quizes and tests. and final exams were over all of the notes/quizes/tests that were taken, so if you took notes you got an easy 100. but no real learning went on in this class
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21 / M / Amegakure
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Posted 6/29/13
In my opinion, no matter who it is, if they have a valid point, they should speak up, no matter the consequences.
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